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Stuart 10V model steam engine circa 1920s by Rik Thistle - 1:12 (est)


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Popeye,

 

Thanks. It was a fun build. These little engines and their full sized cousins produce a lot of power ...some say  a can of spinach is added to their boiler tanks at the start of each day 😉

 

This gentleman runs a professional steam powered workshop using no equipment made later than 1925* .... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WXHNBMLZZM  He deserves a medal for doing this.

 

Interestingly, steam still provides most of the power we use today.

 

Richard

 

*He does admit to using some modern measuring equipment but tries to keep it out of sight.

 

Edited by Rik Thistle
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A wonderful job Rik!  I hope that you get to run it, at least on compressed air.

 

Many many years ago when I was in engineering school, our thermodynamics class went on a field trip to the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn Michigan, about 25 miles from Ann Arbor where the University of Michigan is located.  At that time, the museum had a large collection of steam engines ranging from a Newcomen Atmospheric engine to a relatively recent steam turbine.

 

The most spectacular was a very large Corliss stationary mill engine, c1880.  The flywheel was probably 30ft in diameter and 4 ft wide, the bottom half was  of course in a pit in the floor.  Our guide, a retired mechanical engineer asked if we’d like to see it run.  It turns out that it was hooked up to compressed air. By manually manipulating the valves he singlehandedly got this huge engine running.  It was beautifully balanced and very quiet.  Quite impressive.

 

Roger

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Hi Roger,

 

 I hope that you get to run it, at least on compressed air.

 

I'll post a short report when I do - a compressor is on order.

 

Just done a quick read-up on the Corliss engine ...very impressive, and 30% more efficient than any other competitor, which is a huge advantage.

 

Here is a model version which looks superb .... https://www.1stdibs.co.uk/furniture/more-furniture-collectibles/collectibles-curiosities/models-miniatures/complex-working-corliss-steam-engine-model/id-f_6868103/   No info though on the builder that I can see.

 

Richard

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An interesting note on the Corliss type engines, is that the valves were partially controlled by vacuum dashpots, like were used on some cars. Most models of them get around this, somehow.

 

Several years ago, there was an article in a machining/steam model magazine, about a modeler that actually build a 1/32 scale one with working dashpots! He also used completely scale nuts and bolts, for which he made his own taps and dies! Some of the bolts had to be viewed through extreme magnification to even see. He also made a complete scale set of tools capable of installing all the fasteners!

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Ron,

 

I had a Google for the model you mention but no luck...it sounds exquisite though.

 

I did find this YT video on how museums actually built models of the day down to very fine detail ... https://www.nms.ac.uk/explore-our-collections/stories/science-and-technology/corliss-engine/   That would be a very pleasant job, working in the museum caring for those models.

 

Richard

Edit: I wonder if this might be the model you refer to Ron?... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXOJ1UEfikI

 

Edited by Rik Thistle
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