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I have recently taken delivery of the book Legacy of a ship model: examining HMS Princess Royal, 1773, by Rob Napier, published by Seawatch Books, Florence, Oregon, USA. It was first published in 2011.

 

First of all this is an outstanding production! A beautiful book! The publisher's are to be commended on the quality of production. It is landscape format, printed on quality paper and is profusely illustrated with numerous full-colour photographs, very clear line drawings (many multi-coloured), reproductions of contemporary marine paintings and x-rays showing internal fittings, fixtures and construction techniques. In terms of the writing, the author is as competent an author as he is a skilled craftsman; his text, his technical descriptions, are all easy to follow and flow equally as well. 

 

In essence this book is a very detailed and comprehensive record of the almost complete restoration of a significant model from the Henry Huddleston collection housed in the museum of the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. The author, a highly skilled and talented professional ship model maker, describes the dismantling of the model and every single step required to restore and/or rebuild those parts of the model that so required this work.

 

Included with my copy was a CD that has a short film about the project.

 

In the author's own admission what he has presented here through this book is a record of his work so that future generations of restorers might better understand what has been done; what was original and what had to be replaced in the restoration process. Nothing is missing and nothing has been over-looked. The book opens with a history of the original ship.

 

Through the dismantling and restoration process an insight is offered into the highly developed techniques used when the model was constructed. Sadly, but inevitably, there are no records as to who the various model makers were, but their legacy is a beautiful example of the ship model makers art from the 18th century.

 

Rob Napier is to be congratulated on a significant contribution to the literature of ship model making and to our better understanding of the techniques of earlier generations. 

Edited by Torrens
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  • 3 years later...

I just got this book for Father's Day from my son and I wanted to add my very favorable impressions from page 1 to page 197.  Incredible, just simply incredible.

 

I read half the book last night, finishing it up today.  The pictures are numerous, spot on and just simply go on and on.  As a builder of a plank on frame model I found this insight into an original 3 decker build very informative and will help me going forward.  For example it is okay to simplify some structures (the one piece after cistern as an example), or have a non functioning tiller.  It is okay to use 'SWOPEM'  (Situation Where One Part Equals Many).  Great to see was the presentation of 'Nobody's Perfect.'  A pictorial of things found on the model that were obvious mistakes or modifications made to account for fit by the original builder was awesome.  They happen to everyone and glad to see (once again) it is okay to keep them on the model.

 

My only 'regret' (maybe too harsh) is that the middle deck memory board (picture taken form directly above) is only one page in size, whereas the rest are a full two pages in size.  I would LOVE to have access to these pics in a digital format.  SO much to take in and learn from.

 

I expect to pick this book up many times.  When things are going slow, when I need some inspiration or I am figuring out how to advance my build in a particular area. 

 

A wonderful resource, a wonderful read and a book that I will keep close at hand.  I highly recommend, especially those that are either in a PoF build, or have one under their belt.  So much information about the internals of a ship model.

 

Mark

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  • 5 weeks later...

I bought this book last year. It's a good reference. Looking forward to make drawings of HMS PRINCESS ROYAL and shipmodel in  the near future.But it require a lot of knowledge of ship model-Beyond my ability, so I am looking forward to developing this project together with somebody who have common desire and knowledge of ship model.

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Hi Hjx,

 

You have a very nice  and a big project. Here is a guess on the duration of this kind of project.

 

To be able to build a highly detailed model could be a job of many years, something like +/- 10.

 

Part 1 : +/- 5 years

Research of available documentation : 1-2 years

 

Plans redrawn with a higher level of details in 2D with the most difficult details in 3D : 2-3 years

------------------------------------------

Part 2 : 5 years

 

Building the model 

 

 

 

What a satisfaction to be able to travel all this road! The first time is the most difficult, the second time is much easier because you saw the road once.

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I don't have this book yet but by the accolades herein it is surely one for my library.

 

I had the good fortune to spend some time with Rob when he lived in North Chatham MA. It was in the 1980's and when I would vacation there I would visit his shop. He was an incredible modeler even then and of course remains so. What I found, possibly even more remarkable, was his incredibly detailed documentation of his works. To say they complimented his projects wouldn't do them justice. To me they were in themselves works of art. At the time they were hand drawn and printed.

 

I can't imagine his published books to be anything less than that!

 

Joe

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9 hours ago, Gaetan Bordeleau said:

Hi Hjx,

 

You have a very nice  and a big project. Here is a guess on the duration of this kind of project.

 

To be able to build a highly detailed model could be a job of many years, something like +/- 10.

 

Part 1 : +/- 5 years

Research of available documentation : 1-2 years

 

Plans redrawn with a higher level of details in 2D with the most difficult details in 3D : 2-3 years

------------------------------------------

Part 2 : 5 years

 

Building the model 

 

 

 

What a satisfaction to be able to travel all this road! The first time is the most difficult, the second time is much easier because you saw the road once.

Thanks Gaetan Bordeleau

    I quite agree with you. As you said, developing a set of drawings is a huge project,so I never started the project yet.

 

    I have been thinking about how to reduce development time, improve the professional level of drawings, and quickly make model to validate the design.So I have been purchasing some specialized shipmodel books and drawings for the past two years,study other's build-log and look for opportunities to communicate with others-although my poor English restricts me.Then I thought of using numerical control(CN) to make shipmodel and improve efficiency and accuracy - though it was not" traditional" or "unorthodox",And I use french 64gun and flute zeehaen to do numerical control practice,CNC machining can be used to produce complex frames, keel, sculpture(figurehead) quickly , and the size is very accurate.

 

    Another way is to find partners, 2-3 peoples perform their duties,discuss the structure together,  1-2 person responsible for textual research and design, the other one responsible for making the model and verifying the design,it can reduce the development cycle.

 

    Ship model commercial development will also become very convenient,because my circle of friends including casting factory, wood processing plants, furniture factory, CNC machining,Desktop-CNC engraving machine factory, printing factory, foreign trade company...It's even easy to find some professional Carvers to make figurehead by hand.But the lack of copyright-copyright of ship model drawings.So, original development is necessary.

 

    Maybe business discussions here might be wrong.But even if only for hobby, to develop this set of drawings,I'm also looking forward to do it, because this is my hobby.

 

    

 

 

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This book is a real treasure.  

 

I might also suggest that his earlier book, "Reconditioning an 18th Century Ship Model Valkenisse Retourrschip of 1717" is even better.  It contains a mountain of useful information on his techniques, materials and photo documentation of his work on this valuable model.    BTW, the model is in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.                 Duff

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Hjx,

 

I like to read from peoples with experience in 3D. To create a team of ‘’expert’’ is an innovative way of thinking but close to 100% of MSW forum build model ship alone, and some fortunate discuss the subject in clubs.

 

MSW forum can also be  a very educative tool. Many problems of construction are resolved with the help of members from this forum. Does this forum could be a platform for a common project?

 

Personally, my satisfaction is to build  with wood, I have no interest in the commercial aspect. To produce a 3D kit is another area.

 

I would like to buy ‘’the Perfect set of Model ShipPlans 2D-3D’’ and you help me to understand that these plans need many hours before it can be executed.

 

There are many possible different model ship which can be chosen to draw plans and HMS Princess Royal could be one of them. Are there plans from a museum, I do not know?

 

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Hi Gaetan

I have to use Google translator to communicate with you, so I will reply more slowly. I answer some of your questions all if I know.

 

Your idea is feasible and can be implemented by games such as UE4 or UNIYT5.It seems that the two 3D game engines (or one of them) are free, but it's function is very powerful, looking at the result of them-it's the version 2 years ago.

5974982734465_webwxgetmsgimg(1).thumb.jpg.61fdfb079121df2ed1e484ab69099f8f.jpg

unity4 ,The result of unity5 will be stronger,

597498a0e1c76_QQ20170723203554.jpg.16f59449b1a6e4be57c2ba9ee1bdcfc3.jpg

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597498a617c46_QQ20170723203606.jpg.87dec74002ea878ab19849d26be65c68.jpg

the result of UE4 earlier version ,this is not the final rendered picture, this is a live picture!

I once wanted to imitate Roger's collection and make a virtual ship model Museum,and made some 3D ship models.I have made some UE4 scenes, and tested the effect of wood material,shown as following:

59749a0569837_QQ20170723203541.thumb.jpg.0a88886b72a3dda9d9e065cf2adb4894.jpg

59749a06612f6_QQ20170723203548.jpg.a6613cf970a6f50e928bfb3b11838f57.jpg

The ship model build in UE4 is close to the museum's effect,but I didn't go on with my idea, and I'd like to make a actual model-Because I want to learn the CNC milling machine operation, NC programming.

 

 

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I also learned C++, because I like AI programming very much(Including CNC machining programming)the programme of  figurehead processing,  I have done it myself.UE4 is not so difficult(make shipmodel). I can do it at all - I'm not a professional programmer,but it takes a lot of energy.I estimate the demand for 3D drawings is minimal, so I have not see anyone doing it.

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If you make a 3D ship model with UE4, you'll operate it like a 3D game.You can even make virtual ship models in 3D virtual scenes.

 

To build this 3D drawing, we first build the 3D model, and make the high polygon model and the low polygon model,Make UV,maps, normal maps...,Generally use 3DMAX and texture mapping software,then import model into UE4.Then programming, UE4 should be using C language and unity4, unity5 using C language .With the program, the scene is just as operational as the 3D game.

 

 

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Another way is that you learn to use 3d/2d software. You can learn CAD + RHINO/ SOILDWORKS/UG,But I guess you have to study photoshop,I don't know how I can learn 3DMAX, CAD, rhino, silo, ZBrush, Vray, Mudbox, rhinocam, Photoshop, UE4,unity,DAZ...about more than a dozen:piratetongueor4:,But these are self taught for 20 years,It seems unlikely that you will learn so much.I suggest you learn PS and CAD,Other 3D software models can be imported into CAD.

 

As for the time you asked,It maybe takes more than half a year to make a 3D ship model.

 

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2 hours ago, druxey said:

There are several plans of Princess Royal, 1773, in the Royal Museums Greenwich collection .

Yes druxey

A project I'm going to finish and a project I'm about to start, and a project I want to do in the future, are all starting with NMM's original drawings.

HMS CUMBERLAND 1774

5974a9d80dd58_QQ20170723203541.thumb.jpg.d9d22cadb84c70e529e645122257acff.jpg

5974a9de5b4f1_QQ20170723203548.thumb.jpg.02ea41417d61605c8737bd759e8263f5.jpg

5974a9f81076d_QQ20170723203554.thumb.jpg.21a894bbd3dd2523b8c24eeb678763f8.jpg

I made the figurehead of  L'ARTÉSIEN by ZBrush, which is the practice for HMS CUMBERLAND in the future.The first time I saw HMS CUMBERLAND was the background map of the forum, and I ’m very interested in it , but I have to prepare information and ship model knowledge.

 

 I personally think it's a little expensive- NMM Original drawings, about 60 pounds per one. I don't need so large size and I want to buy some more, It's better to have an electronic version(tiff or jpeg). The price is 20 pounds per one or more cheaper.:piratetongueor4:

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