Jump to content

Mare Nostrum by Probablynot - FINISHED - Artesania Latina - wood


Recommended Posts

u're right , both of us almost in the same area in our build 

 

your boat also looks nice , apparently u too like me working without power tools , the boxes tell :) , I have mine done 2 , but there are this +/- 1mm differences , I'm planning to redo them later

 

have fun Brian

 

Mohamad

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yippee!  Got the hull finished today.  The rubbing strakes and all the stanchions are fitted, also the cleats and the bulwark rails.  Time for a bit of finishing.
I had intended to go mad, and apply grain filler before I varnished the hull.  But my local supplier didn't have grain filler.  Not a problem.  I looked carefully at the hull, and I decided this was a model that didn't have to be all that finicky-perfect.  I've done a decent job with the second planking (I told myself) and I could live with any gaps or grain that showed themselves.

Ah.  But my ancient tin of yacht varnish wouldn't open!  Well yes, it did (eventually), and there was a really thick skin of dried-out stuff that I nad to get rid of before I could proceed!
It's good yacht varnish!  I've had it for at least 35 years.  I added about 10 percent of white spirit, gave it a stir, and ended up with a super varnish.
Which I applied.
Lovely.  Unlike the modern 'clear varnish' stuff, it slightly (and nicely) darkened the walnut planks.  Eight hours have now passed, and I've already done a tentative bit of sandpapering.  I might be able to apply a second coat tomorrow.
I'm only dealing with the hull varnishing now.  When that's done (three coats at least) I'll try to bring everything together.

On the subject of grain filler, I did a lot of web-searching to see what was available nowadays.  Lots of proprietary brand stuff, of course.  But I remembered that when my dad had a job that required grain-filling, he just used plaster of Paris!
So in readiness for my next build, I've ordered some plaster of Paris.  Finest quality, and just £1 for half a kilo of it!  You make a paste with methylated spirit. You can mix in an appropriate wood dye, or leave it white and skim over later with an appropriate dye.

And I've started to make the rigging.  Very intricate, very fiddly!

More picture will come.  In due course.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't wait to see the photos.   I'm betting she will be beautiful.

 

I'm wondering about the "darkening wood" concept being only with older finishes.  My experience is that oil based varnishes or oils like boiled linseed oil will darken wood while the acrylics will not.  When I want a bullet proof finish for furniture that adds 'depth' to the wood I mix 1/3 boiled linseed oil, 1/3 poly and 1/3 mineral spirits.  This makes a really thin wipe on that penetrates well and darkens and protects.

Edited by PopJack
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, Here's La Petite Nella (LS4331) (formerly Mare Nostrum 4331) as she has so far been built.
Three coats of 40-year-old Ronseal varnish, sanded after each, then wax polished.  That's the outside hull only - the deck has only had one coat of a clear (new) varnish so far, and most of the superstructure is still bare wood.

I didn't like the black-on-white labels AL supplied for the fishboxes, and anyway I wanted to add 'LS' (for Les Sables d'Olonne, Vendée, France).  So I printed out some new ones, white text on a black background, on sticky labels.  I think they look OK.  I'll put a coat of clear varnish over them, later on, to give them a degree of protection.  (Yes, I've tested it already - the varnish doesn't cause the print to 'bleed'.)

I had a bit of a problem with the trawl-boards.  The AL kit indicates that you wrap a fairly thick brass wire around them, but none of the supplied wires was long enough to do it!  Luckily I'd bought (on ebay) a 4-metre length of jewellers' brass wire, so I used that.  Thinner than AL specified, but I think 0.8mm wire fits the scale better.
I've still got a lot to do.  But the AL instructions say I've already done the hardest part, so I'm hoping it'll be easy from here on to the finish!

Oh, and a propos some discussion in another MSW thread, I'm insisting that my build is a MODEL, not a mere ornament!  My new hobby isn't ornament-making, it's model ship building!

 

post-25-0-45886600-1367523712_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How are we supposed to fix the fish-boxes onto the rack?

Presumably, if the rack represents some sort of real-life construction, there would have been two hooks on each fish box to fix it to the rack.  Or there would have been hooks on the rack designed to link in with the fish-boxes?

AL doesn't say.

So I guess I just get the glue out and stick the boxes on the rack so that they, er, look all right.  Right?

What did other Mare Nostrummers do?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like PopJack, I piled mine on the deck. This is a model, neither an ornament nor a REPLICA. There are more odd things which are very irrealistic like the construction of the otter boards. It rest on a kind of bar which surely will dump into the sea when the otter boards are in use. A decent place to store the nets is lacking. How did the crew manage to get the fishboxes in to the refrigerator room at the stem of the ship? Nevertheless I still love the look of this model.

 

Regards,

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I super-glued the fish-boxes to the rack.

I should have applied a single coat of clear, satin varnish first!  Too bad - I'll now have to be satisfied with varnishing only where a narrow paintbrush can reach!

Those trawl boards ("sliding doors", as AL calls them) are very fiddly things to make.  I ended up soldering the four 'legs' together, then putting a cosmetic binding of thread over the soldered part.  The 'planking' on them is 4mm-wide oak instead of 5mm mahogany.

I didn't use the black 'hawser points' that AL supplied.  I didn't like the way they looked on the inboard side.  I found four little brass eyelets in my stationery cupboard, and filed them down to half the thickness of the bulwarks, Then I painted them black and applied them to both sides of the hawser holes.

 

post-25-0-55111800-1367607653_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been making good progress with the fiddly bits this weekend.

Engine assembled and installed.  I even took the trouble to oak-plank the little plinth on which the engine is fitted.  (Note:  The engine parts didn't 'fit' together.  They just more or less leaned against each other, and superglue was very reluctant to get to grips with them.  However, it did.  Eventually.)

The winch is assembled and installed (on its plinth).  The little black glass beads (lever handles) didn't fit easily onto the wire I used for the handles - in fact one of them shattered when I tried to put them on.  Luckily I have a stash of little beads (leftovers from a previous hobby) and I found a couple of wooden ones that fitted.  To me they look better, although I do admit they're not exactly to scale;

The forward hatch (the one with the 6 rings) is assembled, but not yet attached to the deck.

When I installed the engine, I took great care to ensure that the pokey-up bit (the exhaust pipe?) would line up with where the brass funnel goes!  Turns out it actually does project high enough for it to be necessary to align the parts!  However, this may be just because I'd added 0.6mm to the height of the engine, when I planked the little L-shaped plinth the engine is mounted on.

 

OK, as a newbie to this fascinating and absorbing (and potentially expensive) hobby, I'll admit how surprised I am how quickly the finishing stages of a kit build can go.  A week ago I'd have said I had another three months of work to do.  But now, my guess is that I'll have finished this build by the middle of May.  Rigging and all!  Although the dreaded word 'ratlines' is still there to worry me.  Admittedly the ratlines on this model only go across two verticals, but frankly, even if they were six verticals across, I'd still fail to see (right now) why they strike such terror in the hearts of so many ship modellers!

post-25-0-91700800-1367707113_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Concerning the boxes, once again:

One of the lines that go to the lifting pole in the front is shown fastened in such a way that it interferes with the boxes.  I was going to tie is somewhere else, but SWMBO said it looked better tied as shown on the box. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the warning, Popjack.  I'll watch out for it when I do the rigging.

Which will probably be fairly soon!  The engine hatch is done (funnel and all), and I've nearly finished the control cabin.  I only have to make the aft hatch, then I'll be on to all the thin, vertical-pole stuff and the rigging.

 

Boy, am I glad I discovered MSW!  So much useful information, so many nice people!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At last, she bears the name I decided to give her!

I didn't like the way AL leaves the edges of some bits of plywood bare.  In this instance, it was the edges of the control cabin roof that bothered me.  I toyed with the idea of applying edging strips to hide the plywood, but thought that would have been gilding the lily.  In the event I just painted the edges black.

post-25-0-78401200-1367875892_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, those three black port-holes got me curious.  Why bother to line the main windows with clear acetate sheet, but leave the portholes unglazed?

I dug out my old leather punch (with a selection of hole punch sizes on a wheel) and punched out three little discs of acetate that neatly fitted into the black surrounds.  A careful application of superglue, and wa-hay!  A thoroughly glazed control cabin!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The deck pic below shows where I've got so far.  I'm still working on that little cabin hatchway.

The other pic shows a rather silly error I've just noticed.  I drilled the hole for the prop shaft at the wrong angle - it looks as though the engine ought to be deep in the bilges!

The hole's only about 6mm deep, but the 2mm diameter brass shaft is held in there by superglue.  Would I cause horrible damage if I tried to give it a twist with a pair of pliers and remove it?

I think it would be too awkward to fill the hole and then try to re-drill it.  I was thinking of putting a 10° bend in the shaft such that the bend would be just  inside the hole, and putting it back.  Any other suggestions, anyone?  Please?

post-25-0-03930000-1368656115_thumb.jpg

post-25-0-32307500-1368656129_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, and I've been thinking about the plinth I'll need to make.  The kit doesn't include a plinth.
Yes, there's a sorry-looking little metal plaque saying 'Mare Nostrum'.  But no base, no plinth.  And as my build is now called 'La Petite Nella', even the plaque is pretty useless!
The lumber yards here don't seems to stock lengths of hardwood these days.  Oh, I expect I could order some online, from somewhere, at an outrageous price, but I looked around for alternatives.
I found a second-hand furniture shop that had a mahogany shelf for sale.  A HUGE shelf - 5ft long, 18 inches deep and nearly an inch thick!  And with two absolutely massive (2 inches thick) solid mahogany brackets to support it!

I got it for £15 ($23)!
I'll thickness/plane off the surfaces, cut round the bits that look as though they might contain metal, and end up with a LOT of usable mahogany.  Oh, the joys of woodworking!
And La Petite Nella will now have a mahogany plinth!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The shelf sounds like a great idea!   I have about 1,000 board feet of hardwood in my shop- my first thought on reading your dilemma was to mail you a chunk, but I don't think I could do it for $23.00!  I mounted mine on a  chunk of rock- and I'm really pleased with the mounting.

 

I may not be be picky enough, but I don't think the prop is all that noticeable.  If it takes more than an twist with a pair of pliers, I'd think that it wouldn't be worth the damage that removal might cause.

 

post-2255-0-80169600-1368662859_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great idea, using a rock, Popjack!  Yours certainly looks good!

When I saw what you'd done, I did toy with the idea of mounting La Petite Nella on a little slab of slate.  Slate is natural where I live (I could probably find a suitable piece just by sticking a spade in my garden!), and the rocks along the coast where I met up with the original 'La Petite Nella' were very similar.  But I'd have difficulties making a suitable cradle to go with the underlying rock, so I'm taking the easy way out!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Brian,

 

First of all, your Mare, oh sorry Nella is looking great !

 

First question about the rudder, what I did is the following: the rudder is out of proportion so I sanded down the top of it till it fits. Have placed the shaft to be inserted in the hull at the right top edge of the rudder as per the photo instruction sheet. If I understood well what you did, you wont have problems since the hole you now drilled will be covered by the rudder this way. A bit of putty makes it completely invisible.

 

The plinth for my Mare was included in the kit.

 

Hope this helps a bit.

 

Regards,

John

 

Regards,

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...