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Young America by EdT - FINISHED - extreme clipper 1853

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Posted (edited)

Two earlier sources are Steel, Rigging and Seamanship, 1794, Volume I, p. 207 ("Brace-pendents are stopt to the yard four feet within the cleats at the yard-arm") and Lever, A Young Sea Officer's Sheet Anchor, 1808, 1853, p.37, figure 242 ("As the Braces lead across (see page 49) the Bight of the Pendent close to the Block, is seized down to the Yard at (d), by which means they lead much clearer. Instead of the Pendent, some have an iron Strap around the Yard with a Block at (g).")

Edited by druxey

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Posted (edited)

Wonderful work Ed...Interesting solution to the lower mizzen braces.  I discovered a while ago that I too will be facing this dilemma with my Great Republic...even more so, because I have no space to fudge, since I have sails that will definitely be in the way of many braces.  Ingenious disguising will have to prevail.  I have fully enjoyed your log and have gleaned much.

Not sure you caught this, but it appears the aft backstay may have slipped out of its place on the main mast.  The image you posted of the main mast braces definitely shows the aft port backstay out of its station.

 

Thanks for the wonderful way you presented this build.....Clippers being my love...you kept me enthralled.

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

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Thanks, Druxey.  I do not have that Steel reference and did not think to look in Lever, but there it is.  This is how we learn.

 

Rob, you will have to do some research to find a solution to the topsail brace/sail interference.  I will be interested in the solution.  Apparently crojack sails were not used until the 1840's and then only in certain conditions - like long spells with the wind directly aft.  Good luck.

 

Ed

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, EdT said:

Rob, you will have to do some research to find a solution to the topsail brace/sail interference.  I will be interested in the solution.  Apparently crojack sails were not used until the 1840's and then only in certain conditions - like long spells with the wind directly aft.  Good luck.

Right.  This is my first full set of sails implemented,...until now, Running the braces never extended me this problem.  Your solution for the crojack yard braces works, even thought the fulcrum angle is not overly taxed.  These clippers (GR, YA) were build in the same year and it can be safely assumed the solution was universal.  Paintings do not replicate this epiphanous revelation.  2 dimensional images can easily mask 3 dimensional issues. 

 

I will surely make known my resolution for the brace issue...when I can return to the shipyard in full health.

Thanks for the fine comments and observations.

 

Rob 

Edited by rwiederrich

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Druxey, I noticed this morning that on my Victory model I located the crojack brace pendants well in from the yardarm - likely based on the rigging notes in Longridge.  How soon we forget things.  Completely forgotten and the early sources completely overlooked in solving the YA dilemma.

 

Ed

 

 

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 323 – Wrapping Up

 

Finally, 99.999% means complete.  Since the last post it has been a lot of little chores: snipping rope ends, the last few rope coils, touching up with paint, waxing standing rigging lines, clean up, etc.  Some of the "major" chores are described below.

 

The first picture shows the final disposition of the crojack sheets and tacks.  These were simply allowed to hang free from the clue garnet blocks with their full lengths coiled on deck.  They were tied down to one of the beams under the pile of rope coils to keep them vertical and straight..

 

153180898_YA32301.jpg.684b993a892b90d6d1959bbdae94c51a.jpg

 

The main braces could finally be run, since access was no longer needed to the deck area between the main and mizzen masts.  The next picture shows the starboard brace pendant shackled to the outer boomkin eye.

 

1159807444_YA32302.jpg.eb57f9432daebac710f7c83a54dd80ac.jpg

 

The fall of the brace runs from the yard pendant through the lead block on the rail in the center of the picture, then to a deck cleat.  The other blocks on the boomkin are the upper and lower main topsail braces.  Two missing eyebolts still need to be fitted on the rail. The picture also shows the completion of another chore left over from the volume II work, fitting chains to support the boomkins.  The next picture shows both of these.

 

810333574_YA32303.jpg.071612d41aed2d31a39bf4a27ddcf689.jpg

 

The next picture shows the starboard swinging boom, the lower studding sail boom,  being lashed to the fore channel brackets. 

 

465841593_YA32304.jpg.402bb147cb5214f902c0ec13944b8521.jpg 

The alternative would be to store these on the skid beams over the cabin, but this seemed more appropriate, since in port these were often used to moor ships' boats.

 

The next picture shows the model with the dust case removed in the relatively cleaned-up workshop.

 

1001544209_YA32305.jpg.50a18a388fc950609248cbf701656b25.jpg

 

Finally, launch.

 

1106728056_YA32307.thumb.jpg.b102993a007faa90a0f37360b836853e.jpg

Please excuse the amateur artwork.  Couldn't resist.

 

Ed

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Congratulations on the completion of this wonderful model.  This has been a totally enjoyable 6 year journey, and quite an educational experience for me.  Thank you so much for sharing it with us.

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Hi Ed,

 

I could have hit the like-button, but I wanted tot say that I enjoyed all your posts (even the ones were you said you were only showing repetitive work :)). The final result is absolutely fabulous.

And although the artwork is perhaps a bit amateurish, the point of view of the picture really shows the impressive height of the ship. Turn it into a black-white pic, and photoshop New York harbor in the background, and nobody can tell this is a model.

 

Jan

 

 

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Thank you Ed for allowing us to come on this journey with you.  This is a fantastic example of what is possible with our art/craft and this build log is priceless.

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Absolutely fantastic Ed.

 

Thank you for the masterclass in ship modelling. Like others, I can't believe it has been 6 years but it has never been onerous; indeed it has been a pleasure watching it all come together. Your expertise in all aspects of ship modelling has been a joy to follow. 

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Superb, Ed! Congratulations on completion of a magnificent model and a marathon rigging endeavour. This will be a very hard act to follow. Well done!

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Posted (edited)

Like the others have said, Ed, congratulations on a fantastic model. It has been a great pleasure following all your builds. Now I have to buy the books, even if I never try building it.

Edited by usedtosail

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I very much enjoyed the voyage, Ed. I don't see myself following in your footsteps,  though you were an excellent teacher, and quick with your responses to questions. A very beautiful build, and as druxey wrote, a marathon feat in rigging. I myself am still very much taken by your smithcraft.

Thanks for sharing

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Posted (edited)

A very enjoyable and educational voyage indeed. You are a very intelligent and skillful individual Ed to present this to all your followers. Thank you very much for your efforts and to all that submitted additional detail and knowledge. William Crothers and William Webb would surely be impressed with the results.

 

Scott

Edited by stm

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A true masterpiece, Ed. You have finally definitively answered the question, "What is 'museum quality'."

 

Thanks so much for so generously sharing your work on her with us.

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Keel to coils, superb!!!   You set the bar higher than most of us can reach, but it will be fun (and frustrating) trying to do just that!!  

Allan

 

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Your model belongs in the NMM or Science Museum in whatever interactive exhibit they have depicting the tea trade or clipper ship era. But I'm sure she'll find a great home somewhere.

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39 minutes ago, dvm27 said:

But I'm sure she'll find a great home somewhere.

I've got this really bare spot above my mantle...hint hint Ed.

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