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Fifie by GBModeler - FINISHED - Scale 1:48 - Typical late 1800s Scottish Herring Drifter


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Ah, OK, I wasn't aware that it is ream of uncut paper. So we have then 0.6096 m x 0.9144 m x 500 = 278.7 m^2 and 6142.5 g / 278.7 m^2 = 22.06 g/m^2. That looks more like it and is actually a quite light paper. This is actually quite helpful, as I have tried to find over here something equivalent to your paper.

Yes, I have noticed that in the US they sometimes use some rather obscure units ... I can calculate in feet and inches, but when it comes to drams, gallons, fl.oz. etc. it gets complicated.

 

There may have been several ways of attaching the reef-points, but a common way seems to have been also, to unravel the rope a bit in the middle and then to sew the three unravelled parts to the grommet on one side of the sail. Difficult reproduce on a model even at 1:48 scale though. A tight figure-of-eight-knot, distorted so that it forms a sort of crown and glued to the sail may do the job. One could even flatten the the knot by pushing a thin metal tube over it, while it is still wet, soaked with PVA glue.

 

Didn't have the the idea with tube at the time, but tried to use tweezers here on an example in 1:87 scale:

 

https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/models/botter/BotterModel/BotterModel-159.jpg

Edited by wefalck
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7 minutes ago, wefalck said:

Ah, OK, I wasn't aware that it is ream of uncut paper. So we have then 0.6096 m x 0.9144 m x 500 = 278.7 m^2 and 6142.5 g / 278.7 m^2 = 22.06 g/m^2. That looks more like it and is actually a quite light paper. This is actually quite helpful, as I have tried to find over here something equivalent to your paper.

Yes, I have noticed that in the US they sometimes use some rather obscure units ... I can calculate in feet and inches, but when it comes to drams, gallons, fl.oz. etc. it gets complicated.

 

There may have been several ways of attaching the reef-points, but a common way seems to have been also, to unravel the rope a bit in the middle and then to sew the three unravelled parts to the grommet on one side of the sail. Difficult reproduce on a model even at 1:48 scale though. A tight figure-of-eight-knot, distorted so that it forms a sort of crown and glued to the sail may do the job. One could even flatten the the knot by pushing a thin metal tube over it, while it is still wet, soaked with PVA glue.

 

Didn't have the the idea with tube at the time, but tried to use tweezers here on an example in 1:87 scale:

 

https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/models/botter/BotterModel/BotterModel-159.jpg

Excellent!  Is that a botter?  I want to build a botter some day...

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I always make a stand for my boats from inexpensive, unfinished wooden plaques.  These are found at craft stores for just a few dollars each.  I also like using  wood beads for "posts" on the plaques.  I say I like using the beads because I purchased a small bag of them (various sizes) and I think I have a life-time supply😬.  The last element to my stands are wooden dowels (1/8 inch diameter) and steel piano wire (about 1mm diameter).

 

The plaques are laminated pine and not very high quality.  I'm good with that because I think a "work boat" should be displayed simply.  I don't want the stand to be higher quality than the model! 🤔

 

Here are most of the raw materials and a penny for scale...

D79ED33F-A3B4-4E25-B0D9-A0C7C4B576EA.jpeg
 

I stain the plaque and beads with an appropriate color, and then coat them with "wipe-on" polyurethane varnish.  Usually three coats of varnish does the trick.  The polyurethane dries (for handling) in a few hours, so the whole process only takes a couple of days from start to finish...

3E8DCBCB-B0EC-40EB-B47C-34B49DAE069F.jpeg
 

The beads have pre-drilled holes, so I just glue them to the wood dowel...

8C016D4A-FC7A-486E-AAAC-D24D410D0BDA.jpeg
 

The dowel is cut flush with the top of the pile, and the peg on the bottom is glued into a hole drilled in the plaque.  After that, I drill holes down the center of the dowel, almost the full length, and insert the steel piano wire as far as it will go, finished off with some light tapping with a hammer...

0132343F-47DB-4E64-9CE2-7D6B8BB606B5.jpeg
 

I drill holes through the keel of the boat to accept the piano wire.  After a little adjusting with pliers to make sure the wire is straight ( to make sure the ship is straight) and viola...

8CC8BF17-FA84-4DF2-94C7-7665268FDB3F.jpeg

 

The ship is mounted!

E62D571C-425F-4EA6-9F36-A10C915372A6.thumb.jpeg.d5e6bb92d10cdf736be228cfd0d0f756.jpeg

Edited by Gbmodeler
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Having immersed myself in the history and aesthetic of the sailing drifters of Scotland for the last few months, and having studied lots of photos, I can’t help but think they must have been pretty fast boats.  Long and fairly narrow, with fine, sharp bow sections, and low wetted surface, I bet they could really move with the wind on the beam.

Edited by EKE
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13 hours ago, EKE said:

Having immersed myself in the history and aesthetic of the sailing drifters of Scotland for the last few months, and having studied lots of photos, I can’t help but think they must have been pretty fast boats.  Long and fairly narrow, with fine, sharp bow sections, and low wetted surface, I bet they could really move with the wind on the beam.

I didn't see any direct quotes, but one of my books said a Fifie beat a steamer back to port.  The steamer was doing 14 knots!

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2 hours ago, Wintergreen said:

Excellent work and display!

Thank you for sharing.

You utilize the "less is more", which I think is very appropriate on a working craft.

 

What's next?

Thanks Wintergreen! Don't know what's next.  Waiting for inspiration...

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1 hour ago, Gbmodeler said:

I didn't see any direct quotes, but one of my books said a Fifie beat a steamer back to port.  The steamer was doing 14 knots!


I just found the passage you may be speaking about, in March’s “Sailing Drifters”, page 260-261.  “A 60-footer, fishing in illegal waters in the Minch, was surprised by a fishery cruiser, and although the Government vessel was doing 14 knots, the lugger beat her into Stornoway”.  
 

Not surprising to read that.   60 ft. + on the waterline, and as I said, a really fair hull shape with low wetted surface.  In a fair breeze and the right point-of-sail, 14+ knots is certainly quite possible.  
 

Your model is really magnificent.  Beautiful job. It captures the flavor of what those boats must have been like.

Edited by EKE
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These guys had to be fast not only to evade government steamers, but also, in the absence of refrigerated holds, to get the catch quickly to the Scottish fish-lasses for gutting, salting and barreling. A considerable proportion of the annual production was exported to the catholic countries of Portugal and Spain, who could not fulfil their own demand of fish for the many fasting-days in their calendar.

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1 hour ago, EKE said:


I just found the passage you may be speaking about, in March’s “Sailing Drifters”, page 260-261.  “A 60-footer, fishing in illegal waters in the Minch, was surprised by a fishery cruiser, and although the Government vessel was doing 14 knots, the lugger beat her into Stornoway”.  
 

Not surprising to read that.   60 ft. + on the waterline, and as I said, a really fair hull shape with low wetted surface.  In a fair breeze and the right point-of-sail, 14+ knots is certainly quite possible.  
 

Your model is really magnificent.  Beautiful job. It captures the flavor of what those boats must have been like.

Yes, that's the reference I remember!  Thanks EKE👍

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  • 3 weeks later...

A wonderful looking boat. The description of making the sails was VERY helpful.

 

Not sure if I’m being redundant but I came across an excellent documentary on youtube about the fifie The series is “The boats that made Britain” or something close to that title. My apologies if this has been mentioned previously...Moab

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11 hours ago, Moab said:

A wonderful looking boat. The description of making the sails was VERY helpful.

 

Not sure if I’m being redundant but I came across an excellent documentary on youtube about the fifie The series is “The boats that made Britain” or something close to that title. My apologies if this has been mentioned previously...Moab

Thanks for the info!  I think I found it:  "The boats that built Britain - The Reaper"

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