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Clipper d'Argenteuil by G.L. - POF - scale 1/12 - SMALL


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2 hours ago, Backer said:

It took a while for my poor mind to understand all this 😉
Ingenious system, a nice tool

Indeed a nice tool, Patrick. All credit goes to Mr Orsel, it took also a while for my poor mind to understand it on the Marine & Modélisme d'Arsenal forum.

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I'm afraid it is getting a bit monotonous, but also this week I can show nothing but pictures of the planks. From now on I alternately place a plank at the top and one at the bottom.
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I hope to close the gap in my next post.

 

Thank you very much for reading this log, for your likes and for all your interesting reactions.

 

Till next week!

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Only one more strake to place.
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The last one will probably be the hardest one because this one has to fit at both sides. No need to calculate any more, I can measure the width immediately between the two planks.
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The last plank fits surprisingly well.
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Time to tackle the portside.
I don't know if you remember that I intend to place only a couple strakes at the port side to give an clear view of the inside of the hull after the example of the model of Mr. Orsel.
I start with the strake just below the wale.
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Now I divide the space between the two extreme strakes by three and that gives me the location of the only two planks which will be added.
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Planking is completed:132.thumb.JPG.45b56664d2ac2afd37f435ef4836af40.JPG

 

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Thank you very much for reading this log, for your likes and for all your encouraging reactions.

 

Till next week!

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Just found this build G.L. and I have read it from the beginning.  Like your previous logs, it is packed with simple and innovative techniques.  The bow sander makes so much sense and I'm surprised I haven't seen that idea used before, but I will be trying it.   I also like your frame lamination method - nifty.  And thanks for showing us the details of  Mr. Orsel's strake cutting sled which is a perfect tool for hulls of this shape.

 

Excellent work G.L. and I will be watching for future updates.

 

Gary

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Congratulations GL, fantastic work.

This last plank on the starboard side, this was no easy task. It is much easier to fit planks as you go with no limitation on the one edge rather than making a plank to fit a gap. Very well done!

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On 6/20/2021 at 3:56 PM, FriedClams said:

Just found this build G.L. and I have read it from the beginning.  Like your previous logs, it is packed with simple and innovative techniques.  The bow sander makes so much sense and I'm surprised I haven't seen that idea used before, but I will be trying it.   I also like your frame lamination method - nifty.  And thanks for showing us the details of  Mr. Orsel's strake cutting sled which is a perfect tool for hulls of this shape.

 

Excellent work G.L. and I will be watching for future updates.

 

Gary

Welcome on this log, Gary and thank you for your compliments.

 

On 6/20/2021 at 7:08 PM, vaddoc said:

Congratulations GL, fantastic work.

This last plank on the starboard side, this was no easy task. It is much easier to fit planks as you go with no limitation on the one edge rather than making a plank to fit a gap. Very well done!

 Thanks, Vaddoc.

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Posted (edited)

8. Floor timbers
The hull is now liberated from the building board, the inside is free accessible to work in it.  This week I am making the floor timbers.
The floor timbers are not only reinforcements for the hull, but most of them are also the base for the bottom boards. That means that their bottom must have as much as possible the shape of the inside of the hull and that the top of those on which will lay the bottom boards must be at equal and correct height to form stabile base for the boards.

To determine the inside shape of the hull where the floor timbers will be placed, I use a piece of thick solder.
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That can be pressed in hollow shape of the hull.
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I trace the shape onto stiff paper for both sides and cut them out. I glue them together with another piece of stiff paper just on top of the keelson (red marking, I was a bit lazy in making pictures). A vertical lath, attached to a horizontal lath which can be moved along the hull at a constant height helps to determine the height of the floor timber.
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The floor timber can now be sawn ...
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... fitted and glued.
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All floor timbers placed.
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Thank you very much for reading this log, for your likes and for all your kind reactions.

 

Till next week!

 

Edited by G.L.
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This week, I varnished the hull. It took a week to do so because I had to give five or six layers before I was happy with the result. Between every layer the  hull was sanded with fine sand paper.
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Sanded between two varnishes.
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A new layer laid.
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It is always a bit dark in the workshop, therefore some pictures in the living room where the light is better.
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Thank you very much for reading this log and for your likes.

 

Till next week!

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On 7/3/2021 at 6:57 PM, Roger Pellett said:

A great job on a difficult subject with those tiny frames.

 

Roger

 

On 7/4/2021 at 8:23 AM, Backer said:

Very nice work 👍

 

7 hours ago, GrandpaPhil said:

Very cool model!  Very nicely done!

 

Thank very much for your kind comments, Roger, Patrick and Phil

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Posted (edited)

9. Centerboard Case and Centerboard
The centerboard case is built on two beams with a recess for side boards at each side.
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When the side boards are glued, it can be fitted in the hull.
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Now the case fits, the cover plate can be glued.
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At this stage I don't glue the centerboard case into place yet.
The center board is sawn from an 1.5 mm aluminum plate.
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Fitting the board and checking if it can be lowered and hauled smoothly.
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The centerboard is painted in black. I use a cardboard box as a spray booth (the centerboard is hanging in it on a metal wire. A bit hard to see on the photo).
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Edited by G.L.
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Posted (edited)

10. Bottom boards
I start with gluing the stringer at the starboard side. At port side (the open side) the bottom boards will not be placed.
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Starting to puzzle the bottom boards. The boards are still all loose, I use a weight to keep them in place during the measurement.
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While making the bottom boards I glued the thwart risings already into place at both sides.
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The boards are complete. The only have to be glued and the back still has to be cut straight.167.thumb.JPG.5fdaeae14d40069a7b34950323ed75a0.JPG

 

Thank you very much for reading this log, for your likes and for all your encouraging reactions.

 

Till next week!

Edited by G.L.
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11. Thwart
The outsides of the thwart are laying on a rising. The risings are made of ebony.
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More to midship the thwart is supported by support beams.  The two front beams do not run the full width of the hull, but are interrupted in the middle. I leave them whole for the sake of working for now.
With the bottom boards (center board case removed):
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Without the bottom boards:
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The support beams rest on a strut. Making a template to saw the strut.
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The forward struts placed provisionally.
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The rear support beam runs from side to side and is supported in the middle by a pillar. Turning the ebony pillar with the lathe.
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The three support beams with pillar and struts. I repeat: the two forward beams will be interrupted in the middle.
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The thwart will be made of mahogany, I make a template to saw it out. Determining the shape of the hull sides. First at one side:
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then also the other side:
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I draw the shape of the thwart on the template with the help of an improvised light box.
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Here the thwart is glued and sawn. Fitting it.
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I want to finish the curved inside of the thwart with a thin frame. To give the frame its curved shape, I make an improvised bending iron. I secure a can on the workbench and aim the paint burner in the can. The wet frame can now easily be bent round the can into the desired shape in two directions.
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The frame is now glued in place on the thwart.
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The center of the two front support beams is now cut away.
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Fitting the finished thwart. Nothing (neither bottom boards nor thwart) is glued yet.186.thumb.JPG.3a8651af4e6eedf8425c60a4808602bf.JPG

 

Thank you very much for reading this log and for for your likes.

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Posted (edited)

12. Cockpit coaming.
The cockpit coaming has to be integrated in the deck beams. Before making it I will lay first the two adjacent deck beams. Therefore I have to glue the beam clamps first. I learned from my experience with the wales that bent ebony transmits great pressure to the model (post 43), so I do not make the deck clamp from ebony, but from cherry. I will stain it black later.

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I saw the deck beams out of 3 mm thick ebony. They are sawn manually with the help of a paper template glued on the wood.
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The deck beams sit in notches in the beam clamps. The notches are sawn with a small metal saw blade. a piece of cardboard protects the thwart.
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The two deck beams bounding the cockpit coaming.
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The cockpit coaming has an oval shape. It will be made by laminating three layers of mahogany veneer. I saw the laminating mold of a piece of waste wood.
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Presenting the mold on the model.
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Gluing the three layers veneer.
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When the glue is dry I saw out the coaming...
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... and I sand the edges.
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Round the bottom side of the cockpit coaming lays a round deck beam. It is also made by laminating four strips of veneer round the coaming.
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The beam will consist of two half rings. Here it is like it comes off the mold; it still has to be sanded, sawn to size and re-stained in black.200.thumb.JPG.026e2147424d0f3f1951209ae7e1e84a.JPG

Edited by G.L.
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Fitting the coaming. In the beam round the coaming the dove tails notches for the deck beams are already made.
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At the front of the coaming is a shelf that serves as a pin rail. Making the pin rail.
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In front of the pin rails there are passage holes through the coaming for the halyards and sheet. They are protected against scouring with a piece of brass pipe.
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Gluing the pin rail.
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...and re-fitting the coaming.
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Now the coaming can be varnished. Note that there are also two extra pin holders in the coaming. In the photo you can see the starboard one.208.thumb.JPG.cfaad05bce6a35ba3b34bbc040c5927a.JPG

 

Thank you very much for reading this log, for your likes and for your encouraging reactions.

 

Till next week!

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Posted (edited)

I start this week with finishing the coaming area. The attachment points of the coaming to the deck beams are reinforced with knees.
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At each side of the coaming come five short deck beams. The notches for the dove tails of the beams were already cut before the round beam clamp was glued to the coaming.
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The coaming with the port beams glued.
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Fitting the coaming on the model. I will wait to glue it definitively until all deck beams with accessories are made.

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Edited by G.L.
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Posted (edited)

13. Mast tabernacle
There are many bridges across the Seine, which is why it is useful that the mast of the clipper can be lowered and raised again by the crew. This is done by means of a hoist system with three sheaves in the mast base and two shaves at the bottom of the hull of the boat.
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Making the two sheaves for the fixed part.
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The different pieces.
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Assembling the pieces.
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Fitting it in the hull
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Edited by G.L.
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14. Step of the mast and peripherals
Assembling the step of the mast. There are two pairs of holes running through the mast step (which now have nails through). The top holes are for the pivot spindle around which the mast can tilt, the bottom one for the pin to lock the mast.
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Fitting the step of the mast. Now that the bottom nail has been removed, you can see that the holes for the spindles have been reinforced with a piece of brass tube.
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The step of the mast and the mast erecting sheaves. The center board case is taken away to give a clear view.
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Overview:224.thumb.JPG.21aad7f0cbb2641b25fba4fe0beae39e.JPG

Thank you very much for reading this log and for your likes .

 

Till next week!

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I think Håkan is right, the term 'tabernacle' also came to my mind. In other languages, e.g. German it is als called a 'mast-stool'.

 

Otherwise I silently follow the evolution of this project. I find the choice of dark wood a bit sombre, but really like what you are doing with it !

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On 8/5/2021 at 9:01 AM, Wintergreen said:

Great progress GL!

 

The word tabernacle comes to mind for the "mast erection" part. I don't know if that is correct or not.

 

Cheers!

Thank you, Hakan. Tabernacle sounds indeed a lot better than my term. I will edit my log.

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On 8/5/2021 at 9:50 AM, wefalck said:

I think Håkan is right, the term 'tabernacle' also came to my mind. In other languages, e.g. German it is als called a 'mast-stool'.

 

Otherwise I silently follow the evolution of this project. I find the choice of dark wood a bit sombre, but really like what you are doing with it !

 

On 8/6/2021 at 8:08 PM, FriedClams said:

Very nice progress G.L.

 

Gary

Eberhard and Gary, thank you very much for your interest and your complements.

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