Jump to content

Recommended Posts

If that's what they are using as the bearding line, then it will be a fairly steep rabbet directly below the bulwarks.  Can you show us the stern?  if the line continues to just follow the bulkheads then I'm not sure it's really a bearding line at all and they are just leaving the modeler to wing it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rachel,

 

so the rabbet isn’t a physical piece, instead a it’s a method of cutting a “grove” into the keel. This is done because your planks have width, when the planks meet the keel the best look is one where the planks sit flush against the keel instead of a lip at the bottom. the angle of the rabbet is determined by the angle in which the planks meet the keel. Basically you cut the rabbet is if you were going to plank one more strake (horizontal band of planks) at the garboard (very bottom planks). It’s an easy thing to forget to do but it really makes a huge difference. All of @GuntherMT advise is good advise! If you have a small chisel you could try to cut the rabbet with that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Rach10199 said:

The last pic shows the ship in a more completed phase.

 

20210112_094523.jpg

20210112_094515.jpg

20210112_094552.jpg

I’m not sure how to quote a single picture but the second photo IMO shows the bearding line, not a dashed line but the line that follows the bottom of your bulk heads. Basically from the bottom of your bulkheads to the bottom of your false keel gets tapered, down to what ever the thickness of the planks your using. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rachel, based on those pictures, they are leaving it pretty much up to you to figure it out, but it looks like the curved line at the bottom of the bulkheads is where you should start the rabbet, and it should end (be at full depth) where the line is shown in that last picture, which is defining the 'keel'.  

 

I am horrible at drawing, but I made a horrible drawing to try to show this.

 

BeardingDrawing.jpg.474214169d8997e3a7492894aca020ae.jpg

In the above drawing the green line is the bearding line, where the rabbet starts, and the red line is the edge of the keel, as shown in the final picture in your post above.  The rabbet would be at full plank thickness where it hits the edge of the keel (red line) and smoothly flow up to the edges of the bulkheads at the green line (my green line doesn't touch my bulkheads because I'm terrible at drawing).  

 

So along the bottom where the bulkheads angle steeply or at nearly a 90 degree angle into the false keel, the rabbet will simply be a squared off "U" or modified "V" shape, while at the bow and stern you would can cut the full depth rabbet at the red line and then remove wood at a shallow angle up to the green line so that the line of planks smoothly crosses that area.

 

I hope that makes sense?

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, GuntherMT said:

I hope that makes sense?

It  makes sense.  I would like to see a video of someone chiseling away at it (I've not tried this) to get a sense of the technique. 

 

And your horrible drawing is just fine haha, it shows what it needs to show👍 Thank you for taking the time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really hard to show rabbet work in photo's, but hopefully this will better show what I'm talking about.

 

022Keelstern.jpg.d82bab5847d76445927a4209fe9e8597.jpg

 

In the above photo, my model has a different wood for a keel, but the rest is the same.  The bearding line is the pencil line you see which pretty much follows the bottom of the bulkheads.  You will have to define the actual line of the keel for your model based upon the plan drawings (I would transfer that line to the false keel to work from).

 

In the photo, the rabbet is at the depth of both layers of planking combined where it touches the keel, but makes a shallow transition up to the bearding line at the bottom of the bulkheads so that when the planks are placed there is no hard transition, they just bend smoothly along the angle until the butt-ends hit the keel (or the edge of the planks for the bottom strake).

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Rach10199 said:

It  makes sense.  I would like to see a video of someone chiseling away at it (I've not tried this) to get a sense of the technique. 

 

And your horrible drawing is just fine haha, it shows what it needs to show👍 Thank you for taking the time.

 

I'm sure everyone has different techniques, I was just winging it.  It was easier on my model because the keel wood is much harder than the false keel, so I didn't need to worry much about going past it.

 

For you, since you will be cutting into the same piece, you first want to make what is called a 'stop cut', which is simply a vertical cut into the wood, along the line of the edge of the keel.  Then you will use a very sharp chisel or hobby knife and take off very thin slices of wood working into the stop-cut (which functions to 'stop your cut').


Don't try to make the stop-cut full depth the first time, work in small increments.


I used a combination of a chisel (or chisels) a small X-acto knife (used the curved blades for this) and sandpaper.  

 

If you have a good small V chisel or gouge you might start by cutting the rabbet along the bottom where you don't need to worry about making the shallow angle, and then work on the ends.

 

Edit: Use scrap wood from the parts sheet the keel or bulkheads came out of to practice!

Edited by GuntherMT
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rachel,

 

Last piece of information from me on this topic. Here are two illustrations that do a good job at showing the cut for a rabbet. @GuntherMT illustration is a really good way to imagine the bearding line of the entire hull and giving you an idea of what to cut. Hopefully this gives a clear picture of the cut. 

DA5C7FF1-8ADA-4BEC-ACA5-E53C26C63419.jpeg

7BBF75CB-5315-4F59-AE02-6E94CBE232BD.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can't easily remove the stem, keel and sternpost pieces ( ... considering creating the rabbet is easier done with those pieces out of the picture )

you might consider covering them with masking tape while you do your trimming.

 

After trimming with chisel or whatever, you can fine tune with course sanding paper..

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Rach10199 said:

Where can I find the rest of this?

That looks like the instructions you find in the Model Shipways kits like this one.

 

Armed Virginia sloop

 

A lot of those Model Shipways kits have downloadable instructions.

 

The instructions by Chuck for Syren and Confederacy are like tutorials for model ship building..

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Gregory said:

That looks like the instructions you find in the Model Shipways kits like this one.

 

Armed Virginia sloop

 

A lot of those Model Shipways kits have downloadable instructions.

 

The instructions by Chuck for Syren and Confederacy are like tutorials for model ship building..

 

Excellent! Thank you 😄

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a few days and I'm patiently waiting for my walnut planking strips to arrive 🙄. In the meantime, the keel clamp I ordered did arrive so I made a base for it as it came w/o one.

20210117_164751.thumb.jpg.d2d1432d28d830af3bef5a2d05ea591e.jpg

 

I also put together the little life boat that came with my kit. I glued all of the layers together and applied a sealer to the whole thing after sanding the hull. I then applied a coat of white acrylic,  sanded, more acrylic,  sanded a tiny bit more but not much then more acrylic.  After it dried I applied a coat of polyurethane semi-gloss.  Honestly this little boat was the best part of the kit so far! I think it turned out pretty well, though I could've paid more attention to the rudder. I'll probably take a blade to it to make some defining lines.

20210117_170040.thumb.jpg.9d41c75fbfe9665b478c02b6b29eb9ad.jpg20210117_165854.thumb.jpg.42075e8886e8f90614f27edbf8b8cc05.jpg20210117_170258.thumb.jpg.85d8423f08ecbc24f061225d2d09f314.jpg20210117_170351.thumb.jpg.36226b2ac0062207e9c9318fb057ec9f.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Planking can be a daunting task if going in unprepared. If you haven’t, check some of the tutorials on the site, they should prove very useful! 
 

Your plank bending jig is a cool idea, I haven’t thought of using peg board for bending planks, so nice work!

 

Bradley

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...