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Australia - If the crocs and spiders don't get you, the possums will . . .


Louie da fly
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Going back  to creatures on the golf course, I took the following on the 13th fairway at our golf course in Ave Maria, FL.   

https://youtu.be/AaQA8zKLKOU 

The next one was another big boy that came from the 17th hole, across the street to our next door neighbor's then to our yard and to the lake behind our house.  Guess he thought the fishing would be better at our pond.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GGLU5NAS24&list=PL1V0Rw_IUxGwKJViSoW6ja8B3mOQMzqwc

Allan

Edited by allanyed
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16 minutes ago, Jim Lad said:

Allan; and you Americans reckon Australia has problems with dangerous animals? :o

 

John

Seems like Oz is full of dangerous critters and all are out to kill humans.  But I'm taking that from what I read here.   We have our share of them also.   So much for talking about politicians... the animals are nasty also.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water..........

 

I was watching the birds on the waterbird refuge at Homebush (Sydney suburb) when a Grey Teal (type of duck) came in for a slow landing an almost immediately disappeared under the water in a great splash, neve to be seen again.  I assume it was one of the very large eels that inhabit the pond that got her!

 

You can just see the speckled brown of the duck at the left of the base of the splash as she goes under.

 

John

 

615740325_149608-GreyTealHomebush.thumb.JPG.c715739923579c03ba8dac4960f956a5.JPG

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I see on the internet news this morning a Magpie somehow killed a baby in Australia. What the hell ? First dingos and now magpies. The magpies must be the size of ostriches.

OK, I went back and read the article. The magpie was swooping on the mom and the mom tripped and fell on the baby resulting in head injuries to the baby. A very sad story.  

Edited by reklein
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The ant photo fascinated me so I did a little reading up.   Turns out there are nearly a 100 species of bull ants in Oz. Why am I not surprised?  The following is the jist of the story. 

Bull ants also have well-developed vision and will follow or even chase an intruder a good distance from the nest. Usually the sight of large aggressive ants streaming out of the nest is enough to prompt a hasty retreat. (Ed. Who would have thought of that??) If not, the ants deliver painful stings by gripping the intruder with their mandibles (jaws), curling their abdomen to reveal the sting and injecting the victim with venom. Often multiple stings are delivered.

 

Now when it comes to ants, ours are pretty small compared to a 20mm bull ant and we do share one nasty species with Australia, the  Solenopsis invicta Buren better known as the red Imported fire ant.  They are no picnic,  ask my neighbor after they put him in the hospital for two days after falling on a fire ant mound and they got all over him, including ears, nose, arms, legs, and yes,  in his shorts.    

 

I see a future horror movie in the making, AaAAA.   American and Australian Ant Attack.     

Allan

AaAAA.JPG.f2db72b66a1196554a164433c5ca98a9.JPG

 

 

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 I'm glad here ants aren't nasty like the Aussie ones, just tiny black ones.  Luckily, no fire ants in southern Oregon.  They've invaded my kitchen again, currently eating the ant bait I have spread about by the window.  Must be the heat and smoke as this is 3rd time this year.  I do keep a clean kitchen that any Mess NCO would be proud of.

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In practice, bull ants aren't really a problem unless you're walking in the bush and aren't looking where you're going.  Just don't stand on one of their nests - believe me, I know! :o

 

More of a practical pests are green ants - just a few millimeters long with a dark green abdomen.  They're pretty common in city gardens and you usually don't even see them until they sting you - a bit like a bee sting, but not as severe.  At least they're not aggressive.

 

John

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12 hours ago, reklein said:

I see on the internet news this morning a Magpie somehow killed a baby in Australia.

Yes it's the fear people have that causes tragic deaths, this is the second in a few years. A cyclist in Wollongong swerved to avoid attack, crashed and his head hit a rock, he died at the scene. Realistically though, if you wear a hat they can't hurt you, just keep walking and you'll leave their domain. The answer is in the good book, The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy, DON'T PANIC! This also applies to spiders and snakes ( good old song by the way ) but is not particularly helpful in the case of crocodile attack.

 

I knew a bloke years ago that was working on a sugar plantation up north, staying in a farm hut. Came home from the pub on friday night, saw a huge huntsman on the wall above his bed, 410 shotgun, spider gone! Overkill I grant you, but effective.

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Greg, Now that was not funny.  You sucked me right in and I went looking for Thylarctos plummetus  not knowing it is a hoax to scare would be goofball tourists like me.  If those suckers were real I would definitely take Oz off my bucket list.  Jumping spiders, giant spiders, jumping ants, giant poisonous brown snakes, dingos, crocs, aren't enough, you folks have to make up a new species that looks like a teddy bear that attacks!!  Maaannnnn  that is soooo mean.

Allan

 

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8 hours ago, RGL said:

Not a single one of you have mentioned Dropbears

 

6 hours ago, allanyed said:

Greg, Now that was not funny.  You sucked me right in and I went looking for Thylarctos plummetus  

Allan, maybe we should send Greg out to hunt the giant Adirondack Snipe.  Now that is a creepy creature. 😳

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1 hour ago, allanyed said:

Jack,

I have not been on a snipe hunt since my first time at camp over 60 years ago.   These were Allegheny Mountain snipe and I think they may be extinct as they were impossible to find even back then.

Allan

 

Word has it that the snipes of all sub-species are not extinct.  They have just mastered the art of not being seen.

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1 hour ago, allanyed said:

These were Allegheny Mountain snipe and I think they may be extinct 

Oh I think there may be enough of them left to keep Gregg busy traipsing thru the Alleghenies for a while. 😉😉   Probably hiding out in the Zoar Valley among all the ancient trees. 

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