Jump to content
EdT

Young America by EdT - FINISHED - extreme clipper 1853

Recommended Posts

There's a video series about handling a big square rigger using Sorlandet. Star of India at the maritime museum there also have some videos out. Fascinating stuff this handling of a big square rigger. There's a 10 minute video of James Craig's first 10 years since her restoration that has some awesome footage of her in plenty big seas. All are worth watching for those of us interested in the handling of big square riggers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 321 – Running Rigging Continued

 

Still working on the last 1%.  Since the last post in late March, the remaining yards on the mizzen have been installed with their rigging.  All yard braces had been left off up to that time because they are obstructive to working near the centerline and to reaching into the model to belay lines at the deck.  With the completion of the mizzen yards, work on the braces is now well advanced and other finishing-up work has begun.

 

The first two pictures show the model in its current state.

 

118122761_Ya32101.thumb.jpg.2b025a4f334df90e5fd547ab253e2d7a.jpg

324534795_YA32102.thumb.JPG.10a3538a87117250c2c9f4341e9d7b1d.JPG

 

Most of the upper braces have been installed.  Because there is still a lot of work to be done at deck level, the braces below the topgallant yards are either left hanging or not started.

 

The next picture shows the array of upper yard braces between the main and mizzen mast.

 

305219071_YA32103.JPG.bf33ddb91daae1ccde18a1be4ff2e184.JPG 

This area is quite congested because the mizzen braces run forward.  Fortunately there was no fouling of these lines.  I say fortunately, because there is little flexibility in running these lines.  The connections at the ends of the yard are, of course, fixed.  Lead blocks that direct them downward are also pretty well fixed.  Main mast braces need to be clear of mizzen sails at those points, as do their falls to the deck.  Also, brace lead blocks need to be roughly positioned at heights midway between the upper and lower positions of their yards, otherwise braces would have to be let go to raise or lower the yards, leaving them free to move about.  The next picture shows another view of the upper braces.

 

1436626312_YA32104.JPG.9b93d81799a521d2ff33be8bd96a4844.JPG 

Completion of work forward has progressed sufficiently to allow the sheets and tacks on the lower fore yard to be permanently belayed, as may be seen in the next photo.

 

894194071_YA32105.JPG.e175b424e70a1dcfe9b45c3b31354afe.JPG 

The three lines are shackled together with the clew garnets in the absence of sails.  The tacks run forward to cleats on the catheads, the sheets run aft outside the shrouds, through the hull to belay on cleats on deck.  The lazy tacks are belayed on the first pin of the main pin rails at the side.  These lines were used to control the clew of the sail while shifting the load from sheets to tacks or vice versa, especially if disconnecting one or the other.

 

This picture and the last two also show that the masking tape used to keep debris out of the hull has been removed, contributing greatly to the overall appearance.  This came up rather easily, requiring adhesive clean-up in just a few spots.

 

The next picture shows the focal point of most of the current work - installing rope coils over the belayed lines.  This is fairly tedious work – making the coils, allowing the glue on them to set, then placing them over the pins and adjusting them to hang with some degree of realism.  As may be seen, the pin rails are tightly packed.  So much for all that careful turning of pin shapes.

 

10220178_YA32106.JPG.36c054bb5a6da490c489d42ba468b473.JPG 

The last picture shows the really tight spacing on the poop pin rails.

 

614472891_YA32107.JPG.8cbbf376b76838999fcdd9d07f543f62.JPG

 

As mentioned in early posts, these rails were one of a number of possible solutions for belaying the many mizzen lines.  Even with the closely packed pins on this rail and the one just forward of the poop break, several lines have to be cleated on the deck.

 

The next post will continue with work on the braces for the lower three yards on each mast, and the interesting problem of routing those on the main mast to acceptable points aft without fouling the crojack rigging.  Stay tuned.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stunning model Ed; the rigging brings her to life.  

 

In 'Victoria' some lines/tackles were also led to eyes (Lang's eyeplates) in the channels - still trying to sort through that one though :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, everyone.

 

Thanks, Druxey, for the comment on that photo.  With that picture I was trying to get the view of the ship shown in the photo taken in San Francisco in the 1860's.  Almost got it, but the confines of the workshop and bench height make it difficult.  Soon I hope to get it off the bench and into a better setting for  whole-ship photos.

 

Pat, there are a number of lines on the model that hook to eyebolts on the channels, specifically the standing legs and tackles on the halyards, also tackle blocks on the fore yard braces.  I will discuss the braces for the main double topsail yards and their disagreements with the crojack rigging in the next post.  This kept me awake for a couple nights.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your work is an inspiration for those of us who have little patience for rigging. 

22 hours ago, EdT said:

The three lines are shackled together with the clew garnets in the absence of sails. 

When in port if the sails were unbent would these lines have been handled in a similar manner? There's always the guestion of how to handle the running rigging when sails are not included on the model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, again for the comments and questions.

 

Maury, yours is easier so I will answer that first.  The answer is: I have no idea.  A  ome will have to be found for this at some point - a problem for later.

 

Greg, I believe an entire book could be written about what to do with rigging when there are no sails to attach lines to.  Writing such a book would require much more knowledge than I possess.  The question arises on virtually every running rigging line on a model without sails.  Exhaustive examination of as many old photos as I could find, has yielded little in the way of common practice - or attention to any order.  I believe much depended on preferences and am not convinced that modern practice is representative of past practice.   Also, we need to consider that a big clipper like YA carried a crew of only about 50 (compared to ~800 on a 1st rate or ~300 on a frigate - both with half the sails) - not a lot of manpower to devote to appearance in port.    It seems that very much of the modeling is left to our own devices.

 

The specific lines you reference, lower sheets, tacks, clew garnets, and lazy tacks, in my opinion, are the most easily resolved.  Since these lines are shackled together to the clew irons on the lower sails, keeping them attached when the sail is unshackled is not too much of a stretch to the imagination.  The no-sails configuration to model is another question.  I have seen pictures where they are hauled up to the yard by the clew garnets and the sheets left hanging to the deck.  Hauling down on the tacks/sheets is also logical, since they may be easily accessed on deck when bending the sail.  Pictures of ships in port are usually not portraits of neatness and order that we would like to see on a model.  My solution for these is to hold the shackle some distance above the deck and secure all the lines neatly.  This is also a convenient way to add downward tension on the model yard.

 

I handle upper yard clews and sheets in the same manner and for the same purpose.

 

In general, I have tried to adopt configurations that leave unattached ends in positions convenient to their eventual use, for example staysail and jib downhauls and halyards tied off together at the base of their stays, bunt and leech-lines stopped at their yard blocks (although these have to be overhauled to the deck to bend lower sails)  reef tackle blocks tied off to jackstays, jib and staysail sheets omitted or coiled on deck, bowline bridles tied off to jackstays.  I have omitted studdingsail rigging completely except for blocks that I believe would have been permanently attached.

 

I am sure there are many other variations adopted on models - the most frequent seems to be the omission of many lines.

 

Ed

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ed,

I'm always excited when I look at your report.
This is model building at the highest level.
Your model exudes a fascination that is unique and fantastic.
Thanks also for the fact that you report so much about the detailed work. I have been able to learn from this and can also learn a lot in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, erik - for your comments and for posting the Sorlandet clip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 322 – Running Rigging Home Stretch

 

After almost 6 years living and breathing Young America, I can finally see the end in sight.  Another day or two should see the last lines run and, thankfully, the last rope coils hung.  From there it is just a matter of tidying up. 

 

Rigging the yard braces has been interesting and enjoyable work.  The first picture shows the bracing of the lower three yards on the foremast completed.

 

1988916060_YA32201.jpg.533a9a37f79fa45d480ba2268eee6953.jpg

 Braces for the double topsail sails and the fore course were added once there was no further need to get my hands in the space over the cabin – at least that is what I thought.  Braces were installed working from top to bottom to keep the lower deck area open – the opposite sequence to all other yard rigging.  The falls for these braces run through lead blocks on the main rail amidships as shown in the next picture. 

 

1038192899_YA32202.jpg.a4dda53300dc3c7dff067472b2d31816.jpg 

The lines are then belayed on the main rail.  This opening in the main rail, that replaced the original small entryway, was probably added a year or so after launch when the double topsails were adopted.  The entryway was moved aft.

 

Aft of the mainmast things begin to get more interesting.  The next picture may be a clue.

 

1682987328_YA32203.jpg.dfa720d5fce19147da2239eeebab6e5e.jpg 

Upper main braces run aft to lead blocks on the mizzen, while all the mizzen braces run forward to the mainmast before descending to the deck.  This is a bit of an access nightmare.  The next picture shows the area behind the main masthead where the mizzen topsail braces converge, the uppers to pendants shackled to eyebolts in the cap, the lowers to eyebolts and blocks under the top.

 

926164723_YA32204.jpg.50117b8bd7e9c4d235f15a3a15f48900.jpg 

Unfortunately I had neglected to install the shackled eyebolts in the cap, so the cap and band had to be drilled and the shackled eyebolts inserted between all this rigging.  I hate to admit this.

 

The main upper and lower topsail braces presented an interesting problem that took me about a week to resolve.  These and the main braces run aft to blocks on the boomkin and thence to the poop deck.  This is pretty much standard clipper practice, and quite evident in the two YA photos.  These lines each consist of a yard pendant, a running part that runs from the throat of the mizzen topmast stay through the pendant block, the running end of this is seized to a single block.  The falls run through this block to lead blocks on the boomkin.  This arrangement is fairly straightforward, except that there is major interference between these lines and the lower mizzen braces that run forward from their yardarms to the main mast.  These would also interfere with the mizzen lower sail when set – a lesser problem.  Various arrangements were tested.  I finally settled on the solution Underhill describes in his book, which involves moving the mizzen lower braces inboard on the yard,  allowing the main topsail braces to run clear outboard of these. The relocated crojack braces may be seen in the next photo.

 

 1123650236_YA32205.jpg.e8ca902144734f6e7b1ca488f9c66329.jpg

The main topsail yards are in the upper right corner but the lines are hard to follow in this picture.  The next picture may help.

 

1726609251_YA32206.jpg.43b395ab82cba886f034b2925592b410.jpg 

The arrows U and L point to the blocks at the end of the brace running parts for the upper and lower yards respectively.  The arrow at the yard points to the relocated crojack brace block.  The eye for this has to be on top of the yard so the block will be over the jackstay where it will not interfere with the sail.  The arrow at the lower left points to the standing end of the lower brace fall where it is seized to #4 chainplate.  The upper fall is seized to chainplate #1 to the right.  The next picture shows the lead blocks for the two braces at the boomkin and their belaying cleats on deck.  The fall of the main brace will run through a third block at the outer end of the boomkin.

 

1966052291_YA32207.jpg.31e537c423b9f56e0c2c59bff56978b2.jpg 

The next picture shows the falls running to the boomkin blocks on the port side. 

 

892184729_YA32208.jpg.e0f95d31a0068aa34a3262681faa1d9d.jpg 

This solution is consistent with the photos of the ship and has some documentary support, so I am quite comfortable with it.  It leaves the issue of interference with a lower mizzen sail, but I suspect that could be tolerated or circumvented when that sail was used.

 

The last picture shows the cutter slung inboard on the davits, finally, after 3 years in a box. 

 

 101911599_YA32209.jpg.9a55506400d77c51ba73091a45b89b7e.jpg

The picture shows the next, and perhaps the last remaining rigging riddle: what to do with the crojack, sheets, tacks and lazy tacks.  In the picture the latter two are belayed under the boat, awaiting a more acceptable solution for these idled lines.  Next time for that – and for the main yard braces that are still left off for access.  Then tidying up.

 

 

Ed

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geez, Ed, has it really been six years? Is it just me or does time seem to speed up as you get older!?

 

It's been a wonderful log, full of innovative techniques and building excellence. Many of us have dreamed of taking on a clipper ship but few have the talent, skill and patience required for such a complex project. Bravo!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I. too, was surprised at the fact six years have passed by since you began, Ed. Amazing and spectacular work!

 

As a footnote, mizen yard braces were taken inboard on the yard to clear other lines on 18th century ship-rigged vessels, so this was well established practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a wonderful journey you have taken us on Ed; I have enjoyed every step of your progress, learning quite a lot as I tagged along.  Your willingness to share your experiences and techniques is much appreciated.

 

YA has turned out as another exemplar of what can be achieved in a ship model, especially at the scale of 1:72. 

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another learning curve for us. Thanks Ed.

 

Mmm, wonder what the next build will be.

 

Whatever you decide on it will be worthwhile to follow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone.  Its been great having your comments and support throughout the project and for earlier work as well.  Its one of the best parts of this community.

 

Time flies when you are having fun, Greg, but you are right. It goes fast.

 

Druxey, thanks for the input on mizzen braces.  Its really so obvious a solution, but like so many good solutions, it needs documentation for authenticity.  I never gave this issue a thought until actually running the lines,  Then panic, then Underhill to the rescue.  May be there in other sources, but haven't found it yet.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two earlier sources are Steel, Rigging and Seamanship, 1794, Volume I, p. 207 ("Brace-pendents are stopt to the yard four feet within the cleats at the yard-arm") and Lever, A Young Sea Officer's Sheet Anchor, 1808, 1853, p.37, figure 242 ("As the Braces lead across (see page 49) the Bight of the Pendent close to the Block, is seized down to the Yard at (d), by which means they lead much clearer. Instead of the Pendent, some have an iron Strap around the Yard with a Block at (g).")

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful work Ed...Interesting solution to the lower mizzen braces.  I discovered a while ago that I too will be facing this dilemma with my Great Republic...even more so, because I have no space to fudge, since I have sails that will definitely be in the way of many braces.  Ingenious disguising will have to prevail.  I have fully enjoyed your log and have gleaned much.

Not sure you caught this, but it appears the aft backstay may have slipped out of its place on the main mast.  The image you posted of the main mast braces definitely shows the aft port backstay out of its station.

 

Thanks for the wonderful way you presented this build.....Clippers being my love...you kept me enthralled.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Druxey.  I do not have that Steel reference and did not think to look in Lever, but there it is.  This is how we learn.

 

Rob, you will have to do some research to find a solution to the topsail brace/sail interference.  I will be interested in the solution.  Apparently crojack sails were not used until the 1840's and then only in certain conditions - like long spells with the wind directly aft.  Good luck.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, EdT said:

Rob, you will have to do some research to find a solution to the topsail brace/sail interference.  I will be interested in the solution.  Apparently crojack sails were not used until the 1840's and then only in certain conditions - like long spells with the wind directly aft.  Good luck.

Right.  This is my first full set of sails implemented,...until now, Running the braces never extended me this problem.  Your solution for the crojack yard braces works, even thought the fulcrum angle is not overly taxed.  These clippers (GR, YA) were build in the same year and it can be safely assumed the solution was universal.  Paintings do not replicate this epiphanous revelation.  2 dimensional images can easily mask 3 dimensional issues. 

 

I will surely make known my resolution for the brace issue...when I can return to the shipyard in full health.

Thanks for the fine comments and observations.

 

Rob 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...