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I recently bought a used 100 watt American Beauty  power supply and foot switch.  I intend to use this for resistance soldering. It is my intent to make my own hand pieces. The two connections, hot lead and ground, are 1/4in female.  See photo below.  

 

Does anybody know if commercial male connectors are available available to fit this unit?  If so, what are they called?  

 

It it would appear that I could turn something that would work but I would rather buy something if I can.

 

RogerD6D4EF97-64F7-4051-BE51-67C336D8D12C.thumb.jpeg.451e29f59e411fd5255f7b7f2c72c17d.jpeg

 

 

 

 

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A place to check for al sorts of electronic parts, wires and connectors:

Marlin P. Jones & Assoc.   www.mpia.com

The selectable output bench supply DC 3-12V 200mA  works well with small DC motors used to power small drill bits inside tight spaces  -as an example of something with application here.

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Ron,

 

What you have should work well.  180 watts!

 

As far as my unit goes, the connections are not coaxial.  One is the hot lead that sends electricity to the hand piece.  There are two styles of hand pieces, probe, and tweezer.  For the probe, which I intend to try first, the piece to be soldered is grounded back to the unit separately with an alligator type clip.

 

Roger

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Looks like the current 100 Watt model. The user manual and other information can be found here:

 

https://americanbeautytools.com/Resistance-Probe-Systems/110/features

 

I have a little experience with resistance soldering with an American Beauty 250 Watt unit. Part of the probe is a carbon electrode which is VERY brittle and breaks easily (really annoying). The carbon electrode does not react with the metal being soldered. A metal probe might arc and scar the piece being worked on, or might even weld itself to the piece, depending on the materials and current.

 

You can use an alligator clip to connect the return circuit to one of the pieces being soldered (preferably the larger piece. However, this will create several tiny point contacts with the work piece, and you might get some arcing and pitting. Many people recommend using a large sheet of conductive metal (copper,steel, etc.) as a base and clamping the larger work piece to it to get a good electrical connection. Then the probe is positioned against the other work piece before power is turned on.

 

The carbon probe has a relatively high resistance and therefore heats up as current flows through it. Some of this heat transfers to the work piece, but it is heat generated in the solder that causes it to melt.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks to all who commented.  

 

I found some internet blogs last night that I hadn’t seen before.  One particularly helpful one discussed connections and cautioned that ordinary commercial electronic connectors will not work well in handling the heavy ampere loads required.  You are basically designing a short circuit and the point of resistance needs to occur at the joint to be soldered, not at the connectors.

 

I wound up buying two ground leads made by American Beauty.  One I will use for the ground.  The other I will use to make a handpiece.  These leads have the properly tapered connectors.

 

Roger 

Edited by Roger Pellett
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

Thanks to all who commented

Gosh, was my guess wrong! Just looking, it resembles a 1/4 inch plug but like life, looks are deceiving :) I'm glad you got it solved Roger. I looked around a bit and found a DIY site that had a guy re-wiring his own secondary windings on a transformer to supply his device. 8 wraps of #6 AWG! The connectors were huge! Again I apologize for sending you down the wrong path

Ron

Edited by Ron Burns
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Hi Roger, not sure if you are aware of this info sheet from American Beauty.  On seeking their advice I was forwarded this information which may help.  The particular point I am tryng t emphasise is the heat point is around the point of resistance, which they reinforce using special probes.  May be worth considering when making yours?

 

I have no financial or other affiliation with the company; simply they have been very helpful and accommodating in creating a product I needed, and in how to use it properly.

 

" The first thing is to better understand "Resistance Soldering: How it Works and What are the Benefits" as provided in this linked document.

The type of thermal energy provided is based on both resistance and conduction of the converted (high amperage, low voltage) current from the power unit.

The current provided is A/C so there is no + or - when attaching the handpiece or accessories to the output terminals. The resistance to current flow causes the heat and is why we incorporate the materials used in our electrodes and elements. The conduction path is intended to have as little resistance as possible and is the reason for the materials used for the handpiece and accessory components. The copper plating on the electrodes is to improve current conduction to the tip so that the heat developed is localized to the point of contact as much as possible.

 

 If you are experiencing excessive heat where the clip of the current return harness is in contact with the component or work piece the cause is resistance or poor conduction. This issue may be caused by oxidation,dirt or other contamination affecting the required current flow. Another cause might be the location of the clip or the materials it is clipped onto. As long as the materials are conductive (copper, brass etc.) the clip does not need to be as close to the intended solder joint, but if the materials are less conductive (stainless steel) the clip should be in closer proximity to the joint."

 

Hope this helps.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thanks Pat,

 

This answers two important questions.  First, the American Beauty power source is AC.  Second, in buying the carbon electrodes, copper plated ones are preferred.  The information from those who have made their own systems says that they use carbon rods sold for air arc gouging.

 

Roger

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On 4/27/2021 at 10:11 AM, Roger Pellett said:

Ron,

 

Thanks for your post.  No apology is necessary.  Intelligent discussion is the way that we learn, especially from those whose expertise is different from ours.

 

Roger

 

On 4/26/2021 at 10:14 AM, Roger Pellett said:

I recently bought a used 100 watt American Beauty  power supply and foot switch.  I intend to use this for resistance soldering. It is my intent to make my own hand pieces. The two connections, hot lead and ground, are 1/4in female.  See photo below.  

 

Does anybody know if commercial male connectors are available available to fit this unit?  If so, what are they called?  

 

It it would appear that I could turn something that would work but I would rather buy something if I can.

 

RogerD6D4EF97-64F7-4051-BE51-67C336D8D12C.thumb.jpeg.451e29f59e411fd5255f7b7f2c72c17d.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Hi,  I have the same unit only I bought it new. The 100Watt is $500.00.  Micro Mark Tools carry this unit. I have the tweezers and the soldering iron like probe. all of the attachments have an electrical male fitting which plugs straight into the female opening. go to Micro Mark.com and they have all of the stuff.  also a small part grounded tool similar to an engraving ball chuck.

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Just now, AllanDobson@Boeing said:

 

Hi,  I have the same unit only I bought it new. The 100Watt is $500.00.  Micro Mark Tools carry this unit. I have the tweezers and the soldering iron like probe. all of the attachments have an electrical male fitting which plugs straight into the female opening. go to Micro Mark.com and they have all of the stuff.  also a small part grounded holding tool similar to an engraving ball chuck.  Allan

allanjudy1@msn.com

 

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