Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I use sweet gum for framing.  With it, I've never encountered a problem fairing a hull's interior with a rasp.    The cut/coarseness of a rasp, coupled with the characteristics of other types of wood may conspire to cause chip-out. 

 

The ends of the Auriou chair maker's rasp are shaped differently but both are stiched the same.  One end of the Corradi sculptor's rasp has wood-file teeth on it.  The file teeth will not contribute to chip-out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I would mention to anyone making the plunge to buy chisels, there are two learning curves: one, to learn to weld the chisel and ideally carve and two, to sharpen the chisel itself. The first Is dependent on the latter. Most, if not all of the best qualities of a chisel are lost if it isn’t sharp. (To be useful, lathes and mills also require some learning as well, in my opinion.)
 

If you are model shipbuilder and can tie your shoes, then you have the patience and the dexterity to master sharpening. Part of that challenge, in my opinion, is knowing how a sharp tool behaves! So, if you are new to this, find someone to sharpen your tool for you to start with! Once mastered, excellent performance can come from even middling tools.
 

Like everyone else, I vote for buying nice tools. More so for carving tools in particular, since a chisel will last decades if used correctly (or close to correctly). I still have my chisels bought in the late eighties. I will also mention that it is easy to recondition old carving tools and the like, and that can be a very cost-effective path. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, EricWilliamMarshall said:

Part of that challenge, in my opinion, is knowing how a sharp tool behaves!

Very true Eric

I recently spend time to hone my chisels. I especially focused on the strop until both surfaces were like mirrors. They are now so sharp that any casual contact with fingers will draw blood. However, I now see how a chisel should work, it should effortlessly cut the wood in any direction, with or across the grain. If it does not, it is not sharp enough. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I take great pride in sharpening all my shop tools, plane irons, chisels, and knifes.  Some years ago my wife bought me a book written by Leonard Lee of Lee Valley Tools.  This is an excellent book that covers all aspects of sharpening, metallurgy, and and stone construction.  The ISBN # for the book is

ISBN 1-56158-125-9.  It is listed on the Lee Valley Tool web site.  Hope this is helpful to some.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/11/2021 at 8:51 PM, Diver said:

this is the kind of detail this book brings to sharpening

I will also add there is a lot of practical information in the book as will as great background knowledge from the point of view of both an user of tools and as a maker of tools. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anent the chair makers' rasp Charles Green mentioned, Alec Tiranti is a good source of artists' tools. The Milani rasps, while not as fine as Auriou, are - fine. I note a reference to Narex; they are a Czech company and make good full-size tools. Also, have a look at Robert Sorby's Micro tools. Not as micro as Model Dockyard's but high quality. druxey is on the money about careful use of rasps - great ply wreckers. My day job is woodcarving...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm late to this discussion, so it might not be helpful anymore, but....

 

I would recommend an inexpensive set of good chisels.  These can be easy to find actually.  No need to spend a lot of money of chisels.  A selection of MHG Bench Chisels would work (about $14 each size,) or a set of Stanley Sweetheart Chisels would also work.   I assume you have a way to sharpen them. If not you do need sharpening stones and a bit of practice.  All the more reason to get an inexpensive set.  I would spend a bit more on a good rasp, and look out for one that has hand cut teeth.  A good chair maker's rasp will probably cost you about $75-100, but it will be worth it in the long run.  And a set of needle files will be necessary in my opinion.

 

I use a small bandsaw to re-saw lumber, and then hand plane the board, then sand to final thickness.  A thickness planner will also work well.  There are a million ways to get the job done.  I hope my few comments were helpful.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know others dismiss these as toys but I have used them to great effect. Used them in the last couple of days to clean up a badly cut rabbet and other issues. Remarkably sharp and easy to control for miniature work. I also use their miniature block plane to  spile planks, remarkably suited to that job. If there is any interest I will take photos of my process.

 https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/miniature-tools/chisels/72391-veritas-miniature-chisels?item=05P8501

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/hand-tools/miniature-tools/planes/70138-veritas-miniature-block-plane?item=05P8220

 

Edited by turangi
Link to post
Share on other sites

To add my tuppenceworth to the debate, stones - water or oil - are the gold standard and yield the best results on balance. However, if you can find glaziers who replace broken shop (store) windows, they will, in the UK anyway, sell you small pieces of float glass. Spoken to persuasively, they will cut them and fire the edges. Automotive wet-and-dry abrasive sheet in varying grades can then be glued on and used to refine your edges. Easy to replace when worn and you can use them while you save up for the Japanese water stone you really want. BTW, lubricate with 3-in-1 oil, diluted with white spirit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...