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HMS Fly by aliluke - Amati - 1/64

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A good start Alistair, perhaps needs a little more highlighting and shadowing. I had several goes with mine and used Artists oils to provide the highlighting and shadowing over an enamel base colour. I did this once the etch had been fixed to the topsides. Beauty of it is you can keep tweaking the effect until you get the look you're after. :)

 

B.E.

Edited by Blue Ensign

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Thanks B.E

I'm inclined to do it off the model for fear of constant touch-ups and an unsteady hand. I have to get my head around the patterns which are much denser than the FFM ones. A new brush, thinners and the right mind set should be OK. I'm pleased that my treatment - lacquer thinners, acid, wash and primer have given really strong paint adhesion. I'll brush this back to bare metal and have another go. Meanwhile I've got to get those rudder straps on so I can get past coppering.

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Iooking good Alistair. I second what BE says about oils - even a dash of a neutral colour such as White will give the mix a longer setting time which will allow some blending of the various shades. Just don't overdo it as it's easy to end up with everything the same colour. Off model practice sounds good.

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Hi Alistair, that is some very fine paint work and finishing on your model.  It's amazing the quality you have achieved with some patience and technique - now I just need to slooooooow down :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I've starting aging the copper for the second time. The rudder straps are now on so they can be aged with the plates. Hardly any glue spots now but some plates age very differently from others and some quite strong areas of verdigris appear. These areas wash off very easily and will probably come off when I lacquer the hull but this leaves bright copper behind - not sure what  to do about this. I will give it another coat tonight and see how it looks in the morning. Pretty pleased with it so far but may go back to bright copper and natural aging if it is too patchy.

post-259-0-15370600-1397088856_thumb.jpg

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I think variation in aging between plates could be considered more natural and authentic.

Maybe try airbrushing or spraying dull lacquer, that will prevent removing any fragile aging patina.

 

Ken

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Thanks for the encouragement.

I gave it another soak overnight. Much more vigourous brushing in a circular motion in this application to get rid of the big patches of verdigris. It has come just as I hoped it would. A mid brown tone with hints of verdigris. Now have given it a wash and then two coats of Dullcote lacquer. Very pleased with the results! Very few bright patches - virtually none and a good composition to the colour. Any one with a bladder can do this!

 

So the sequence:

- Collect chemical in a little jar.

- Apply over bright copper prepared with acetone and brushed with 0000 steel wool.

- Try to keep the application even and wet over the course of a day.

- Apply another coat and leave overnight.

- Repeat applications the next day keeping the hull evenly wet.

- Apply at night with more vigourous circular motions to even out/distribute the verdigris and leave overnight.

- Wash off with water and pat dry with a paper towel or tissue paper - do not rub or you'll remove the patina.

- Apply lacquer to seal.

 

I now will be interested to see if the aging has been arrested or will continue. My test plate is a much darker brown a few weeks after being subjected to a similar approach.

 

I'm now looking forward to getting back to woodwork!

 

post-259-0-30125300-1397180203_thumb.jpg

post-259-0-47655000-1397180211_thumb.jpg

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I think your copper plates look pretty impressive.  They look like I would expect real plates to look.  Nothing in real live is uniform.  I agree with Ken (Barehook). 

Great model working.

Cheers.

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A RESULT!!!  exactly the effect and toning I had in my minds eye Alistair.

 

Questions will now be asked by wives all around the world, why are you peeing into that jar, you're going to do what - ugh gross.

 

A couple of things come to mind.

 

Did you paint the solution on or dab it on with a tissue.

How many times during the course of a day did you  re-wet it, presumably it runs off quite quickly.

Did you spray the laquer on or paint it.

 

I'm very tempted, I wonder if it would work on my already evenly tarnished copper.

 

B.E.

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Thanks all

Of course a ship has two sides so now I've started the next.

 

B.E - all of the applications are with big soft brushes and I re-wet it every hour or so. The chemical stays wet for a very long time (much longer than water) and where it accumulates is where you get the most intense verdigris. I think leaving it longer and repeating applications makes it work - a 48 hour process. Swishing it around with a stiffer brush in a circular motion evens things out. The lacquer is also brush applied and I don't polish anything between coats - it would risk removing the patina. All that said, I'd be very afraid of doing your hull at the stage you are at because some plates just don't take the aging agent for no reason I can see before I start the process. These have to be individually retreated with steel wool and then resoaked. I wouldn't try this if I had as much detail built above the waterline as you do.

 

I guess use my technique at your own risk. As it was my wife who suggested it, we don't have any gross out moments between us but I can say I'm sick of the smell of my own pee. A couple more days to go...

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Asparagus would be interesting Ken :D . My agent is generally informed by coffee, joghurt, cereal and lemon juice. A mid-morning pee being the most powerful concentration and the easiest to control.

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Thank you Nigel and Bob

You two are at the pinnacle of this art and your appreciation is much appreciated.  Bob - you should try it. It works and is the cheapest chemical out there.

 

One more soak to go tomorrow night on the starboard side then I can clean up and throw away the pee. The rudder copper refuses to co-operate (is that a pun?) - bright areas everywhere which will not age for no reason that I can fathom. It will be brought into line... :angry:

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I have to admit I have spent days following your log trying hard not to ask the question "what do you really mean by pee"? 

 

But I have finally convinced myself that you are 100% serious and it is not a synonym or joke word.  Ok, ok, I might be slow hahaha.

 

Despite all of that the final effect is truly amazing.  I love the coppering on ships but I really don't like the bright, and shiny copper colour.  Thank you for the pictures, descriptions and clear explanations enough times that it finally sunk in for me.  Eeww no pun intended there!

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Hi Bindy

Yep a 100% pee. To save you, and others screwing up their noses at this thought, I will now refer to it as "the chemical". It is just another chemical and while it is unpleasant to use, many are. It is also an experiment that I think is a success. Blue Ensign pointed me to the NNM model of Bellona which is coppered and has a brown, almost wood, colour below the waterline. The chemical gets it there in just two days.

 

Except for returning to the rudder at a later date, still too many bright bits, I've finished now. The starboard side is a bit different from the port. More verdigris and darker with less hints of copper. I think I applied more of "the chemical" more frequently and left it rest for longer. I don't mind though, I'm happy with either side. Another wee trick is that "the chemical" tends to wick into the woodwork - a bit of a bug as it carries the stain of the copper aging into the wood. Cleaning with water soaked cotton buds seems to fix this but I have to do more clean-ups.

 

Lacquering the hull after aging is a must. I'm waiting to see if this completely arrests the aging process but I suspect (hope) it does.

 

I have now completely cleaned my work bench and it does smell really good again - just like chemicals! Here is the starboard side. Glad to be past this copper stuff that is for sure.

post-259-0-46573800-1397441082_thumb.jpg

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Alistair,

The starboard side looks great. Not sure I have the nerve to try your chemical but the results are impressive. I'm very interested to see how it all turns out. What do you plan to lacquer the plating with?

Dave B

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Hi Dave

The plating is lacquered with Testors Dullcote. It cuts the shine and is very easy to apply by brush. Up to three coats now on each side and may do a forth. It also takes back the verdigris a bit which is what I wanted.

 

There is no nerve needed to use "the chemical". It is just another liquid and it sure does quickly age copper in the way I wanted. Just paint it on with a brush and you are on the way. Courage is not required.

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Such skill Alistair, you've even managed to incorporate the subtle differences between the weather side and lee side of the hull in the degree of patination, great result.

 

B.E.

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Lol you don't need to change the name!  The results sure than make up for any doubts, it just looks SO GOOD!

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Thanks Bindy - I shall stick to the chemical formula "PEE" from now on.

 

I 'm struggling away with the mouldings that run along the hull and ruining my paintwork in the process. Aligning these is a real trick. For relief I decided to add some more detail to the quarter badge - my Easter egg. The lower part in red with a black button at the bottom and a white "go faster" stripe with gold braid above. Be interested in opinions - the first version is way back at the beginning of the log and kind of looked too plain on the lower sill as the PE brass could not be bent around this. No historic accuracy here - entirely made up. What do you think? I quite like it, I think...(the photo is super magnified and the badge is loose laid and at the wrong angle). Easily reversed if opinions are against it!

post-259-0-15455600-1397795792_thumb.jpg

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