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For anyone interested, Modellers Shipyard (in Australia) currently has this seminal work available for $50 (AUD). They also have several of the AOTS series availed at $59. I've no idea of shipping costs, and I have no connection with the company.

 

Here is a link:

 

http://www.modelshipyard.com.au/books/

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At the time of writing this post, this book is also available new via Amazon.co.uk, starting at £21.74. 

 

As Grant says, it is a seminal work and, at the time of first publication, one of the finest ship model making books to have been written, though it still remains a classic even if books on ship model making have progressed significantly since the mid 1950s.

 

Longridge's model of HMS Victory was donated to The Science Museum, South Kensington, London, with his equally impressive Cutty Sark. I don't know whether they are still on display as it's been some years since I last visited the museum. Sadly, the last time I did see them they were both suffering from damage which looked very much like it was the result of warping, probably because some materials had not seasoned sufficiently at the time of the build. It could also be that Longridge's workshop was prone to damp.

Edited by Torrens

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Michael,

 

The Science Museum closed its maritime gallery last year and replaced it with a display of mobile phones!!!

 

Longridge's models are now in storage.

 

John

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Fortunately for us, Longridge's books are NOT in storage! He was a trail-blazer for many of us.

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Sad, of course it is.  But think about it.  In 100 years people will look at these phones and shake their heads in amazement at how people had to use a hard device to communicate rather than telepathy or whatever they will be using by then.  It will be as interesting to them as ship models are to us.   That said, ship models are by far more beautiful and the intricate details that we see were made lovingly by hand, not robotic arms.

Allan

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I find it incredible and beyond comprehension that the ship model gallery at the Science Museum has closed, and this has nothing to do with my subjective interest in ships, because it was via water that civilisations came together and, in most cases, developed positively as a race!

 

I wonder in what state Longridge's models are now in, or will be in in a few years time - and indeed the other, older models from the collection are in (the museum has a small but important collection of models from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries). We can only hope the storage facilities are well-controlled in terms of humidity, etc.

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I first purchased this book in 1981, some time ago 2or 3 years ago I lent it to someone......The operative word here is someone.....and I did not write it down, I cannot remember who it was and so a few weeks ago I ordered a new copy, it arrived this afternoon, I am a happy camper this evening.

IMG_5126x1024.thumb.jpg.7f2211f412cc7e18e193169aa142c4d8.jpg

 

What a great resource this book is, and i just love the fold out drawings of the rigging.

 

Just wanted to share my joy.

 

Michael

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No model maker should be without it, a true classic.

I have two copies, an original dating from 1970, much dog eared and marked with pencil notes, with falling apart plans.

… and a pristine copy dating from 2002.

Shame about the parlous condition his iconic model has been allowed to fall into, and no longer on display as I understand.

 

B.E.

 

 

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Bragging rights here: I own a now very dilapidated first edition copy - dust jacket long gone - which I purchased in 1955 with a book token won in a Model Engineer math competition. I was all of ten years old at the time! I read it cover to cover many times over. It's still a great classic.

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I am not sure if it is just my memory, but it seems to me that the photographs in this copy are no where near as crisp and sharp as the ones in my 1981 copy.

Druxey a first edition, I am envious. The only book I ever won was "Metals in the Service of Man" for getting my O level metalwork when I was 14.

 

Michael

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4 hours ago, michael mott said:

The only book I ever won was "Metals in the Service of Man" for getting my O level metalwork when I was 14.

Now we can begin to understand better the origins of your superb metalwork Michael!!!

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I've made several comments about the Science Museum debacle and the state of the Longridge model just before the entire collection 'vanished'. SHAMEFULL.

The book is a masterpiece written by a true historian and master model maker. I have two copies and am struggling to justify a third!

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