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Pardon me if this has been discussed before but quick question. The CA glue I have doesn't work with metal on wood. I'm guessing this is because the wood absorbs the CA and the metal loosens from the connection? Example is oar locks, they seem to keep popping out regardless of the amount of CA I used. This also happened with the rope walk I built. Should I use model cement or wood glue? Thanks.

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There are two types of CA glues (IMHO): the "regular" very thin instant-drying;   and the thicker types that can span small gaps better than the regular CA,  AND these glues do NOT bond instantly but are "accelerated" by a spray-on product.  The thicker types are the ones I use and I love them!  They bond to just about anything, are not "messy" if used with care, and they can be adjusted for a final positioning before "setting" with that spray. They can be found in model aircraft hobby shops.

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  • 2 months later...

Not sure about the "contact cement" but I do know the 2 part epoxy is the better choice in my option. You need to make sure it is mix real good and you should try and rough the surface. But like I said this is my option, everyone has there special choice and what works for others doesn't always work for you. You should test before using, that would be the best way to find what your looking for.

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I used this stuff extensively while gluing the metal figures to the wooden parts in my Vasa. This thing performs brilliantly for that job.

I am not sure how it's called in other countries. Here it's called "Repair Extreme" and is a thick paste-like substance that adheres dissimilar materials, and the excess, if you let it dry a small amount of time, can be withdraw with tweezers like rubber. I just love this stuff.

 

 

 

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The thin CA  does absorb quickly into the wood, sometimes not leaving any glue to bond anything. If the wood has been sealed, I use thin CA. If not, then I use thick CA. This is when I am too lazy to mix up epoxy, which is much better. Model cement wouldn't work because it is designed to melt the plastic joins together. Wood glue, as with model cement, won't have any effect on metal parts. Make sure that you metal is completely clean. There will be oils on it, not only from the machining process but your fingers as well, that will effect glues.

   Ron W.

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  • 3 months later...

When using the two part epoxies, how small a quantity can be mixed? My experience with epoxies is that they come in pretty large size containers and extracting the minute quantity needed to be mixed, of each part, would be rather difficult. Mixing more than needed would waste a lot of expensive stuff.

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When using 2 part epoxy I will generally try to mix up just enough to do the job.  Usually just a few dabs of each If there is a little to much so be it.  You have to play around a little to learn how much you are going to need at any one moment.

David B

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That makes sense and it would work well to not waste it.  I'm probably harking back to when I was mixing up batches of resin and catalyst for surfboard repairs and the two ingredients weren't mixed in anything like a true proportion.  You had to judge and experience how much catalyst to put in or the stuff would burn up (which was sometimes fun to do deliberately -- when you're seventeen).  With the epoxies I'm guessing its strictly one to one so a little dab of one and the same dab of the other and you got a good mix.

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Noticed the question about contact cement, yes it would probably work well if the metal was roughed up and clean. Your metal part would remain just where you first placed it if you followed the instructions to the letter. I use contact cement a lot with leather, but don't quite always follow the directions, sometimes I make contact between the pieces a little early so I have the opportunity to move the piece around a bit if needed, If I can trim, then I let both pieces dry before making contact between  the two and then whack it a few times with a wooden hammer, makes a good strong flexible joint that is often stitched and sometimes riveted. Like the pinning advice mentioned above.

jud

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I like epoxy myself. Mostly due to its far superior shear stregnth when compared to ca glue. I would hate to see some wood to metal bond in some later inaccessible area to be hit by an errant tool and be instantly unretrievable, not to mention impossible , to reinstall.

 

I saw on another forum that epoxy, when the two parts are still separate, cleans easily with rubbing alcohol. When the two parts are mixed and still not hardened, they clean up with white vinegar. Have not tested this myself so if anyone is willing to try this with their next venture of epoxy use, let us know.

 

You can buy small syringes, in some places, without a prescription (like insulin syringes) that could be used to draw up small amounts of the two parts for making epoxy, using separate syringes of course. Then wash out the syringes with rubbing alcohol.

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That's interesting because on my Badger, I used Gorilla glue, which is a type of PVA, to glue some metal parts to wood with no problem.  These were mostly smaller pieces though, and I'm not sure if they would work on larger/heavier pieces.  Personally, I can't stand CA, but it's probably just user error.

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Thank you.  I was going to use it to glue in my brass hawse pipes.  I will go get some CA gel or epoxy instead.  I'll need it anyway for lots of other ornaments.  I have what is called "gap filling" CA, but its still pretty runny, and dries in 5-15 seconds.  Is this the gel or is there stuff that is actually called CA Gel?

 

As long as I have someone on the line, and speaking of brass, maybe another quick question -- is there some household product that will "weather" those shiny new brass hawse pipes and make them look more like weathered bronze?  I'd like to do that before I glue them in.

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No-one has mentioned the use of PVA or carpenters glue.  Is that cause it is no good for metal to wood?

One more vote against PVA for bonding metal.

Elmer's just came out with a 'New Product' called Probond Advanced. It is touted to bond almost anything to anything but even the MSDS gives no clue what it actually is. All they tell you is 'not available'.

I bought some and bonded wood to wood. It was no better than Titebond II. Besides, the price for a 2 ounce jar was more than the 8 ounce Titebond.

Then I bonded two pieces of aluminum with a 3/4 x 3/4 inch overlap. I followed the instructions (sanded the two surfaces, clamped them and let it cure for 24 hours). When I grabbed the two, the bar fell right off in my hand.

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Epoxy is the way to go for metals.

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