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The Hayling Hoy 1760 by Luc - 1:48 scale - First fully framed model


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My new project, do not expect long texts because I don't like to write 
and my englisch is bad,
but through this way I still want to let other woodbuilders enjoy my work,
just as I enjoy their work on this forum.
Why this ship
This ship would be ideal as a beginnersboat to make a full frame without having 
to make 100 gunports and 3 identical decks.
Everything that is present in a large ship is also reflected in this boat. (Except armament)
A good exercise if we plan to build a larger ship.
Furthermore, this has the advantage that this is a project of 2 years, while a large ship is quickly a multiple of this time.
Let's start.
After waiting for 2 months, a package finally arrived in the letterbox from 
America this week.

1448224634_20210213_1300551.thumb.jpg.ac9c2995d8bebc41d10725f6cccab370.jpg

 

 

After opening the package this came out:

 

 

20210213_130211[1].jpg

 

A complete building description in book form
3 plans by The Hayling Hoy
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And a correction because a frame would have been omitted from the plans.
The book looks decent with beautiful color photos, 
but saddly (from belgium) the plans are not drawn up in the metric system but in inches, feets etc.

A bigger disappointment, the paper with the missing frame.
A mistake has happened here somewhere because the supposedly omitted frame 
is on the plans.
What I do miss is frame AC5
In place of AC5 is frame 7, and instead of sending me AC5, they send me frame fc7 again.

2028575277_20210213_1304401.thumb.jpg.c7207d57d5454a591b44e105c9281a85.jpg

I don't know yet how to solve this?
Does anyone has this frame?
Now the study of this ship is starting, do not know yet whether I will
make it in steamed or plain pear wood.
Time will tell. 

 

 

Edited by luc
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Hello, Luc. I am sure that many of our members would enjoy watching your project come together, but posts with only text and links to photos are not likely to attract much attention. If you are copying & pasting your text from another source, look for the "paste as plain text" option, and use the "choose files" link at the bottom of the edit window to insert photos into your posts. These two things will make your posts more reader-friendly.

 

Wishing you well on your project!

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I have a little question?
As a European, I am used to working with the metric system.

These plans are drawn in the English / American system and use inches, feet, etc.

 

 

On the plans for the width of the frames I see dimensions in inches (I suspect)

I am supposed to do these values each time multiply by  2.54cm and then convert them to a scale of 1/48

Or am I wrong?
Why am I asking this, my calculations don't match what I'm measuring on the plan

 

Example:

 

893757438_20210213_2122291.thumb.jpg.1ad8acfdc4b48d121e6f902984dc92f3.jpg

 

 

213499597_20210213_2122101.thumb.jpg.91039ab3b22443c0ad16688263e260e0.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quote

Making progress, albeit rather slowly. As they say, “The hurrier I go, the behinder I get.”

 

The tapering of the keel and stem should be done before the rabbet is cut. The fore end of the keel is tapered from 12" to 10". This also reduces the width of the lower stem at the boxing joint. From there the stem is given a gentle taper to full width just below the whales. The transition from the boxing joint to the stem can be tricky, so care was taken while sanding.

 

_DSC7039.thumb.jpg.3057453c74c7b8d272d2fcca97c99970.jpg

 

_DSC7046_sfw.thumb.jpg.01e281a9225ddb4c793dc36e9ff5f496.jpg

 

The aft end of the keel is also tapered down from 12" to 10".  Once all the tapering is completed, the rabbet can be cut. The rabbet has been turned vertical and is approx 2 1/2" deep. This will allow for some adjustment later when the 3" planking is added.

 

_DSC7048_sfw.thumb.jpg.a7863fab1936f33b250d0bdeb4616f27.jpg

 

The fore deadwood and stemson where made from 15" boxwood sheet. The stepping line was done on the mill. There was no visible light coming through the joint prior to gluing.  Those clamps come in handy!

 

_DSC7014.thumb.jpg.21334d043edb7fec007843d5672dc5fb.jpg

 

_DSC7070.thumb.jpg.3b249e25f082d1df650188a02417e9b7.jpg

 

Mike

Edited August 26, 2017 by Stuntflyer

 I copied this from Mike (Stuntflyer) topic The Hayling Hoy

 

He tapered the aft end from 12" to 10".

the rabbit is 2 1/2" deep

 

I think that    "    means something else.

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50 minutes ago, luc said:

 I copied this from Mike (Stuntflyer) topic The Hayling Hoy

 

He tapered the aft end from 12" to 10".

the rabbit is 2 1/2" deep

 

I think that    "    means something else.

" = inches for a measurement.

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The measurement question is answered in that the ship was built using British feet and inches, ans measurement for the model are quoted in the same system.

 

Instead of driving yourself crazy converting measurements from duodecimal to metric and then dividing by 48, try to buy a scale ruler (on eBay or elsewhere) that has a 1:48 scale on it. Then you can measure everything directly.

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15 hours ago, druxey said:

The measurement question is answered in that the ship was built using British feet and inches, ans measurement for the model are quoted in the same system.

 

Instead of driving yourself crazy converting measurements from duodecimal to metric and then dividing by 48, try to buy a scale ruler (on eBay or elsewhere) that has a 1:48 scale on it. Then you can measure everything directly.

Firstly, I would like to thank you "Druxey" for forwarding me the missing Frame.(one problem less)
thank you very much !!

1387622852_20210214_1456261.thumb.jpg.f436f380abc78c228986894a68b0545e.jpg

 

 

Second I want to thank you, with the quote "converting measurements from duodecimal to metric and then dividing by 48"

 

Last year I took classes in Belgium to understand Ancre's monographs.

 

The teacher gave these documents as an extra, never thought I would use them, but they are now very useful.

 

 

259145479_20210214_1456381.thumb.jpg.0483031d7105709bc6873c13e1bce39e.jpg

 

Thank you very much again !

 

 

 

Edited by luc
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Be careful to use the good system !

The old French (Ancien Régime) inch equal 2,707 cm

The British inch is equal to 2,54 cm

The Ancre monograph refers to the old French inch

The table of conversion that you reproduced in your message seems to refer to the French system : 1 French inch (27,07 mm) divided by 48 gives 0,56

but the British inch (25,4 mm) divided by 48 gives 0,529 mm

As indicated by druxey, the  ship was built using British feet and inches.

You need to find a conversion table for the English system.

 

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1 hour ago, JpR62 said:

Be careful to use the good system !

The old French (Ancien Régime) inch equal 2,707 cm

The British inch is equal to 2,54 cm

The Ancre monograph refers to the old French inch

The table of conversion that you reproduced in your message seems to refer to the French system : 1 French inch (27,07 mm) divided by 48 gives 0,56

but the British inch (25,4 mm) divided by 48 gives 0,529 mm

As indicated by druxey, the  ship was built using British feet and inches.

You need to find a conversion table for the English system.

 

 

Thank you, now I know why my calculations would not add up, was already starting to doubt my own brains.
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As Druxey said buy an architects scale on eBay. Using full sized measurements, even if not ones you are familiar with, will eliminate a layer of potential error. After awhile you'll pick up this arcane system of measurement pretty quickly. Plus, when working with full sized numbers an alarm bell will go off in your head when your piece is way too small or large based on an errant calculation you made.

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1 hour ago, WalrusGuy said:

Hi Luc, any chance you can share the pdf for this frame? My plans also have the same issue where it has two of frame 7 and no AC5. 

 I don't think that druxey has a problem with this.

 

Going to find out to forward his mesages to you

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On 2/15/2021 at 4:02 AM, Mau said:

Guys, do you know why there is a frame number (3)? Is It the same frame 3? What are the numbers of the frames next to zero?

 

On 2/15/2021 at 4:16 AM, druxey said:

Any frame letter or number with brackets around it signifies that it is exactly the same as the dead flat.

 

Druxey : dead flat = the biggest frame, google give not a good translate.

 

 

I find it a good question of Mau

 

wich numbers next to 0.

 

where must come frame 1 and 2, wich side of the zero.

 

image.thumb.jpg.2e2e998b932503aa6cc88e67b6c69e2d.jpg
 

I numberd the frames, but what with frame 18 to 25.

 

???

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, druxey said:

By re-numbering the frames you are making things difficult for yourself. This letter/number system was the way old-time shipwrights did things, and there was always a good reason for it!

I have numbered the frames so that we can discuss the correct frame

I think that:

 

frame  17, 18, 19, 20 = frame 3 on the drawings

frame 21 = frame 2 on the drawings

frame 22 = frame 1 on the drawings

frame 23 = frame 0 on the drawings

frame 24,25 = frame A on the drawings


what do you think ( the forum) ?
 

 

 

Edited by luc
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