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aliluke

HMS Fly by aliluke - Amati - 1/64

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Hi

On the basis of warnings, I further reinforced the false main deck. In truth I found it quite easy to install and the split deck worked really well for me. When I got a good fit I just angled the false deck up and applied glue to the bulkheads and then slid it back down. Where there was any lift above the frames I added a bit of CA and handheld until fixed. There was a bit of a centre ridge, easy sand off, but otherwise she was just fine. The fit of the parts of this kit really impresses me.

 

Started deck planking but I won't take this very far at all, access doesn't seem to be an issue, so next I'll take on the plywood formers for the gunports/bulkheads. This is the bit that scares me... but I've taken on board the many logs out there for how to reduce the fear!

 

Cheers

A

 

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Nice job on the false deck install!

 

And good to know I wasn't the only one that had to deal with a ridge down the centre. I was going to suggest doing the deck planking anyway, before the gunport patterns, but I see what I think might be a margin plank pencilled in on your false deck, so you'll be fine either way.... ;)

 

As for the gunport pattern, there is really nothing for it, but to bite the bullet and get on with it (honestly, it scared the $h!# out of me too :P ). It probably is the most critical piece of the whole hull build, but if you can put up with all the f***ing around that you need to do to fit it correctly, after it's done... you'll wonder why you worried so much over it. :rolleyes:

 

Good luck with your next steps

 

Andy

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Well have fun with the gunport strips!

 

You will have gathered from the logs by now that the forrard ones need to be displaced back a little.

 

But otherwise - soak, bend, clamp, dry and then do it over and over.

 

You really can get nearly a perfect fit if you persevere.

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Hi Alistair,

 

Good job indeed on the deck! I guess my kit was an old box: my false deck did come in one piece... but I cut it in the middle to install it.

I've nothing to add to Spyglass' advice for the gunport patterns... just be sure to have enough clamps and dive in! :P

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Nice progress Alistair, I did the majority of my deck planking before I installed the gunport patterns.

 

003.JPG

 

It's  a universal truth you just simply can't have enough clamps for this part of the build ;)

 

Lots of trial fitting and level measurements across the two patterns when you come to fit the second. I also found it useful to have a gun made up to check the fit thro' the ports, to guard against the barrel being too close to the top of the port.

 

Good luck and cheers,

 

B.E.

 

 

 

 

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Buy more clamps!!

 

The " S" shape of the gunport strip (pic on my log) helps to get everything fitting nicely and using clamps and packing to impose that curve helps a lot.. The bottom edge can be a pain but I found that a bit of "finger pressure adjustment" can just make the last nice fit

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There is no such thing as too many clamps when shaping the gunport strips. ;)

 

I had a bit of a problem with "wobbles" on the bottom edge of my gunport strips, but I waited until I had the first plank on and by careful re-wetting, glueing and clamping to the first plank, the worst of the wobbles where dealt with and the rest could be sanded out.

 

Andy

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Yes Andy's technique of placing - even temporarily pinned - the first plank give you a curve to match the bottom edge to.

 

But the secret is to keep refining the curve in all directions.

 

I forgot to mention that even moving the "jigsaw" joint back a bit, the  front strip can still need a bit of trimming at the stem depending upon how well you have shaped the edges of the forward few bulkheads

 

Attached is a pic of my build just at first plank and you can see the join strip to plank required only a touch of filler

 

post-905-0-60418400-1376486285_thumb.jpg

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Hi all and thank you for the advice.

 

I've done one the plywood patterns and with three, so far, wet dry fits it is nearly hugging the hull. I've added some blocks to the bulkheads below the false deck so that I have something to clamp to and will use these to pull the lower edge in for the next wet/dry fit.

 

Meanwhile progressing deck planking and making the hatch frames. This was my first experience of using boxwood and I can see the appeal. The hatch frame has boxed corners and ledges added to the coamings. The upper edge is rounded at the corners and the overall upper frame is slightly rounded to match the deck camber. I'm butting my deck planks to the hatch frames which makes them stand up less from the deck. The fit is very tight.

 

I'd feel pretty pleased with myself if it weren't for the fact the centreline plank of the deck was slightly off centre! The planking on the portside has strayed to the starboard...No easy fix, I think I will just slightly thin several of the starboard planks until I loose the 0.7mm or so of drift.

 

Attached some pictures. The deck looks messy - using 3B lead pencil for caulking - it will clean up just fine. Also everything looks a lot more yellow than it is. The planking butt next to the fore hatch corner is probably a mistake, position wise, but...too late.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Nice hatch !

And the gunport curve looks spot on.  Its nice when you realise it actually WILL fit!

Edited by SpyGlass

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Thanks Steve, B.E

 

I had one question B.E - did you butt the deck planks to the hatch frames or lay the hatches over the planks?

 

I'm sure you've all seen this before but here is my Lego brick jig to ensure the frames are perfectly square. The white glue doesn't stick to the bricks so very easy to pop out when the glue has set. This is the main hatch frame.

 

Cheers

Alistair

post-259-0-90873500-1376877416_thumb.jpg

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Now thats clever - I didnt realise that the width of the hatch was 4  "lego" units.   Or did you cheat and use  packing!

 

I am due to have my knee operation this afternoon but now I am raking my bits and pieces box for lego instead of packing dressing gown etc !

Edited by SpyGlass

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Hi Steve

The main part is the T-square, two dark grey pieces fixed to the right angle with the white piece. I use this for the first fix of two parts. On the first fix I use another piece pushed into the right angle from the inside of the frame. I let the glue dry but leave it still fixed to the T-square part. The remaining two parts are held in place by the other bricks but these are disconnected from the T-square bricks. With gentle pressure the bricks glue to the frame and you can force absolute square. This means you don't have to build to Lego sizes, any size will fit, to get a very accurate, very cheap (free, my kids won't notice...) and easy jig.

 

Cheers

Alistair

 

Had to edit - good luck with the knee operation!

Edited by aliluke

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Hatches usually don't overlay the planks. So for modeling I do it this way too. This also avoid the sanding of the needed deck rounding in the bottom of the hatches and I can show the caulking.

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Hi Alistair, a neat little jig you have there.

 

I planked the deck first and then fitted the made up hatchway coamings/head ledges afterwards. I suppose fitting the hatchways first and planking up to them is the more authentic way, I went for the soft option.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

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B.E., that clamp sculpture gave me a good laugh, sure there are never enough of them as long as they're not chinese made, cause they break like pretzels. 

Nice to see another Swan class progressing. They say there is never enough of them, but I can see they are a bit scarce to-day. So, Aliluke, keep her busy, she's a nice one. 

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Ingenious and inspiring as usual Alistair. If you want some extra clamps I'll send some down to you - no shipping charge!!

hamilton

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Thank you for your replies and encouragement. That is a very generous offer Hamilton - thanks. I've bought a big pack of spring clamps and think I have enough now - more than I can apply at one time.

 

I've decided to always reply on my log with at least one photo. The deck progress is slow mainly because butting the planks to the hatch frames is a pain in the butt! It is also very easy for the shorter planks to drift off line which means they then need re-doing. Now I'm past the hatches and the alignment is very good it is speeding up. The margin plank is the next challenge. The deck here is still dirty and the hatch frames are not dressed. I redid the fore hatch frame as I decided I'd rounded the corners too much for the scale.

 

Cheers

Alistair

 

 

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Alistair,

The deck is looking nice, what width planks are you using for that scale and what are you using for the deck caulking?

 

I like the legos idea, btw there is a smaller scale of newer legos i've seen that might be usefull as well, they are sold in architechtural kits of buildings and such.

 

Ken

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Thanks Ken - the B&W was an accident but I thought I'd post it anyway.

 

I've now finished has much deck planking as possible allowing for the removal of the bulkhead tabs midships. I've given the deck its first dressing and aside from one less than fully tight joint I'm feeling good about the outcome.

 

Now my question: Should I treenail the deck? At this scale treenails probably should be invisible but it does add a nice detail. What is difficult is getting good alignment - misaligned nails look bad - so there is some risk involved too. Opinions welcomed.

 

While I contemplate I'm doing the gratings and then will dress the hatches - rounded to the deck camber and very slightly rounded corners.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Hi Alistair:

 

Looks great! As for the treenails, I think it depends on the level of detail you have in your mind for this build. When I added treenails to the Glad Tidings, I used a piece of string fastened across the deck with tape at the ends as a guide. This helped with alignment. But the Glad Tidings is at 1/25 scale - very large and therefore not too tricky to do the treenails with some toothpicks (which is what I used). At 1/64 scale I think you could do it, painstaking as it might be. I would be tempted to do it myself.....others may think differently

hamilton

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nice planking - I think I preferred nails each side of a butt.

I drill the nail holes before fitting. mainly t avoid a problem that I found with the kit that the bulwark angle with th deck doesn't allow an easy drill if you fit the port strips before planking. it is also. useful to remember r

this access problem and mark and drill the inner bulwark planks for the gun tackles rings before fitting.

Edited by SpyGlass

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Glad to see you're going for it Alistair - and as usual, you've outdone me in efficiency and elegance - why use string and tape when you can just use tape! I'll switch to this method next time.

hamilton

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Thanks for all the tips
I've drilled almost all the treenail holes in preparation for filling them with a wood paste concoction which will make them nearly invisible...My choice of location of the beam lines including the butt positions is vaguely made up. I reckon there are about 1000 holes. Filling will be easier than drilling. The hatch after the main hatch is dressed the others are still raw.

Next is the capstan base and the main mast partners and then...no excuses left now, planking the hull. Gulp.

Cheers
Alistair

post-259-0-72884500-1395645314_thumb.jpg

Edited by aliluke

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