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Niagara by lb0190 - Model Shipways - 1/64 - Wood POB

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Larry-  Lots of progress.  On the sequence for finishing, find what you like on a sample and then stick with it.  Everyone probably has a different way of doing it.

 

If you caulked with #1 pencil, make sure the planks are clean (free of graphite) before you continue.  I have seen some of that graphite get on the deck and you wont see it until the finish is applied.  I did a little sanding, vacuumed, wiped off with a little 91% alcohol and finally tack clothed.  Just a precaution.

 

After staining, I used Floquil Glaze to seal the deck.  I'm used to it and I like it.  But MS satin finish should work great.  Always try on a sample!!!!!  Some folks do use Dullcoat.  Again, try it first. 

 

Lookin' forward to that deck :)

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Thanks guys...  Augie, I was not aware of the issue with #1 pencils throwing more dust. The funny thing is, I have two pencils I sat aside to try for planking, but neither have a number on them. As I mentioned before, one is from a golf course and the other is a carpenters pencil, which I like better since the lead is much thicker and less easy to break. I make sure I clean off any lead dust - thanks for the heads up.

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Yes, pencil 'leads' vary in hardness.  It's an alpha-numeric system but to make it simple for us there is the commonly used numeric only system 1-4 with 1 being the 'softest' and 4 the 'hardest'.  So a #1 will tend to smudge more than a #4.

 

I'll bet that's more then you ever wanted to know about graphite pencils :)

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I use a semi gloss lacquer....if you have something close to that...that good as well.  you don't want to have a glossy deck.  I notice your running it from port to starboard......would it look better if it ran from counter to bow?  it's just that I notice the slight curve that the deck is going to have,  and I see that it shows with the way your running it.   I'm sure there is a cabin wall to close this in......it will probably have the same curvature as the deck.  also,  you'll be able to continue the planking all the way to the bow...it will be uniform.  pencil is good for the calking.  I use two methods.....black crayon {which is kinda messy}......and an archive pen {black India ink}

 

a light sand before you seal it will blend any smudges and imperfections into the wood,  giving it a bit of a hue.  not to worry,  it will look good ;)

Edited by popeye the sailor

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Now I have a resource!

 

Since we're talking pencil’s, (no analogies intended) I have a mechanical pencil that ran out of lead and the replacement lead is marked as 0.5 HB which breaks way to easy. Which type would you suggest to reduce breakage?

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I use a semi gloss lacquer....if you have something close to that...that good as well.  you don't want to have a glossy deck.  I notice your running it from port to starboard......would it look better if it ran from counter to bow?  it's just that I notice the slight curve that the deck is going to have,  and I see that it shows with the way your running it.   I'm sure there is a cabin wall to close this in......it will probably have the same curvature as the deck.  also,  you'll be able to continue the planking all the way to the bow...it will be uniform.  pencil is good for the calking.  I use two methods.....black crayon {which is kinda messy}......and an archive pen {black India ink}

 

a light sand before you seal it will blend any smudges and imperfections into the wood,  giving it a bit of a hue.  not to worry,  it will look good ;)

 

Thanks Popeye. The endplack is the only plank that runs port to starboard, the remaining will run as you suggested. I have read where others have used the archive pen with good results. Do your two suggested markers leave different indicated widths between the planls? I've read about scraping planks but sanding sounds like an easier method.

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OK, just because I like you, here's the secret chart:

 

http://www.jetpens.com/articles/Article:_Picking_the_Perfect_Pencil_Lead_Hardness

 

Be wary that 'harder' doesn't necessarily mean stronger.  Your 0.5HB is  what we mere mortals call a #2.  A #3 would be 'harder' but might be more brittle.  You could also try getting a pencil that uses thicker 'lead'. 

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It's been a few days since I made a post, so I thought I should at least give an update on what I'm working on and the current status.

I decided now is the time to fix a few boo boos (boo boo = technical name for screw-ups  :D  ) that I've collected but delayed addressing, plus correcting a few I was not aware of until recently.

 

The first is a poor fitting plank on the port side aft gun port. A little wood filler, some sanding and careful painting was all that was needed to fill in a couple of voids. The bigger issues are flow line mismatch at bulkhead K (starboard side only) requiring adding a plank to the outside edge of the bulkhead and doing the same for the interior of bulkhead timberhorn J.

 

I tried fitting the first starboard ceiling plank but soon realized the there were more (minor) flowline issues where the gun/sweep framing was not mating up well with the flowline of the bulkheads. Sanding should resolve most of these issues and a more careful and detailed approach will be used when I frame up the port side.

 

The transom ceiling height needed finished and lowered as well as replacing both transom corner stiffeners that were placed incorrectly.

 

I found there is a lot of value in saving scrap and residual material from my previous ship (Geo W Washburn tugboat). I used some scrap basa wood to install the extra support for the deck fittings. I'll post a few pictures once I have some work that shows some forward progress.

 

 

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Hi Larry

We all need those " tidy up " days :)

I will look forward to seeing the pictures

 

Regards

Ken

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Good morning Ken. The first starboard ceiling plank (I hope I used the right terminology) goes in the paint shop this morning...

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Hey Larry, I look forward to seeing some of these ceiling planks on your Niagara. I have to agree with you on the value of saving scraps from older projects as well. There have been many times where I was able to prevent trips to the store by rummaging through old model boxes.

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Hi Patrick,

I installed one green plank and still undecided if I'm OK with it. The plank must have slipped in position just a tiny bit when I clamped it in place. There is a very small gap between the plank and the planksheer around the first two gun ports. After looking it over, the majority of the area will go away when I trim in the gun ports, so I think I'll trim and install the next plank to see how it looks before deciding if I'll keep it. Hmmmm, every ship has "the best side," maybe I'm simply ahead of the game in that respect. I installed the plank as one continuous board which made it more difficult than necessary. The remaining planks (when possible) will be installed as two pieces, using a gun port as the transition area.

 

Last weekend, I pulled my back, which currently does not like my sitting on the stool in the garage, so the past few days have been spent going to the Chiropracter and laying in the easy chair. Hopefully in a day or so I can start manufacturing sawdust again.

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The offending green plank has been removed! I could not stand seeing that small gap, so I carefully cut the glueline and was able to remove the plank after shortening the piece to approx three inches in length by cutting the plank at a gunport. I was surprised I was able to clean off the glue so the same piece can be re-installed after touching it up with some fresh paint. My error with this piece was not beveling the inside lower edge enough before installation. As the piece curved around the bow, it could not sit tightly against the planksheer. I wish I would have taken photos to share, in effort of saving some other greenhorn like myself from making this mistake.

 

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Congrats on the fix!  I'm sure photos will show up.

 

Yes, titanium did the trick.  Call me the $150,000 man (parts and labor) :)

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Today I reinstalled the plank I removed the other day, plus I sprayed three more planks that I planned on installing tomorrow. Unfortunately the spray results were awful. My airbrush is very picky about being very clean. The least amount of residual dried paint (as in specks hard to see) clogs it up and throws splatter. When it works right, it does an amazing job but the cleanup takes longer than the actual painting. I took a cleaning shortcut the last time I used it and apparently the airbrush gods were not too happy with me. It's not a big deal, I'll sand them down, repaint and then install. This will be another lesson learned, number 110,000,002.

 

Well..., this week has primarily consisted of complaints, whining and a few expletives thrown here and there with very little ship building. Now that it's out of my system (almost out – still gotta fix those darn planks with the bad paint job) it's time for some fwd progress.

Edited by lb0190

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don't be too hard on yourself.....get into the habit of doing a couple of test passes on a piece of plywood,  before committing paint to model.......I do it all the time.   I use a siphon feed..very little cleanup,  since the paint feed is outside of the airbrush.   it works like blow'in on a pop bottle.   you'll get it straightened out.........I'm sure ;)

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I can't comment on airbrushes.  But a little self-cleansing ...... letting the steam come out of your ears....never hurts.  You'll be ready for a fresh attack.

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Thanks guys. Today has been better. My back issues are almost gone and I've managed to install a few planks. I'm at the point where I beleive installing the planks without paint is an easier process so long as the first plank (lowest one) is painted to provide an area to mask from. With a littler luck I'll have the starboard side planked this weekend and maybe some of the sweeps and gunports trimmed in.

 

I'm learning a lot from from moving fwd on this side before framing in the port side. The port  side should go together much faster (gawd, I hope I did not jinx myself)...

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HI Larry,

 

Thank you for posting so many pictures of the framing and the stern.  I am currently wrestling with stern filler blocks and the arch board and what comes after. Being able to look through your sequence of additions really helps me to plan my work.

 

Joseph Osborne

Carlisle, PA USA

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Hello all,

First, thank you for all of the well wishes.

It's been quite a while since my last post and I've manged to get a little work done, so it's time to post a few photos. I'm 95% complete on the starbord inside planking. I have a lot of paint nicks to touch up and just general clean up work to do that I'll hold off on for a while longer. The gunports as well as the sweep ports need squared up but I'll do that after the hull planking is in place and the ports are cut in from the outside.

I gave up on trying to air brush the inside planks and simply brushed on the paint. It was too difficult to mask off for spraying. I brushed on 3-4 very thin coats and the results were OK.

My next steps are to frame in the port gun/sweep ports and then mount the inside port planks. Weather has been very hot, limiting my time in the garage, but mornings and evenings allow a few hours each day.

I hope everyone is well and enjoying the season.

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good to see you back in the shop.....even a little is a lot  ;)     I like the way the paint turned out.......I don't use my airbrush on everything either.......masking every time you turn around is a pain.  the bulwarks will look real good when the deck is planked.

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Hey Larry!  Great to see part of the Niagara team back in business.

 

Try and stay cool!

 

Oh.... painting looks really fine.

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Larry while you are struggling through perhaps one of the hard to bear times of the year,  I often say to my self in the deepest part of winter here in Canada I wish I had been born in Florida.  I love to see the inboard planks but also to see your great paint job.  From what I can tell from your pictures you and me think the same (or should can't stay on one task), and have completed the ports framing on one side and instead of completing the other side moving right on to planking instead... Your work looks great.

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Today, I completed the port side framing for the gun/sweep ports. After I sand down the rough spots I'll start planking the bulwarks from bow to stern.

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Edited by lb0190

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Gee, I hope that back comes around.  I know the feelings.

 

On the hull/deck planking.  I did the hull first....but I'm not sure it makes any difference. 

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Hi Augie,

 

I'm leaning toward doing the hull first which would allow me to brush on a coat of glue or epoxy on the interior side of the hull planks, but man I really want to see the ship with a deck in place... patience, patience...

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Oh for crying out loud.  That's what I did and forgot completely.  Yes, I think the coat or two of glue inside really helps seal things up.  Made the hull ring like a Louisville Slugger after the glue dried.  You answered your own question!!!!!

 

I used 2 coats of diluted PVA (maybe 50%).  But diluted 30 minute epoxy would work as well.

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I've made some progress this week on the port side bulwark planking. I have a bow plank clamped in place and drying from being soaked in hot water. I hope to soak another plank tonight so I can glue the remaining two in place and then start cutting in the gun/sweep ports, followed by sanding, priming and painting.

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Edited by lb0190

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