Jump to content
Byrnes Saw Auction - See in Naut General Discussion ×
EdT

Young America by EdT - FINISHED - extreme clipper 1853

Recommended Posts

Hi Ed,

I follow this build of Yours for some time now ... breath taking staff ...

otherwise, I now designed kit for a full rigged ship (19th ct.), I have to say they are very similar, but my work will not be without planking, the frames will not be visiable ...

 

Zoran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, everyone.  I have been away on vacation for the past couple weeks and have not been keeping up with the postings.  Thanks for the recent comments. I hope to be back in the shop soon.

 

Bob, using the drawings pens for CA is interesting - perhaps a good use for these unused tools.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob,

 

YA was fitted with double topsail yards in 1854 about a year after her launch.  Based on the date and the two photographs, I believe that she had the Howes Patent type.  These were first adopted in 1853 and the Howes patent was granted in 1854.  The other type in use at that time was the Forbes rig, in which the yard was held by an iron fitting that slid up and down the lower mast head.  The Howes version, also using an iron fitting was bolted in a fixed position to the lower mast cap with a supporting strut to the lower mast head.  In both YA photos the yard is clearly fixed to the mast cap, so at this stage, that is my basis.

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for responding Ed. I suspected such.  My Glory was fitted with Howes as well...but the Great Republic which I am currently researching for a POB scratch model had Forbes rig.

 

Can't wait till you return with lots of new pics of progress......

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 166 – Bulwark Sheaves

 

Well. I finally got some time in the workshop for a couple hours today for the first work on the model in over a month.  Only a small task today – making and fitting the four bulwark sheaves that lead the fore and lower course sheets through the sides.  I toyed with fitting sheaves in the frames for these but the assemblies are quite small and after rigging, the sheaves will be completely hidden by the lines.  So I used the simple method of drilling holes, spaced at the sheave diameter into a strip of 8" x 8" stock as shown in the first picture.

 

post-570-0-48022400-1468603778.jpg

 

The sheaves were then carved into the strip.  The first step was to outline the sides of the sheave with a sharp knife as shown below.

 

post-570-0-19254500-1468603779.jpg

 

A small chisel was then used to give the sheaves a round shape.

 

post-570-0-85674500-1468603779.jpg

 

The strips were then cut into the 20" long sheave assemblies that would be mounted in the bulwarks.

 

In the next picture the position of one of the sheaves is being marked up from the base drawing station lines using a triangle..

 

post-570-0-38018600-1468603780.jpg

 

One end of each of the assemblies butts against one of the top timbers with its lower face laid on the planksheer.  In the picture one of two holes has been started within the outline of the sheave assembly.  These were then drilled through the planking.  The next picture shows a rectangular opening being filed out to fit the sheave assembly. 

 

post-570-0-87020200-1468603780.jpg

 

In the next picture the assembly has been glued in flush with the outside of the planking.

 

post-570-0-36392100-1468603781.jpg

 

After installing, these were painted black on the outside and white on the inside to match surrounding woodwork.

 

post-570-0-87679800-1468603781.jpg

 

A small task, but one of a few that remain to get the model ready for masts and rigging.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing Ed.  Have you or are you going to consult William Crothers book; *The Masting of American Merchant Sailing in the 1850"s*

 

Before or during your rigging of the YA?

 

It is a fascinating read and more then informative and instructional.  It has aided me greatly with my Great Republic research.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853

Part 166 – Bulwark Sheaves

 

Well. I finally got some time in the workshop for a couple hours today for the first work on the model in over a month.  Only a small task today – making and fitting the four bulwark sheaves that lead the fore and lower course sheets through the sides.  I toyed with fitting sheaves in the frames for these but the assemblies are quite small and after rigging, the sheaves will be completely hidden by the lines.  So I used the simple method of drilling holes, spaced at the sheave diameter into a strip of 8" x 8" stock as shown in the first picture.

 

attachicon.gifYA166 01.jpg

 

The sheaves were then carved into the strip.  The first step was to outline the sides of the sheave with a sharp knife as shown below.

 

attachicon.gifYA166 02.jpg

 

A small chisel was then used to give the sheaves a round shape.

 

attachicon.gifYA166 03.jpg

 

The strips were then cut into the 20" long sheave assemblies that would be mounted in the bulwarks.

 

In the next picture the position of one of the sheaves is being marked up from the base drawing station lines using a triangle..

 

attachicon.gifYA166 04.jpg

 

One end of each of the assemblies butts against one of the top timbers with its lower face laid on the planksheer.  In the picture one of two holes has been started within the outline of the sheave assembly.  These were then drilled through the planking.  The next picture shows a rectangular opening being filed out to fit the sheave assembly. 

 

attachicon.gifYA166 05.jpg

 

In the next picture the assembly has been glued in flush with the outside of the planking.

 

attachicon.gifYA166 06.jpg

 

After installing, these were painted black on the outside and white on the inside to match surrounding woodwork.

 

attachicon.gifYA166 07.jpg

 

A small task, but one of a few that remain to get the model ready for masts and rigging.

 

Ed

 

 

Beautiful work Ed,

 

your clipper build is a through and through sample of masterly model shipbuilding of the 19th century....

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, all.  Making those simple sheaves was a good way to get back to work - the real work - more belaying pins.

 

David, the file is a Grobet, medium cut, barrette.

 

Rob, I am lucky enough to have an autographed copy of the book and have almost memorized it, so I guess the answer is "yes."

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 167 – Helm Details

 

So, it has been a month since the last post – seems longer.  Not a lot of modeling being done this summer, mostly just odds and ends getting ready to start masts and rigging.  This week I made a replacement for the first wheel and added the bell to the rudder head enclosure.  First the wheel.

 

I wanted to make two improvements to the first wheel.  I wanted to add turned spokes to replace the simpler hand filed spokes on the first version shown in earlier posts.  I also wanted to downsize the section on the rim to make it lighter and less clunky than the first.  One of the turned spokes is shown in the first picture next to the belaying pin.  The picture shows the four sizes of spindle turned pieces on the model.  A different turning method was used for each.

 

post-570-0-78478400-1471274110.jpg

 

The largest is a turning of one of the 8" beam support pillars.  The rounds on these were turned with a shaped tool.  To its right is a 4" fife rail, turned with a single pointed tool.  At the far right is a 2" belaying pin, turned from a round brass rod using a hardened steel filing guide.  These are the smallest turnings so far.  There are 300 of them on the ship. The methods used for these three turnings were described briefly in earlier posts. 

 

The wheel spokes were turned using a simple filing guide and fine files as shown in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-42374400-1471274111.jpg

 

Because the 2½" spokes are so small and fragile I made the first set of European Boxwood.  The final set used in the wheel were turned from .032" cherry heartwood square strips.

 

Making the hub/rim was described earlier.  In the next picture the new wheel, with spokes installed, is being parted off in the lathe.

 

post-570-0-77919200-1471274111.jpg

 

The final cherry wheel is shown in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-24934800-1471274112.jpg

 

The bell is a simple brass turning drilled for the rod shown inserted below.

 

post-570-0-76484600-1471274112.jpg

 

The bracket for the bell started out as a rectangular brass section.  In the next picture it is being shaped and polished.

 

post-570-0-26097600-1471274113.jpg

 

The last picture shows the new wheel and bell mounted on the rudder head enclosure.

 

post-570-0-76539900-1471274113.jpg

 

The wheel was finished with a small amount of polyurethane, instead of the wax finish I normally use.  So far, none of the deck has been waxed because there are still many rigging attachments to be made.  The enclosure itself is only temporarily fitted on pins and will be stored away until much later.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 168 – Binnacle

 

"Odds and ends" seems to be the order of the day for the past month or so.  Not the best prescription for a lazy, hot summer.  Too easy to procrastinate.   Big consuming tasks are better.    On these little projects it is first research, then the drawing, then the modeling and photos – one step at a time.  The binnacle is one such piece.  A small part, but to judge by the mess left in the shop, one would think it had been the entireTitanic.

 

It started out as a cherry cylinder, turned to the ID of a brass tube from which two decorative rings were turned.  The next picture shows stage 1.

 

post-570-0-21988300-1471625862_thumb.jpg

 

The four-paned glazed top was next.  It too, was made from a section of the same tube with the glass mullions filed out on the end as shown in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-21268700-1471625863.jpg

 

The solid rod in the tube helps establish a constant depth and prevents the vise from squashing it.  The next larger size tube was used to make a ring to fit around the bottom of the top – shown below.

 

post-570-0-07395300-1471625864_thumb.jpg

 

Telescoping tube is very handy for making a variety of assemblies.  I try to keep a stock on hand.  The mullions were then bent to the center and the assembly silver soldered.  The parts at this stage are shown below.

 

post-570-0-05828600-1471625865.jpg

 

The cap was then sawed off the tube.  I did not want to leave the top without glass but making and fitting small panes like this is well beyond my ability, so I decided to make a small Plexiglas® prism to fit inside the brass top.  In the next picture a rod is being turned to the diameter of the wood cylinder.

 

post-570-0-59775300-1471625865.jpg

 

A four sided prism was filed at the end of this until it fit well in the brass top.  It was then polished using Micromesh® sticks, followed by buffing – shown below.

 

post-570-0-09280100-1471625866.jpg

 

The assembly was finally glued together using small droplets of thin CA.  The final piece is shown positioned on deck in the next picture.

 

 

 

I guess the two rudder pendant chains will be next.

 

Ed

post-570-0-29726600-1471626313.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, everybody, for the comments and likes.  I wish there were more progress these days, but as I said, things are a bit slow in the workshop this summer.

 

Maury, I do not expect to be making chain link by link, but over the past months chain has been on my mind.  There is a lot of it on the model.  Apart from the obvious anchor chain, lower yard ties, rudder pendants, bobstays, bowsprit sharouds and the like, there is a lot of smaller chain in the rigging, mainly the halliards and sheets for the topsails and above.  Some of this is quite small.  The actual sizes range from 10 to 92 links per fathom.  At 1:72 this converts nicely to 10 to 92 links per inch.  I have located and obtained copper/brass chain as small as about 35 links per inch but will be needing a solution for the smaller sizes.  Have some ideas and some test pieces to simulate the small sizes, but I would not call the problem solved yet.  If someone knows a source for chain smaller than 40 links per inch, I'd be interested.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...