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I have been starting a little reading in Richard Endsor's book The Master Shipwright's Secrets and came across a drawing by Van De Velde the Elder of the Charles Galley 1676 a 32 gun fifth rate.   Between what I think would be the drift rail and the sheer rail appears to be vertical planking of some sort or perhaps balusters.  If this is planking I doubt that this would be the only planking as many pieces would be in the space between top timbers so my question is, would this be a decorative laminate, balusters  or something else that goes over the planking that would normally be  in this area?  

I would be grateful for a chance to see or hear of  any other contemporary information from members regarding this feature.

TIA

Allan

  1890952167_CharlesGalleyVanDeVelde1.JPG.ab0c0517008797f918d5caa3912d4bab.JPG

Edited by allanyed
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Interesting feature. I can't claim to be any authority on the period, but it looks like what is called "stave planking" and in such applications wasn't a rarity over the centuries, although more frequently seen in sharply curved forms, particularly on rounded sterns. It's not structurally strong, but it doesn't need to be. In the instance pictured, it does seems to be intentionally decorative. I do see the suggestions of what could be interpreted as "balusters," but I don' think that's likely. That would be a heck of a lot of balusters to turn, and for what purpose? I think interpretation would depend a lot upon the size of the drawing. The Van De Veldes' originals I've see are amazing in the level of detail they achieve, even at very small sizes. This appears to be a stand-alone pencil drawing and  not a cropped section from one of their trademark black and white "panorama" paintings. Perhaps the "staved" depiction may have been simply a shading technique he used?

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The following is  part of an email I received earlier today  after going over several oddities regarding the Charles Galley with Richard Endsor.  I had also asked about the the extra gun ports on a draught from NMM that does not coincide with the Van De Velde drawing or the gun establishment at that time.

 Allan

 As I remember the extra gunports were added to the gundeck following criticism by Henry Sheers.  The odd vertical lines shown by V de V on the Charles Galley are probably a result of her poor and very lightweight construction. The toptimbers are probably exposed with board filling the gaps between. That is my best guess.  

 

Edited by allanyed
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