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Mirabell61

How to sew sails on your wifes sewing machine

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Resubmitting of lost pictures

 

Hi fellow builders,

 

as some of the pics went lost some time ago I have resubmitted these, beginning with # 32 post on page 3

 

Nils

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi fellow builders,

in Need for sewed sails, I dared to do self Trials with my wifes sewing machine some months ago. If there is interest in anyone trying likewise, pls. dont hesitate to comunicate your queries here. Also feel free to share your own experience....

I use thin fine weaved Cotton Cloth, use 100% Polyester sewing thread, medium machine needle, textile glue for Fixing, some ordinary paper for Patterns and a soft pencil for drawing the contours from the templates onto the Cloth.

The Cloth is only slightly wettend with laundry starch spray and ironed dry . The soft pencil lines are easy to follow during Transit into the sewing machine. There is no Need for prefixing sewing needles along the seams. The ultimate kick I found was to place a 0,5mm stainles steel wire in spring Quality into the lower (bottom) Portion of the bolt-rope that encloses the sail. Braced to the wind, once mounted you get sails shaped as if the tradewind is just providing Swift sailing

Please follow the (I trust) self explaining Pictures, I added some coments, and a Little Hand scetch for Illustration. It does not Claim to be perfect, but the anxiety for the sewing machine is overcome, improvements are welcome, but last not least the "sewing boat" has been pushed out....


Part 1


sew straight seams horizontal, vertical


follow the soft pencillines on the Cotton cloth


trimm off the edge fringes after doing so, then follow my handscetch at the end of this part 1


spring wire (stainless st)and hollow weaved thicker Polyester tread


sorry, dont know the english Nomination for this seam making device


debur (important !! slightly round)wire edge and push gently though the weaved thread
Surplus wire endings shall be made to small Loops for the the sail bottom bolt-rope rings


stay sail pattern


after many Trials,.... seem to work now...


Comes out of the machine quite clean and neat now


should be self explaining... come on pls.get out your german/ engl. dictionary.
Of course I shall be happy if I can help....


Part 2 to follow

post-3445-0-66713800-1408728846_thumb.jpg

Edited by Mirabell61

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Part 2

 

 

post-3445-0-28210900-1374687012_thumb.jpg

have to push through... "Pamir" takes 32 sails and "Gorch Fock" 23 sails

 

post-3445-0-12445800-1374687021_thumb.jpg

textile glue with fine applicartion nozzle, works surprisingly well (found on Ebay)

 

post-3445-0-20544000-1374687026_thumb.jpg

this is a spool of 0,5mm Polyester weaved hollow thread. Predestinated for pushing a wire Soul through, works well !

 

post-3445-0-60448200-1374687006_thumb.jpg

 full suit sails mounted, my Tallship "Pamir" model

 

post-3445-0-12763800-1374687016_thumb.jpg

likewise, sails attached to "Gorch Fock"

 

Nils

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Thank you for sharing your experience and techniques on this, Nils.  Your sails (like the rest of your work) are an excellent addition to your models.  I have been mulling over possible ways of doing sails for Bluenose for a while now and hope to get moving on it soon.  All input in this area is appreciated!

 

Bob

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A second WOW! Amazing work!

 

Right - now I must just figure out how to use the Admiral-of the-Fleet's sewing machine.....

 

and surviving to post the results.

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is that the Billing's kit?   the sails {and the ships} look superb.......very well done.  I never tried to use a different color thread.  I have been using the admiral's sewing machine for a while now........funny,  I bought it for her,  and I've been the one using it the most.  I don't use wire, rather they are painted with diluted white glue,  and laid on a bed of towels {covered over with plastic wrap}.  the towels are puffed up in areas to give the sails a billowed look.  your efforts paid off very well......such a wonderful job !

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Hi Bob,

I´m glad you liked log, just had the Feeling it had to be shared with others, because before starting These " selfmade Trials" I searched the web in vain for decent sail making description.

By the way, I trust it is`nt the Billing boats Bluenose .... or ?

I have the 1:75 Billing boats BN on the shelf 3/4 completed for several years allready. Every time after I looked at that U-tube video I suggested to Eddie, who is currently building the Elsie, I know I have to carry on with the BN asap. Let us share some of your pics with your sailmaking progress

 

Happy sailmaking Trials

 

Nils

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Nil - I am doing the 1:64 Model Shipways kit - looking forward to you restarting your Billings build.  So far all trials are going on in my head - when I get to the point where I am actually doing something, I will document in the log.  BTW, I am enjoying your Pegasus build immensely.

 

Bob

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is that the Billing's kit?   the sails {and the ships} look superb.......very well done.  I never tried to use a different color thread.  I have been using the admiral's sewing machine for a while now........funny,  I bought it for her,  and I've been the one using it the most.  I don't use wire, rather they are painted with diluted white glue,  and laid on a bed of towels {covered over with plastic wrap}.  the towels are puffed up in areas to give the sails a billowed look.  your efforts paid off very well......such a wonderful job !

Hi Popeye,

no, the ships on the pictures of the first post in this sewing related thread are scratch built from plans and gathered Information, plenty of Research before kicking out the first work on the Frames.

An interesting technique you are explaining, would love to see some pics....

 

Regards

 

Nils

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you have done a splendid job on the both of them........one of these days,  I hope to get plans like that,  to produce something on such a grand scale........as you have.    the highest achievement that anyone aspires to..superb!  ;)

 

I have done a couple ships with sails......one with the most sails was the Billing's AmericA.   I have the build log here,  and the ship can be seen in the gallery.   I am currently doing the sails for the Billing's Bluenose,  for a friend.   I am also in the process of doing a tutorial of this process........so far,  I've only written one part.......at best,  it shows how to utilize a sail material sheet,  and how to get out of a tough spot,  when you realize the manufacturer made poor judgement by putting tape on the material itself.   I guess they don't know squat about adheasive transfer.  for what it's worth......here is what I have so far:

 

http://wenzelswharftips.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/sail-making-part-1/

 

perhaps you may be able to access other parts of the Wharf........if you can,  have a browse.......enjoy ;)

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Hi Popeye

thanks for sharing, the wenzelwharft description does not look bad, was this Content of the kit ?

What I would in every case sugest, is to do the straight Cloth connection seams first carrying on with the seam 1,5 to 2cm beyond the contour lines and then cut out the outside contour with the sewing thread fringes depending on if you do it my way (2 x 4mm Surplus)or more.

 

Regarding to the America I have just sold an 1200mm Long scratch built model hull of this great ship early this year because I had no more space in my Office. In the Moment I have 4 completed models in glass cases here, 2 Steamers next to the 2 Tallships and to date I woul´d`nt even know where to place the Pegasus once she is completed

 

post-3445-0-42544900-1374759488_thumb.jpg

scratch built mahagony lightweight hull, planked on Frame, epoxy with double glass roving coated, removeable 3000gram deadweight, ruder prepared for RC contol

 

Nils

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beautiful hull Nils........hope you got a good price.......nicely done!

 

the AmericA from Billings is a reissue......only 1:72 scale.......done out of the box,  but I did a little tweaking to her {some of the aspects didn't look functional}.   still made for a nice build though.

 

I can agree with that.......too much around the seam looks bad........I really have to get off my duff and get them done.  I have some other stuff I want to send him,  along with the sails.

 

so, you have another build in the works here..........I'll have to take a peek.   there are so many talented folks here.......since the crash of the old site,  I have been working slowly,  trying to get back all the builds I was watching at the time.   so many builders...{I guess I need to add you in as well} are so accomplished,  that it makes me feel like a novice again.........makes for good inspiration to do better.   I just enjoy the hobby.......parhaps one day,  I'll do one that compares....but I am in no hurry,  I'm having fun :)

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Very usefull when I one day (or year) reach that phase, and I shall follow this topic. Still planking and saaaaaanding...

 

In mean time, my thoughts are about thickness of canvas ( proper word ?) for Cutty 1:100 . Some kind of silk ? And how to sew it ? Far away for now, but my mind work what he wants, and think a lot in advance

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Hi Nenad

trust that is the right atitude of saving down impressions as they come in. Would like to see more of your Project, Keep the building log under good steam....

 

Nils

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when I did the Regina/Susan A build,  I found that the kit did not allow enough material for all of the sails  {neither did my Gothenborg build, but i've chosen to do it without sails.  I went to the local Hobby lobby........went through a lot of different materials,  until I found the right stuff.  it was sheer,  but not too sheer,  with the look of canvas.   after they were made and treated with the diluted white glue,  they kept shape very well.  there is suitable material out there......fabric stores are a great place to start.   some department stores even carry fabric, but since the 90's,  some of them have phased it out.

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Hi Popeye

I found good suitable Cotton Cloth at IKEA warehouse, is that also known in the place you live ?

 

Nils

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yepper.....we have that brand {company} here in the states.   there is some nice stuff out there......just need to l :) :) k.   I can't complain about Hobby Lobby though.....the lady I dealt with was very helpful......told her what I ws looking for,  and off we went :)  I wishI had a picture of what I settled on.......I will look in the Susan A pictures to see if I have a good one there   <pause>

 

post-612-0-97272300-1374844598_thumb.jpg

 

post-612-0-10254900-1374844614_thumb.jpg

 

these are the best pictures I have.  when I made these sails,  I wasn't as focused on the edge seams as I am now.   as with most processes,  the more you do it,  the better you get...... ;)   I stained the two sails with tea.

 

 

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nice Methode popeye,

I like the tea staining colour, and does your "pillow blow shaping" durable last even when sails are mounted and Operation ropes mounted?

 

Nils

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it does keep the shape,  as long as there is not too much tension on the rigging.   I used to do plastic kits in my younger days.  done too tight and it causes distortion.......so I thought up a cool way to do it.  thread can be pulled just tight enough where it looks taught,  but there is hardly any residual tension.   this is what I refer to as  'absolute zero'.   there is the stretch value of the thread to take into consideration, but it can be achieved.   I try to buy thread that is  'pre'stretched'.......beading thread in craft stores is an example of this.  if I have to stain thread  {black......I like to use India Ink},  I stretch it when this is done.   I like the thread you get from large plastic kits,  like Revell and heller,   but they don't sell it separately......too bad :(

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I had read where folks had used wire,  and depending on humidity and other factors,  they begin to rust and transpose the color around the edges of the sails.   it is good though........you can achieve perminant shaping with it.....but for this reason,  I havent done it.

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Hallo Mirabell61, I am building a model of the Cutty Sark, and am running into the same problems you have explained here.  I managed to obtain the hollow thread you used for your sails, and it seems to work well.  I see you used stainless steel with the thread to shape the sails.  I still have a few questions about the sewing of the sails.  I am not going to try the sewing, but I have a neighbour that is able to do that for me.  My email address is ike@telus.net, and I live on Vancouver island on the West Coast of Canada, and would like to make contact with you, so that I can relay instructions to my neighbour.  I spent 14 years in Germany while I was in the Canadian military, and did learn some German.  Ich hoffe bald von Ihnen zu hoehren.

 

Bis dann, Viele Gruesse, Heinz

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Hello Heinz

 

I liked to hear that my method of sailmaking was of help for your intended Cutty Sark sailmaking. Trust the stainless steel wire reinforced bolt rope Feature is understood an no Problem.

It is correct, that it is a bit difficult to Transfer the requirements for the sew-work to a good sewer Person who is not generally involved in the model rigging. This is really the reason why I started to do Trials on the sewing machine by myself.

The method proved allright for both complete sail sets on Gorch Fock II and Pamir

 

At the end of page 1 (of this post) there is a leaf in JPG formate with scetches of the sewing sequences. Please let me know of what sequence your sewer shall require Special advice for.

Feel free to ask I shall be happy to help.

Further Details can be exchanged via email addresses (mine is : nils.langemann@t-online.de) or by Personal Mail (PM) on this forum

Regards,

 

Nils

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I did not even think about the part of sewing sails.  I am pretty handy with a sewing machine and hand sewing.  I wonder if anyone has an extra sail or a botched sail that they could send me, so I have something to go by.  That may be one of the things I am good at.

 

I will be starting my 4th plastic ship as soon as I get it in the mail.  I am going to do the Heller Pinta model ship.  I have been doing great when it comes to putting the ship together.  It is the rigging that is killing me.  Boy, it is hard to get them tight.  I did my first shrouds on my last ship and they turned out to be a disaster, but I will admit the string that came with it was a bear to work with.  I still do not know how to tie things right.

 

Kimberley

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Hi Kimberley

as far as the plastic kits sails are concerned I have no experience at all. It can help to reinforce the plastic masts with wire inlay in case they come in semi halves from the mold.

For larger scale Wood built ships I use thin galvanized multisoul wire cord you may know from in circle flying wire controlled model aircraft. This is very flexible, has a high yeald strength and is easy to solder. When using this on shrouds, stays, backstays etc... in combination with spanner Fittings you can Play bassguitar on the strings. It is necessary though to povide durable and well placed Counter bases beneath the main decks. Unfortunately I have no Surplus sail in the Moment to send to you, but I`m sure that other fellow MSW builders may be able to help out here.

 

Nils

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I think I actually know what you are talking with the cord used on a flying model aircraft.  Where do you get it?  I hope by the time I start building wooden ships, I will understand everything you are talking about.  I am going to try and find a diagram of a ship that lists what each thing is on a ship.  I did order a book about plastic ships the other day that Andy suggested.  

 

I will try the wire inlay on the masts.  Yes, they come in pieces.

 

Hopefully someone might have a sail I can have to use as a sample for me.

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