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EdT

Young America by EdT - FINISHED - extreme clipper 1853

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My preference would be to have you post questions here on the build log so that others may benefit as well - and offer answers and comments as well.  I keep an eye on this daily.

 

Ed

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OK, for frame 1 pattern you show that the floor is sided at 14", then the 2nd futtock at sided at 13" and so forth. So I have the the thickness for each piece cut at that thickness. Now, when I go to glue each section down on the plan the varying thickness of forward and aft pieces they are not flat. Their is a gap between the aft and forward pieces because of the varying thicknesses. I would think that the aft and forward sections of the frames should lay flat on each other?

 

I'm I missing something? Or do I have this done correctly?

 

Thanks! Big time.

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Slackwater,

 

I believe the text is quite clear on this.  The futtocks should not be sided until after assembly if you are using this method. To quote from Ch 5:

 

Although frame components diminish in siding from bottom to top, all of the pieces should be cut from stock that is the thickness of the lowest parts, the floors or the lower futtocks.  This will allow the frames to lie directly on the pin board without spacers under the upper parts during assembly.  It will also provide an accurate basis for beveling. The sidings are smaller toward the ends of the hull, so check the List of Dimensions.  The upper futtocks will be cut back to their correct sidings after beveling and removal of the patterns. 

 

 

The initial toptimber sidings are an exception.  On the finished model, they will be prominently lined up along the main deck where any small difference in size will be very noticeable.  You will recall the quality criteria relating to uniformity of similar parts.  All of these toptimbers, two on the forward frame of each pair, should be cut out from 9” thick stock to ensure their identical width.  These will be attached after the other parts of the frame are assembled.

Ed

 

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Hi Ed,

 

I am getting ready to fabricate the stern cant frames. In the List of Dimensions, the middle futtock siding is listed as 11" while the drawings consistently list 12". I remember you saying to always follow the LoD but I just wanted to confirm: the stern cant frame middle futtock (as seen on the 'aft' drawings) are 11" siding, correct?

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

 

Randy

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I will take a look later this morning, Randy.  Stay tuned.

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Hi Randy,

Thank you for remembering that the List Of Dimensions takes priority.  I assume you are referring to the aft frames 43a, 44a, 45a, which indeed show 2nd futtocks at 12" in conflict with the LOD that specifies these at 11"  - a good example of why dimensions should be shown in only one place.  I probably could not resist putting sizes on the pattern sheets for clarity and ready reference.  A trap.  Because the LOD was created directly from my sources before making any drawings, using those dimensions is probably best - in this case and in general.  The difference on these pieces is slight ( 1" = .013") and I believe they will be planked over.  I cannot recall what I used, but would not be surprised to find it was the drawing dimension.

 

Thanks for raising this point.  Keeps me honest.

 

Ed

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Hi Ed,

After reading your three volumes, it seems clear to me that I will need a milling machine and lathe- both for this and future projects. I have no experience here and looking over my options, find this a bit intimidating. This leads to a couple questions:

[1] Looking around, I am leaning towards a Sherline 5400 series milling machine and 4400 series lathe. I know you like to avoid making specific recommendations, but are these appropriate choices for now and the future- or is it too much/little. Better yet, can you make any recommendations.

[2] As I said earlier, I am have not experience and am a little intimidated. I read one book on home milling machines but it still seemed a little abstract. Do you have any recommendations about a book and/or video that might serve as a useful introduction for someone with my limited skill set?

 

Thanks!

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10 hours ago, Randy Todd said:

Hi Ed,

After reading your three volumes, it seems clear to me that I will need a milling machine and lathe- both for this and future projects. I have no experience here and looking over my options, find this a bit intimidating. This leads to a couple questions:

[1] Looking around, I am leaning towards a Sherline 5400 series milling machine and 4400 series lathe. I know you like to avoid making specific recommendations, but are these appropriate choices for now and the future- or is it too much/little. Better yet, can you make any recommendations.

[2] As I said earlier, I am have not experience and am a little intimidated. I read one book on home milling machines but it still seemed a little abstract. Do you have any recommendations about a book and/or video that might serve as a useful introduction for someone with my limited skill set?

 

Thanks!

Might I suggest checking out this series on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/c/MiniMachining/playlists. There are complete videos of setting up and using Sherline mills and lathes. In addition check out the videos by Blondi Hacks https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7Jf7t6BL4e74O53dL6arSw. She's a wonderful teacher and has comprehensive videos on using the mill and lathe. Between those two you should be able to become comfortable with both. Above all remember that these tools are designed to machine metal and are not toys. They do a great job on wood but be sure to observe all safety operations and use eye protection. 

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Hi Randy,

 

I do not believe you can go wrong with the Sherline tools.  I have found them to be excellent, with an excellent array of additional accessories - all of high quality.  So I do not hesitate to recommend.  Greg's suggestion sounds like it would be very useful, though I have not seen the videos.  I also found the book, Tabletop Machining, by Joe Martin, the late owner of Sherline, to be very good and written for people like us.  The manuals that come with the tools are also very good.  In the Naiad and Young America books, I did my best to describe machining steps in some detail, recognizing that, like myself, most modelers are not trained machinists.  There is a learning curve.

 

As with all good tools, the Sherline machines plus the necessary accessories, will be costly.  I suggest buying them progressively, rather than all at once, adding accessories as they are needed.  I believe in YA Volume I, I discussed which would likely to be needed first for a model of that type.  You might want to have a look at that.

 

All the best,

 

Ed

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