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Sherbourne by Stockholm tar -

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yes...I will be......you build is in my watch list.  I had a very extensive list back on the old MSW.   I was a newbie back then {still am in some ways}....I wanted to see and learn as much as I could.

 

I was kidding about being a secret......it's so nice to see some of your work.   hope to see more.  :)

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Hello Kester,

What beautiful work you’ve done on the cutter. Recently I’ve become interested in cutters and your project is the icing on the cake. I’m new to model ship building but have started to think about doing a full build after I finish the cross section I’m working on.

 

As others have said before me “thank you for posting your grand work”.

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Hello Paddy,

 

Many thanks for your vote of confidence. I'm not sure about her being the 'icing on the cake' – perhaps more the substantial base! :D

 

It's interesting how much interest cutters have generated, and it looks like you're going to be another convert. I don't know if you intend building Sherbourne, another kit, or indeed scratch, but I think you will have a lot of fun – and I daresay a few headaches.

 

You say you are new to ship modelling but, after having seen your Triton cross section, I think you'd make a splendid job with a cutter. I wish you luck when you get to that point, and I for one will be following with interest.

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Kester,

 

The full build I’m getting keyed up for is the English revenue cutter Cheerful of 1806. It’s a plank on bulkhead project being designed by Chuck Passaro for the first time scratch builder. Mr. Passaro is sometime away from releasing it but maybe it will be ready to go in the near future.

 

If I were going to do a kit I think your HM Cutter Sherbourne would be very tempting. :D

 

P.S. Thanks for taking a look at my current project. Its been a great learning process and very enjoyable. Good folks here to help this rookie along. :dancetl6:

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Paddy,

 

The Cheerful looks as though it will be an interesting project, and I think we know that anything produced by Chuck has guaranteed authenticity built in! So good for you, I hope it goes well – when it comes out that is.

 

 

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Having fitted the boom, the next job was to make the gaff. This was made in a similar fashion, its dimensions being taken from the AOTS Alert book. The gaff tapers rather more along its length than the boom, with its maximum width being closer to the mast. Again, I made similar modifications to the kit-supplied jaws (they are actually the same fitting as for the boom) in that they were first split in two, each half being shaped to fit the gaff end, and then glued to the spar on either side.

 

The other fittings are as follows (from the jaws end): an eyebolt on top of the spar, just above the jaws, to take the lower double-block of the throat halliard; a stop, on top of the spar, just aft of this to retain the mainsail throat lashing; a strop for the small double blocks (one each side) for the mainsail brails; another strop, fitted about midway along the gaff, to which were attached two small single lead blocks, again for the brails; two stops on top of the spar, for the rigging span to which is attached one of the single blocks of the peak halliard tackle; further aft, a strop for a second single block for the peak halliard tackle; at the after end, a stop to retain the mainsail peak lashing; finally, an eyebolt in the end of the gaff to which is fitted a small single block for the ensign halliards. I decided to paint the entire gaff black, including the jaws, and gave the spar a light covering of beeswax.

 

post-427-0-53616800-1380124606_thumb.jpg

 

I thought there might have been similar problems of movement with the after end of the gaff, as there had been with the boom. However, having dry-fitted the spar, in its hoisted position on the pin inserted in the mast, I found it was quite firm and that further measures were not necessary. I also surmised that the process of gluing would significantly reduce any movement. Due to this concern, I had initially intended to fit vangs at the end of the gaff, made fast to belaying pins on each quarter – but then discovered that these items of rigging weren’t fitted at that date. There is, therefore, a spare belaying pin aft on each side. I had a slight worry that the pin in the aft side of the mast might not be dead centre – or the end of the gaff would be off to one side or the other – and it was just slightly out. On the real ship it wouldn’t necessarily have been all-square in any case.

 

Having decided that it would be best to lace the gaff to the head of the mainsail before fitting the spar, I now set about making the sail itself. This was cut from an old, thin, handkerchief, its size being about half that of the actual sail area in order to reduce its bulk when furled. Naturally I made it with a full-length head, to be laced along the length of the gaff, narrowing towards the foot. To represent the seams, I teased out equidistant strands from the cloth, about a centimeter apart, which seemed about right. The operation had to be done very carefully, as the strands could break quite easily, using a pair of tweezers. Around the sail’s edge I made a narrow hem, using a fabric glue, to which I added a scale boltrope (on the traditional larboard, or port, side). I then added reef bands and reef points, with strengthening pieces at the peak, throat, tack and clew (I now realise that those at the peak and throat are a little over large, something I will have to watch with the other sails.)

 

Then it was time to put the kettle on. When it was reasonably hot, but not boiling, I poured the water onto a teabag ­– for staining the sail, of course (!) – in one of my wife’s small baking trays. When the resultant ’brew’ was about the right colour I put in the sail, spreading it out so that it was completely submerged, and left it for a couple of hours. As the sail changed colour quite quickly, I had look at it every now and then to see how it was progressing. Removing it from the tray when a suitable shade, I spread it out to dry overnight. When dry I found that, besides being a good colour, the cloth had puckered somewhat – which made it look even more realistic.

 

Now I had to attach it to the gaff, for which I used a needle and .25 black rigging cord. Fastening the cord around the spar at the jaws end I proceeded along the length of the gaff, piercing the sail just under the bolt rope (approximately every centimetre) with the needle, and forming a marline hitch along the spar as it progressed. A brief smear of glue under the line fixed each hitch around the spar when tightened, and a little touch-up with diluted black paint covered any excess that was visible.

 

The next operation was to attach the gaff to the mast. As mentioned the spar was quite firm when dry-fitted, but the CA glue applied to the pin prevented any real further movement. I then fitted the parrel, in similar fashion as for the boom. With that done, the next task was to stretch out the luff, or leading edge, of the sail and lash the tack down to the eyebolt in the boom, using the loop I had formed in the boltrope. This stretched out the sail, and I could then concentrate on fitting the sail hoops. As I mentioned earlier, I had unfortunately already glued the crosstrees in place, which meant that I would have to fit the hoops around the mast. This suggested that they would have to be of a bendable material, and copper strip presented itself as a workable solution – some of which I just happened to have. Making the hoops was straightforward although, being a soft metal, it was quite easy to bend the strips out of shape if too much pressure was applied. There are eight hoops in all and I eventually worked out, with a bit of trail and error, how long they would have to be, including the overlap for glueing the ends. I seem to remember a high-tech piece of string came into the the process! They also have to be a loose fit, to give the illusion that they could run freely on the mast. Following a little experimentation, I finally painted them a near buff colour, which I thought suitable to represent wood. Being metal this took a little while, as there are about three coats, which also included those inside each hoop so that no copper was visible.

 

I fitted the hoops by cutting small equidistant slots in the luff of the sail the width of the hoop, carefully bent each just enough for it to pass around the mast, pushed one end through the slot in the sail, and then closed it against the other end, fixing it with touch of CA glue.

 

post-427-0-13335800-1380125051_thumb.jpg

 

Furling the sail into the mast, which I had decided would best be done on the model, had to be attempted rather carefully. First of all I attached the two brails on each side, which I would actually use to furl up the sail, threading them through the blocks already fitted. Dampening the sail, with a light wetting from a spray bottle helped with the process. Then it was just a case of gently pulling on each of the four brails, two being attached to the clew and two at about the middle of the leech, and lifting the sail from underneath until it was as close in to the mast as was possible. During the process I was careful that the sail furled with a natural look, and that the folds hung evenly. When it was dry, I was quite pleased with the result. The brails falls were made fast to the pins in the boom jaws, each one being finished off with a small coil. It then only remained to belay the clew outhaul to a cleat on the boom, glue down some of the reef points (which stuck out at odd angles) to the sail, and the job was done.

 

Next time: More items of running rigging, the shrouds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow Kester the furled sails look amazing (I'm not a huge fan of sails on models as they tend to look 'static' or limp, but yours look as I said amazing) in fact the more I look the more I think I shall do the same!.. what a wonderful build log! so sad that you don't have the very early stuff.. oh well !

 

BTW I like the 'name' on the cradle/stand. very nice touch.

 

Eamonn

 

Future Sherbourne builder :)

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Kester,

 

She is looking outstanding. What excellent sail work! Every time I look at your work I get more tempted. Not that I could do her justice but for what you've shown is possible with this grand little kit. Well done sir.

 

I'm starting to think I should start checking to see if she is available this side of the pond.

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Thanks guys,

 

I appreciate your continued interest.

 

Eamonn,

 

Sails on models are a probably a personal thing, and I (like you I imagine) don't particularly like the sails set when a ship is on a stand. However, I think furled sails are acceptable, as not only do they allow more detail to be seen, but they give the impression that she might be going somewhere – if only she wasn't fixed to this bit of wood! Many here won't agree with this view, but each to his own. I'm flattered that you might emulate my example.

 

My apologies for the 'missing' pages to my log, but I'm afraid I can't remember that far back!

 

BE,

 

Thanks, as always.

 

Paddy,

 

Thanks for your kind words. She is indeed a 'grand little kit' as you say, and is certainly open for improvement. I don't believe you however, when you say you couldn't do her justice, as I am certain you would make a fine job of her. I don't know if the Sherbourne, or any of the other Jotika kits, are available in the US through an agent, but I hope your searches bear fruit.

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Like your build and all the detail. Do have one question,  you  probably have a good answer. Question is, you left the anchor cables around the windless drums, having knocked the pelican hook loose on anchor chains and watched the chain run around anchor windless with controlling brakes and then down the hawse pipe, I can't help but wonder what would happen to that type of windless if the dogs were released and the anchor let go with the anchor line positioned on the windless for lifting. No offense intended, just  the type who wonders about cause and effect, kept me out of trouble many times.

jud

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Sumner, TK11,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

Jud,

 

Thank you too.

 

As to your question, I'm not exactly sure – apart from the strain put on the windlass from the anchor! The windlass, which was normally fitted on small vessels, was itself used as the riding bitts – unlike on larger ships, which had separate fittings. From what little I have read on the subject of windlasses, (it's mostly about capstans) there were various methods to prevent the cable from running out accidentally, including using various stoppers, and the fitting of capstan bars on the fore side of the windlass close to, or touching, the deck as a precaution against its running back. The anchor was of course normally securely lashed. Probably the best precaution however, was a well trained crew – and any seamen would know of the dangers associated with anchors.

 

Before 'letting go' in the normal fashion, I would think that the cable was detached from the anchor, the turns were taken off the windlass and the cable flaked on deck, before the cable was re-attached and let run under the windlass. Of course the cable might just have been allowed to run off the windlass.

 

I have sailed on a few sailing ships, but have never come across a windlass. They seem though, to have been used on small craft into the twentieth century.

 

Perhaps John might like to comment?

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nice bit of literature Kester.......I like you did it.......lots of meat with the potatoes!  :)   you have a beautiful ship there.......the sail came out really nice.   the rigging is very well done.....superb workmanship,  my friend! :)

 

I think the windlass was used more on smaller ships........the capstan came into use a bit later than the windlass,  and was found to be more suited for larger ships.   as Dafi showed in one of his dioramas,  they could measure how deep the water was where they were to weigh anchor.........it was probably ratcheted down into the water by the use of pawls or chocks.  once the anchor was in the water,  and it could compensate weight {slow it down},  it was probably allowed to free-fall to the bottom.   this is probably where the terminology came from as well.  I know there are a lot of  'probably's' in here.........I've given thought about this as well.....I'm not an expert either.

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It's always a pleasure reading your retrospective log Kester. I really like how you did the furled sail--it came out beautifully, and using copper for the hoops was a wonderful idea! Your craftsmanship and and research are superb!

 

I hope you don't mind my mentioning this in your log, but wanted to let Paddy know (since he's also a follower of you build, too) that he can purchase Caldercraft kits from Ages of Sail in the US. Also, having them shipped from Cornwall Boats in the UK to the Staes often is about the same total cost as Ages of Sail. I purchased my Sherbourne from Cornwall, as I also ordered a few extras that Ages didn't stock. ;)

 

Looking forward to your next installment! :)

 

Jay

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Jay,

 

Thanks for your continuing interest and kind comments. I'm flattered (flattened?) by your words, however, I fear that's a little over the top!

Having said that, I think such comments make us all better modelmakers, and make us strive to do the best job we can.

 

No, I certainly don't mind you offering advice to Paddy re. Jotika/Caldercraft suppliers in the US. I hope he finds what he's looking for.

 

Btw, is your avatar a still from Captain's Courageous? I love that film.

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Kester, I really liked Captain Courageous as well, but my avatar is a photo by Wallace MacAskill. Some of his most famous photos are of the Bluenose; his photos of the Bluenose were the inspirations for Canada's famous .50 Bluenose stamp as well as .10 cent coin. Here's a link to his work if you'd like to see more of his photos: http://gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/macaskill/

 

Jay

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I hope you don't mind my mentioning this in your log, but wanted to let Paddy know (since he's also a follower of you build, too) that he can purchase Caldercraft kits from Ages of Sail in the US. Also, having them shipped from Cornwall Boats in the UK to the Staes often is about the same total cost as Ages of Sail. I purchased my Sherbourne from Cornwall, as I also ordered a few extras that Ages didn't stock. ;)

 

Jay

Thanks for that Jay and thanks to you Kester for letting us borrow your thread.

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No thanks necessary gentlemen, only too glad to help if it results in Paddy finding his model.

 

Paddy,

 

It would seem as though you're veering towards the Sherbourne then, rather than the Cheerful?

 

Jay,

 

Ok, not from C.C, but it looks as though it might have been. Thanks for the link, I shall look at that with interest. Those cod schooners were fine ships, and probably prompted me towards my first model, although I opted for building Billing's Bluenose ll. At 100th scale, she is a bit small though. I finished her some years ago now, but was actually thinking of putting photos of her in the gallery. I replaced all the plastic parts with wooden replacements, gave her propellors, and used Jensen's book for the rigging – so I was kit bashing even then!

 

 

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No thanks necessary gentlemen, only too glad to help if it results in Paddy finding his model.

 

Paddy,

 

It would seem as though you're veering towards the Sherbourne then, rather than the Cheerful?

 

 

I’ll still be interested in doing Chuck’s Cheerful project when it is released even if I go forward with the Sherbourne. :)

 

If you don’t mind are you using the cannon that came with the Sherbourne kit? The reason I ask is Chuck Passaro has three sizes of brass cannon available in 3/16 scale and I’m wondering if they would come close for the cannon used with Sherbourne kit?

 

http://www.syrenshipmodelcompany.com/turned-brass-cannon.php

 

My interest must be building as you can see since particulars are starting to come to mind. Also, just made an online buy of Peter Goodwin’s Naval Cutter Alert 1777 book.

 

 

 

I’m beginning to feel like the one eyed dog in the butcher shop. :D 

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Kester,

 

Not sure about the practice at the time of your cutter, but in the late 19th century, when these types of windlasses were still very much in use on smaller craft, the practice was to heave as much cable around the windlass as was required for anchoring and flake it down on deck ready for letting go.  I would suppose that the same system was used earlier.  With the cable around the windlass drum and the anchor securely lashed, nothing's going to go anywhere but, having said that, accidents still happen and there have been cases of modern ships suddenly finding themselves with an anchor and cable hanging off the bow and held only by the clench in the chain locker.

 

John

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Paddy,

 

Yes, I used the cannon that came with the kit, although I wasn't particularly happy with them. Some had an amount of flash to clean up, and a couple were a little misshapen at the muzzle end. These two I turned so that the damage was not so visible! Neither the barrels nor the carriages were that accurate (for example, the barrels don't have all the reinforcing rings) and thinking about it now, I probably would have changed them.

 

One point about the guns though, was that I had problems in getting two of them to fit through the ports (my own fault for not getting one of the gunport strips really straight!) and it took a quite bit of sanding, etc., to get them to do so (and even now they almost touch the top edge) so you would have to find some approximately the same size.

 

As to whether Chuck's guns will fit the Sherbourne I'm not sure. Perhaps you should download his pdf and check, or send him a pm. I note though, they would appear to fit his Cheerful.

 

I suppose you could build the Sherbourne in the interim, whilst waiting for the Cheerful. As I say, she is a nice model to build, and you can have fun improving her, but I would think that Chuck's cutter would be the more interesting and accurate. I would like to see you start that when available.

 

I found Peter Goodwin's 'Naval Cutter Alert' to be very useful, particularly for the earlier cutters like Sherbourne  (Alert was fourteen years later). One thing I did find slightly annoying though, was that the belaying points for much of the running rigging is omitted, which often left me wondering where I should belay various lines. I have Petersson's 'Rigging Fore and Aft Craft', which is of some help as it contains the rigging of a cutter. However, this vessel is some twenty years later than Sherbourne, so discretion is advised.

 

I hope this helps. 

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