Jump to content

Bluenose, Mysterious Object on Aft Deck


Recommended Posts

I've been building the Schooner Bluenose (Model Shipways at 1:100 scale) and am now up to the point of constructing the deck furniture.

 

In an effort to try and add a little more authenticity to the build I searched the internet for photos and further documentation on the ship.  I found a series of old photos that are supposed to be of the original ship.

 

Looking over these photos I found an object on the aft deck next to the steering box.  There is no description, that I can find, of this object.  It's not listed in the model plans or instructions.

 

I've also posted this with my build log to see if anyone reading it may have a clue.

 

It looks like a round hassock.  Any ideas on what it is?

post-723-0-48722000-1373811749_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure on that idea.  There were barrels stowed forward of the main cabin and I would think that fresh water barrels would have been stowed below deck to keep them out of the salt spray.

 

This thing is even too far aft to have a use for fishing because the dories are stowed far forward of this position.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that very object has been a puzzle to many folks.

I think it was some kind of container that might have held something the pilot /  captain needed.

but that is just an idea.   seems like it was not lashed down to the deck but was it kept on deck while at sea or only when ready to dock ?

Heck it might even be a place to sit next to the wheel ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

It is on the plans I have from the Maritime museum of the Atlantic in Halifax Nova Scotia. The plans are by John R. Stevens 1961. I will ask at the next meeting of the Maritime Ship Modellers  Guild (see web sight) the plans do not identify it but some one at the Guild might know.You can also contact the South Shore Ship Modellers Guild they meet at the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic in Lunenburg Nova Scotia. They have one member that sailed on the Blouenose and he told me there were cod liver oil barrels also forward of the main cabin , he has a model that showed them 

Edited by patpdm
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting item, this.


Much too low and wide to contain anything liquid. Any kind of sea would have it slopping over the brim. And too awkward for one man to carry without soaking himself all over.


The photo might be deceiving, but the thick wooden lid seems comfortably rounded at the rim.


If it is a container, my money would be on something light and dry, say a long lead or shot line that needs to be stored without kinks.


 


Could also be a porta potty. Helmsmen, for the use of.  ;)


 


Per

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 I just wondered - I sailed a bristol pilot cutter for a long time which had a very similar size wheel fitted on like this on the front of the rudder housing.

 

Steering was b*** uncomfortable sitting on the steering box for long and the wheel is a bit low  for standing - could this be an helmsman's seat ?

Edited by SpyGlass
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put this photo up on a facebook historic ship page and nobody hit the ball out of the park with a good answer so far. One guy pointed out that the schooner in the background of the photo appears to have the exact same object on it's deck. One person felt it was a retrofitted hatch for an after compartment. I have trouble believing that though since the object looks like wood to me and a watertight hatch would have dogs and a handle of some sort, and if it isn't watertight why is it round? All the other schooner openings I have seen have been square. Others feel its an elaborate case for a log line or deep sea line. This makes marginally more sense but I am still skeptical. Its a great mystery and I can't wait to hear back from some other experts I presented the photo to. Thanks for putting up the photo Jack Tar!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a lengthy discussion of this item in my log on MSW1.  The general consensus was that it was a lazarette for storing who knows what, but no definitive answer was found.  The MS plans describe it as "unidentified object - this could be a scuttle or deep tub for stowage of main sheet hauling end".  Without any clear purpose found for it, I decided to leave it off for now.  If one of the experts comes through, I still have room to add it in.

 

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It really is odd - I have a set of 1940 model plans drawn by H. W. Potter (never heard of the gent before - have any of you?) for the Bluenose which doesn't show it.  The 1996 Model Shipways plans are as Bob indicated - an "unknown object" - added no doubt based on the above photo.

 

The object to port and aft of the cabin may be a scuttle; or, more likely, a storage tub for the main sheet hauling tackle. Cut it from sheet stock and round the
top edge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me this a container for storing coiled line, such as a logline or depth sounder. Something that needed to be in proper order to be used immediately. We sometime use buckets but is far better when we have a cutout oil barrel bottom. the coils are coming off without any kinks. The cover is just sailors invention to serve as a seat or to be stored without messing. up the line. If it was a hatchcoaming there will be some reinforcement on deck around it. and proper latches.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I live in Nova Scotia and built model bluenoses to sell. I have included this object in all my ships that I build, but I am not certain of its purpose. I will talk to the rest of the members in the South shore modellers guild and post the results. I have been in it since it's inception.

Edited by Paul J
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

A scuttle opening that large on one side of the deck, but not on the other, and so close to a hatch corner, just seems structurally wrong. Assuming that the helmsman is right handed, then what shallow round object, otherwise in need of protective covering, might he need to grab quickly from a handy locker with his left hand, but not take his right hand from the helm? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 I have just looked at Phillip Eisnor's drawings and it is not included on them. I am inclined to think it is not a permanent fixture like an access hatch but is more likely a movable container although somewhat cumbersome  and apparently not equipped with handles. I recall the discussion back on MSW1  but  if my memory is not flawed  no firm conclusion was reached.

Kip

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Hi,

maybe I've the proper answer.

looking to my plans coming from a numbered copy of the 1975 L.B. Jenson drawings book I found that the "object" (altough square and not round) placed exactly where the round one in the picture is, must be a scuttle.

Look to my attachment and check the perfect correspondence between the position of the square "object" and the location of the purposely made opening on the deck structure.

There is no reason but for a passage for such an arrangement of the deck construction in that place.

Captainroger

post-8508-0-90500200-1385142555_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roger -  I believe the Jenson book contains drawing of Bluenose II, which does not have the same deck layout as the original.  There is no evidence that a scuttle existed at that location on the original.  I think we are still in the dark on the "round object" on the original.

 

Other differences between the original and BN II that are apparent on the drawing you posted:  on the original there was a hatch behind the mainmast in the position the Jenson drawing shows a companionway.  Also, the cabin on the replica is longer than the original, running the length of 15 frames, where on the original it only ran 9 frames in length and left a larger deck space between the cabin and the mainmast.

 

Thanks for sharing this information, but I think the hunt for the answer still must continue.

 

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 I think  I've found it! Pages 66 and 67 of Jenson's book Contain drawings of the original 1921  Bluenose. On the port side next to the ships wheel is a round object On page 67 in the color scheme drawing  the same object is identified  as "Lazaret Hatch Cover (grey)"  Certainly  a small  and a rather uncomfortable access to a dank and damp area. It looks as if they improved on it sizewise on the II.

  Kip

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Bob,   I  cant claim  any credit any  for the earlier mention of a Lazaret. Was it "working Sailor"? When I purchased my copy of Jenson's book I found by far the cheapest source was "Chapters Indigo on line" it was about $16 if I remember correctly. Full of nice drawings and interesting facts.

Kip

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

I see you have the right answer it was access to the lazaret and was user to store spare ropes and also access to the ruder i spoke with an old gentielman from the south Shore modelers Guild of Lunenburg NS who sailed on the Bluenose and he said as young kids on the boat they would hide in there among the ropes to get warm.

Pat

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...