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Ok, so this is my very first build, and here's what I've learned so far.  This is going to be harder than i thought, but surprisingly enjoyable, trying to do this.  Also, I've confirmed I am not a perfectionist!  (this could be a blessing or a curse!)
 
Step 1:  I thought I'd try the harder beginning, that is, gluing the 3 bottom planks together.  Apparently I took the instructions to "prepare & sand" the planks too literally, because they don't fit flush together.  Not to worry, I used an enormous amount of glue trying to get them to stick.  I tried to wipe off the excess with a brush and water, but that seemed to just water down the glue, and the pieces would not bind.  So I used isopropyl alcohol, dismantled everything, and tried again.  No such luck, but i found that if i placed the pieces together, ran a bead of glue over the top and let it sink in-between the planks, it might hold.  As you can see in the photo, although it is "holding", there is daylight between the planks!  Although catastrophic if at sea, (and I'm trying to build an "authentic" boat), I went ahead and attached the cleats (one of which is too long), just for practice.   Oh, I also found that a toothpick works well in removing excess glue.  Not sure if that's the right way to do this, but its working for me!
 
I've decided to call this a 'trial run" for me to practice on, and I will now use the "backup" one-piece bottom to continue (because this first try might fall apart during the rest of the build) but at least I am learning!  
 
Next post will hopefully show a completed step one (one-piece bottom of boat with cleats!)   
Showing my failed trial run here... (not sure why my pics are coming out upside-down!) 
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This is a good kit for the beginner ship modeler.  You will learn a lot of skills that will help you in future builds.  You can click on the tag that is below the title of your build log and it will bring up all of the build logs for the Lowell Grand Banks Dory that you can use as a reference for your build.

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9 minutes ago, Ryland Craze said:

This is a good kit for the beginner ship modeler.  You will learn a lot of skills that will help you in future builds.  You can click on the tag that is below the title of your build log and it will bring up all of the build logs for the Lowell Grand Banks Dory that you can use as a reference for your build.

Thanks Ryland, that's good to know!  I found a few build logs but I imagine there's many more!  The ones I found have been helpful for me to visualize what this is supposed to look like!

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As a relative newcomer myself don't try to build a museum quality masterpiece first time out, do the best work you can and it will be a great learning experience! Enjoy your progress and ask any and all questions, I have received great advice and help from experienced members here. As to sanding, druxey gave great advice, I have found that a flat piece of sandpaper will lie fine on a flat surface without rubber cement although it will certainly help! Another thing I have found is that when sanding a long surface like the planks in your photo I unintentionally tend to apply a bit more pressure to one end so I reverse them during the process to try and get both ends level. Good luck, I look forward to following your build!

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I finished steps 1, 2 and 3, but having trouble inserting my pics (they are upside down!)  Any ideas? 

 

I also uploaded the pictures to postimage.org (where they were automatically rotated correctly), but I don't know how to get them from postimage.org into this blog!

 

Asking for help - need advice!  Thanks!

 

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Welcome to MSW and enjoy the ride. I learned from doing the Grand Banks Dory and take a break from a larger model. One of the things I learned was to save my sawdust and mix it with glue as a filler paste (David Antscherls hint) and I have started using it almost daily.

 

Again Welcome aboard

Stay Well and Stay Safe

Will :pirate41:

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Thanks everyone, for the tips!  Ok, I THINK i've figured out the photo issues.  Here goes!

I've finished steps 1, 2 and 3.  I may be overdoing this blog but I've decided to post everything I'm doing along the way, with my thoughts along with it!

So step 1 – using the one-piece bottom, I was able to get the cleats attached (this went fairly well)

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I still can’t really understand how to use “water & brush” to remove excess glue, but my toothpick seemed to work for me!

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Step 2 adding the stem. I had to redo this a couple times.  Glue didn’t seem to be holding.

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In the forward view, it looks a bit crooked to me, but I’m hoping its just the camera angle!

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Next came the transom, stern knee, and stern cleat. I did the transom and the stern knee first, and then realized I had forgotten the stern cleat. But it seemed to turn out ok.

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Side view

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The next step went ok...

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And finally, to end my work for today, I curved the bottom.  At first, I was worried because the ends of the dory were much higher than 1/8" (as in this pic), but as it dried, the ends came down to where they needed to be!  I am very happy with what I did today... lots to learn, but its fun!

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Posted (edited)

For wood to wood any yellow glue will work, Titebond or Elmers I found work equally well for model work.  Woodworking is were the different types are used for various applications.  Elmers white glue will hold but is harder to get the initial tack or grab, clamping is more important.  Yellow glue has good initial grab and a lot of times you can get away without any clamping. 

 

I don't use much CA for wood to wood bonding but I do use them together sometimes.  A small amount of CA with yellow or white glue for the rest of the joint.  The small dot of CA acts as a clamp while the other glue sets up.  The bond strength does not come frm the CA.

 

Don

Edited by Don
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Posted (edited)

Looking good! I second the opinions for using yellow glue, works much better, Titebond is a brand that has worked well for me. As for excess cleanup, I have found that if you let the excess start to setup and get a bit rubbery it is easy to cut that excess away with a sharp knife.

Edited by turangi
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On 4/13/2021 at 11:30 PM, lraymo said:

In the forward view, it looks a bit crooked to me, but I’m hoping its just the camera angle!

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Your stem could be slightly crooked.  When a part is laser cut, the laser beam is wider at the top of the part and gets narrower as it cuts into the wood.  If the laser beam is out of focus, then the angle can get more severe.  I always use a miniature square to make sure that the part is 90 degrees to the base.  If it is not, I will have to true up the joint being glued.

 

You said "I still can’t really understand how to use “water & brush” to remove excess glue, but my toothpick seemed to work for me!"  I use a damp brush to pick up the excess glue.  Just drag the damp brush through the excess glue and then rinse the brush.  Keep repeating this process until all the excess glue has been removed.

 

Your progress looks good and your detailed build log will help future builders of this model.

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Your model is looking good. I also built this model. Interesting glue discussion. I've been using white PVA and sometimes a little CA, but I think I'll try yellow when I start planking my current model. Read the instructions carefully! Good methods are given there, but you must think ahead and understand what is intended. When you find yourself asking, "why is this piece shaped this way, what is this notch for," it's time to stop and think. When I have continued to assemble without understanding, that's when I've made mistakes which would have been easier to correct before adding the piece. I also tend to start to rush a bit at the point where the model really starts to look like a boat, that's a dangerous time for me. . . I'm learning to slow down (slowly!). Just some free advice from another beginner as I'm sure I'm not unique, take it for what it's worth.

 

Bob

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19 hours ago, turangi said:

Looking good! I second the opinions for using yellow glue, works much better, Titebond is a brand that has worked well for me. As for excess cleanup, I have found that if you let the excess start to setup and get a bit rubbery it is easy to cut that excess away with a sharp knife.

Thanks turangi, I'll try that method going forward!

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9 hours ago, Ryland Craze said:

 

Your progress looks good and your detailed build log will help future builders of this model.

Thanks Ryland.  The glue tips are helpful, as is the description of the laser beam!  I'll have to pay attention.

I was thinking I was putting too many pictures up... I'm only on step 3, but hopefully the details will help other newbies!

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8 hours ago, bobandlucy said:

I'm learning to slow down (slowly!).

I wish I could learn this trait!  I get so anxious to see the next step!  Your build log has really been helpful in showing me what's next and what its supposed to look like!  thanks!  (Oh, and I'm going to steal your idea of "staining the thwarts"... they look great!)   Of course, it will take me quite a while to get to that point in the build, but I'm already checking out stain colors!

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Starting steps 4, 5 and 6. I was nervous (again), but went ahead with the frames. I’m glad I used the drawings on page 5 of the instructions. Page 4 wasn’t sized exactly right. I’ve been using wax paper under everything to catch any excess glue (and to avoid gluing my model to my new cutting mat!) And then, I used a single blade from a box cutter to slide under the frame to disengage it from being glued to the wax paper!

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I didn’t worry too much about excess glue on the frame tops, because those will be cut off later. Meanwhile, I learned an important factoid. Apparently, if you spill some isopropyl alcohol on your nice kitchen table, it removes the finish completely! (Oops!) Hence the new cutting mat!

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Time for the building board. Tried to sand the char off the top. Wasn’t as successful as I wanted, but I didn’t want to break anything. Everything still seems incredibly fragile! I’m hoping the planking will give the model some “substance”!783035827_step5a_1000.jpg.563dd325f2f9fe6a2449aa085a787008.jpg

 

Step 6 – letting it dry. I added some weight to the top to make sure it’s all glued well. AND I switched to using yellow wood glue (which came in the kit). It seems to work better for me.

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The very scary “planking” is next, but letting this dry overnight before I have to face my fears!!!

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22 minutes ago, lraymo said:

Apparently, if you spill some isopropyl alcohol on your nice kitchen table, it removes the finish completely! (Oops!) Hence the new cutting mat!

 Do I see a kitchen table refinishing in your future? Good to see you making progress, nice job. 

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Steps 7, 8 and 9… getting there. Not getting to do as much on the model this week. It’s amazing how fast these “retirement days” fill up with other stuff to do!   Bending the garboard planks went fairly well.1263162871_bendingthefirstgarboardplanks_1000.jpg.81820e0ed095a8f1c3ba709b4bdde1b0.jpg

 

Gluing this first plank was a challenge.

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And as you can see, I made a mess of it!235348910_makingamessofgarboard_1000.jpg.0bbdb2799780e2b48b034884f09e91d1.jpg

 

But I was happy with how it turned out, after sanding everything down.  Although itn looks like it has separated from the bottom, its been tightly glued.  I'm hoping the final painting will cover up this gaff!

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At this point I was beginning to feel a bit more confident. Bending the Broad plank wasn’t too bad… I poured hot water from my Kuerig coffee maker onto a dinner plate, and let the wood soak for about 7 minutes.

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And gluing, although stressful, seemed to go a little better than the first planks.  I had found all these little clothespins at Target, which are really helping to secure things. I’m happy with how this one side turned out. Now I need to do the other side.

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The only problem so far... the transom is getting beat up in the process! I now plan on leaving it alone till I finish the planking, then I can hopefully sand/glue/fill any dings or problems at that time. Stay tuned!1096997654_transomgettingbeatup_1000.jpg.fd5eeabb9f3dd6949c7dc1a62998d76a.jpg

 

And thanks, everyone, again for all the words of wisdom and the "likes".  I've started looking at all your current projects and I am humbled, after seeing your incredibly complex models, that you would take time to comment on my little boat!  I'm really impressed with this community!

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