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Bow shape of Le François 1683 and La Néréïde 1722


Waldemar
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I would have to look at Sutherland's work again, and also read the article you provided.

 

Now, after your latest post, I am assuming that the method you refer to, gave a profile of the various frames consisting of just one arc, but of variable radii (plus, naturally, a hollow/floor curve), as in the Sutherland's work. Indeed, of extremely elegant simplicity in an engineering sense, and giving visually elegant shapes. For these reasons I wanted to use it in my reconstruction, but in the end the 'classical' method prevailed, very widespread and known for centuries for sure, in which a few templates/moulds were used to geometrically determine the contours of all the frames. That is, the radius of the respective frame arcs was constant all along the hull length (in effect, the 'hauling futtocks up/down' method).

 

 

Edited by Waldemar
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21 hours ago, druxey said:

Moneypenny and Antscherl, A Restoration Yacht’s Design Secrets Revealed, Mariners Mirror, Volume 107, Issue 2, May 2021.

 

I only have quick access to issues of the Mariner's Mirror up to 2000, but I have just located newer issues in my local library 🙂. Going there soon to pick up this article and after reading it, everything will be clear. Thanks again for this reference.

 

 

image.gif

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I decided to check more early plans of the French origin for the shape of the bow curve. Specifically, how often logarithmic curves were or may have been used to create them.

 

 

1679 – Project of a 1st rate ship of the line:

 

image.jpeg.59a8a116660c436234de4fdaa93f2d89.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.22f4789426784782b675e8ebcaa8b39c.jpeg

 

 

1679 – Le Neptune, 50 guns:

 

image.jpeg.84007d32db32add8c82be19a3d451466.jpeg

 

image.jpeg.df17c393b946a62b55894fcececc4f12.jpeg

 

 

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Yes, the end, but only the original plans, because I also want to show another way of constructing the bow curve shown in the work of Jean Boudriot, Les vaisseaux de 50 & 64 canons. Étude historique 1650-1780. This method must come from the 18th century French works on naval architecture (I should verify this, but I didn't for the sake of saving time).

 

image.thumb.jpeg.f93acb52494962d2a332c3beaf61de10.jpeg

 

This way is quite complicated, and also for special cases where the bow curve in front view is a segment of line inclined at a certain angle, as can be seen in the attached scan below. It is shown here rather for completeness, as for all above reasons this way was not suitable for my purposes. Furthermore, the resulting curve shape is not quite decent and at the same time not the easiest to modify.

 

The method as shown visually in Jean Boudriot's work:

 

image.thumb.jpeg.c77478bea3a7014047f09b8d01e38899.jpeg

 

 

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Have just read the paper on the reconstruction of the hull lines of Charles II's yacht. An exciting read, but I must also admit that I would have had a few comments and my interpretation of some important issues would have been different.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Waldemar
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Below are the pictures of La Néréïde's model kindly provided by Michele. Now its bow lines can be better appreciated, and it happily seems that they are as perfect as on the contemporary ships' plans, samples of which are shown above in this thread.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.735a3fd1a8a8050930a0a9a1743612bd.jpeg

 

 

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