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aliluke

HMS Fly by aliluke - Amati - 1/64

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Your last two pictures tell the whole story.

Well done, my friend. Keep up the good work and Sharon will love you for it.

 

Those details about coppering are amazing.

I used strips of copper foil on mine and they don't look anything like you have!!!!!

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Love the coppering Alistair! I've coppered a couple of models and know how tedious it can be....but with a good podcast the time can really fly by and the work become more meditative. In any case - beautifully done!

hamilton

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Alistair, she's really coming along.. Copper looks great, like the experiments. Also that does look really nice.the way the plates follow planks, love a good fluke, I.do a bit of that...

Anyway keep them posts coming and the great work.. Ollie

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Thanks all for your feedback. It helps me keep going.

 

The next step was the blue. I used Humbrol 157 mixed with a grey. I like it and will carry on with this. I also plan to have a strip of red below the cap rails as per B.E's Pegasus - I don't mean to follow him slavishly but I plan to ;)...

 

Hope you like my blue!

 

Cheers

Alistair

post-259-0-37225300-1395386118_thumb.jpg

Edited by aliluke

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Nice result Alistair, we're both just following what we see on those fine contemporary models of the Eighteenth Century, and I think you've nailed it :)

Beautiful finish.

 

B.E.

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Hi B.E

I'm flattered. Nigel Brook's blue was the one that tempted me to go darker but in in end it is all guess work? I looked at the contemporary models too but who knows. I'm glad you like my blue. I kind of wanted yours but with pots of blues around me, I went for my 157 mix. Thankfully I have lots left in the pot because I have no idea what else I put into it.

 

C

A

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Beautiful Alistair, you nailed it.  In case you are interested, I just recieved a book I splurged on - "The Sailing Frigate" by Robert Gardiner.  Its a small coffee table book and although it has some brief textual history of frigates from beginning of their lifetime to the end, the main rational for me buying was that it has a lot of beautiful photos of the contemporary models from the NMM (though bizarrely none of the Swan class).  Seeing all of these next to each other shows there was quite a lot of variation.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Sailing-Frigate-History-Ship-Models/dp/1848321600/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1395410718&sr=1-1&keywords=the+sailing+frigate

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I agree with Jason - the Gardiner book is a really nice book.  Not only as a read for the history of frigates, but also for the great quality pictures of the NMM models :)

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I'm going to chime in with the others, and sing the praises of that blue.  The addition of the grey makes for a deep, mellow tone that draws out the golden tone of the planking very nicely.  Best of all, it looks nice and smooth.

 

And if you're slavishly following BE, and I'm using you as a guide, then how does that work?  B)

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Dear Alistair,

I couldn’t resist in adding my comment on your superb “blue”.

After following B.E.’s inspirational Pegasus and then seeing the front cover of the cover of the 2012 Shipwright book,

I knew that this was the way I wanted to go (regarding the build and the paint choice) but had doubts on my decisions.

After seeing your recent posts however I know I have made the right decision and am experimenting with creating my own blue colour too.

I really hope that B.E.'s and your work, inspires more model boat builders to experiment with their colour schemes too rather than follow the suggested colour scheme on most builds. Anyway brilliant stuff, looking forward to more! Best wishes, Bettina

Edited by Bettina

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Thanks very much all. I discovered last night that I got the line of the blue wrong at the stem - too high. Going to take a bit of re-work but it should be fine.

 

Jason - I got that book for Christmas - it is an excellent source and I certainly studied the colour schemes which helped with my decisions.

 

Ken - I apply at least three thin costs of paint sanding with 1200 grit between coats. For Humbrol enamel I leave each coat to dry for at least six hours before sanding and recoating. After the last coat I rub it down with tissue paper - you can rub quite hard. Then I apply Testors Dullcote, rub that down with tissue paper and then re-coat and a final tissue paper rub until it achieves a light sheen. I also use a very good quality sable brush.

 

Cheers

Alistair

Edited by aliluke

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I have to agree with everyone in that the blue looks fantastic.  Not only in how it sets off everything but in the perfect finish you have achieved too.

 

May I ask if you used a brush or an airbrush?  Even zoomed in it is too good for me to tell :)

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Hi Bindy

Thank you. All my paint is applied with a paint brush :). If you look at my reply to Ken you can read the process of how I do it - nothing magical but very slow...If I was smart I'd put a coat on in the morning, dress it after lunch, recoat and dress that in the evening and then final coat before bed. That'd be all three coats in a day but I ain't that organised.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Hi Alistair,

 

You are doing a really fine job! Your plating a painting are beautiful.

 

You've left me in the dust since our AVS days :)

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Thanks Jim and David

Hi Jim - where is your Bluenose at? You favour me too much my friend, your work on your Bluenose is fantastic.

David, thanks - I'm a bit amazed by how much interest my paint work has generated - PM's received and comments here. It isn't magic so I've posted my technique in the Tips and Techniques  - Painting forum. Any one can do it.

 

Next is to prematurely age the copper using my weird idea  :o. We'll see how it goes, the copper is ready...

 

Cheers

Alistair

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OK. Here is how my urine ages copper.

 

First picture - the magic chemical.

 

Second picture - the first application - it tends to bead and is difficult/impossible to spread evenly.

 

Third Picture - after about five hours the verdigris is kicking in (not what I was looking for) but generally the copper has gone brown - that is what I was looking for!  Annoyingly my thorough clean has revealed that it isn't clean. There is one or two bright patches which will not age.

 

I have recoated for an overnight wait. We will see in the morning.

 

Cheers

Alistair

 

P.S The pictures are around the wrong way -

post-259-0-03426100-1395999658_thumb.jpg

post-259-0-59751600-1395999705_thumb.jpg

post-259-0-87696500-1395999755_thumb.jpg

Edited by aliluke

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It does make for a nice brown.  Am I right in thinking that the copper also becomes less shiny?

 

Interesting process.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Thanks Nigel, Martin

I left it overnight and here is the final result. There are some pesky little bits - probably glue residue - that didn't age at all. It is very difficult to detect these before the aging process. The brown overall is about the shade I hoped for and there is only the faintest hint of verdigris here and there. The finish still has a sheen but a coat of Dullcote should kill that. I guess I will try to fix some of the patches that didn't age.

 

Cheers

Alistair

post-259-0-81652400-1396038996_thumb.jpg

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Excellent work Alistair. Her bottom Makes it look like she's been aged in her majesty's collection at Greenwich since the regency era.

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Thanks Timmo

I've decided I'm not happy with the patina - to many flecks of copper that did not age. A quick run over with steel wool and it is all back to bright copper. I've realised the flecks that didn't age are not glue residue but the remainders of the protective coat that Amati must lay over the sheets of tile. I now know how to spot them but some are very hard to get off. If I did this all over I'd strip off that coat before coppering. I'm now in two minds about whether to do this aging trick again. Several here say that coppered hulls take forever to naturally age - Len, I think was one - and bright copper isn't a look that I like. In this regard I'm impatient. At least I know I can restore the hull back to bright copper in minutes if the patina isn't up to scratch. Opinions welcomed!

 

Cheers

Alistair

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 I like it Alistair, that brown tone is what I would aspire to also, and a hint of verdigris adds to the effect. Those tiny flecks of brightness are a nuisance but I think I might be tempted to give it another go, afterall there is no shortage of the aging fluid and as you say  it can be brought back to  the original state without too much trouble.

 

You are at the best time in the build to sort this, as with much more progress handling will become more difficult.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

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Thanks B.E

Your support is definitely one which will tempt me back to the loo for another chemical collection :P. I just need to rid the copper of those flecks of coating. Some are so hard to get at. The verdigris comes off with a light wash of water but in minutes returns - literally before your eyes. It suggests that the chemicals are still present even after cleaning. I think when I arrest the process with a lacquer finish what little hints of green that are there will stay. Will post again when I have another go. I'm very keen to get past coppering that is for sure!

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Keep up the experimentation Alistair. I'm relying on your efforts to ease the path for me when I get to something with a copper bottom....

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Hi

I realised I really need to hang the rudder so that I can copper then age the straps along with the hull. Working through that but I find it a nerve wracking aspect of the build so tend to walk away in fear of committing to glue. So I took a break and had a play with the PE brass decorations. Going from VII of the FFM I painted a piece to see how it came out. I have the luxury of having two PE sets - one for Fly and one for Pegasus so mistakes are allowed and I'm going to call this a mistake :(. I need a better fine brush and some thinners for the Humbrol paint. But still, with practice, I think I'll get there with this detail.

 

Here it is loose laid and I like the effect against the blue.

post-259-0-10379000-1396504571_thumb.jpg

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