Jump to content
EdT

Young America by EdT - FINISHED - extreme clipper 1853

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the responses, guys.

 

Druxey, the old guys did us a lot of favors.  However, with the advent of double topsails and higher masts on clippers, some topmasts could not be slanted enough under the top and did require scuttles - at least that is what I have read.  Also, of interest, is that the lower yard would have to be removed, although some trusses seem to have been designed to allow the topmast to slide through the yoke - but then the height and angle would be even more of a problem.  I am glad that the YA mast lengths (at least the originals that I am using) did not cause this problem.

 

Maury, the staves are permanent and, as I mentioned, are visible pretty clearly in the two photos of the ship.  I have not found much useful data on material or size however.  My guess would be wood.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 229 – Fore Topmast 2

 

The first stages in making the fore topmast were described in Part 226.  There are just a few details to be added in this part.  The first picture shows the lower sheave ready to be installed.

 

59a6b3c055355_YA22901.jpg.edcc2676298b4727fb6f5396799b32d8.jpg

 

All slots through the mast were cut with a 1/32" milling cutter, so in most cases some enlargement is required to accommodate other parts.  Slight enlargement of this sheave opening was done with the small diamond grit file in the picture to widen the slot to a scale 3".  The 2½" thick sheave with a diameter equal to the mast at its position was turned in brass on the lathe.  This sheave was used to raise the mast by means of a tackle hooked to the foremast cap.  The sheave is angled on the mast so the that rope will clear the close, square opening in the fore top.  The next picture shows the topmast fid.

 

59a6b3c0d0457_YA22902.jpg.d53d43446f2fedf9a272a3301ee93a9b.jpg

 

The dimensions of this substantial piece of iron may be seen in the photo.  The slot for this piece was also widened with a small file.  The next picture shows the lower end of the topmast temporarily in position.

 

59a6b3c150902_YA22903.jpg.481ca6823d0f3a886bbe96f62e55dfa3.jpg

 

In practice the topmast would be raised up through the opening in the top and through the cap from below.  The mast would then be fitted with the futtock band and the crosstrees.  On the model the topmast will be slipped through the cap only, then fitted with the upper details including futtock shrouds.  Then the whole assembly will be set in place from above.  Because the futtock band will not fit through the cap, it was installed after the cap was slipped over the mast.  The method for fixing the band is shown in the next picture.

 

59a6b3c1bcdb9_YA22904.jpg.45de3e98d3552224afb4b90cadfa0d6a.jpg

 

The band is placed below the hounds, which flare out to seat the crosstrees, so it cannot be pre-made and slipped over.  The tab shown in the picture was crimped to hold the band and also to simulate the bolted, clamping flange that would have been used.  Obviously this piece could not be soldered.  The band will be fixed to its position when the four futtock shroud eyebolts are added through holes drilled in the band and into the mast.  The completed band and eyebolts are shown in the next picture.

 

59a6b3c231699_YA22905.jpg.1107375c0b43e8ed917e79ce71a02ac4.jpg The picture also shows the sheave for the upper topsail halyard tie installed, as well as the seat at the top of the hounds for the crosstrees.  Those crosstrees will be described in the next part.

 

Work on these mast parts has been interspersed with "rattling down" of the lower shrouds.  The last picture shows this work completed on the starboard side of the fore mast.

 

59a6b3c2d0c12_YA22906.thumb.jpg.db3066a8419d3ba56a2cdd342ad6a8ab.jpg

 

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely work Ed. I am curious about the differences between the wood topmast and the drawing it is placed over. I am guessing that there is some leeway here since both are from your own hand.

 

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Micheal,

 

You have noticed another case of my taking pictures with discrepancies between the drawings and the work.  My apologies to all for these differences.  They occur when I elect not to print the latest revision for use in the shop - a very bad practice, but one I reluctantly sometimes adopt in the interest of saving 11 x 17 printer paper and ink.  Unlike the recipients of my final drawings, I am usually doing drawing revisions "just-in-time" for construction because before constructing something I usually go back and make sure my best current data is reflected on the drawings. In this case the dimensioned construction drawing for the spar had been updated and printed for use in making the spar correctly, but not the mast detail sheet which was still undergoing revision - mainly for upper mast details like rigging line numbers.  Snippets from the current detail drawing and spar construction are shown below.  You will note the difference from the first two drawings in the post above.  The square heeling has been shortened to correct size (2.5 X mast diameter) and the location of the fid hole updated based on the final drawing of the top.  The bottom of the hole is 1" + the depth of the trestle trees above the mast bottom.  These dimensions are shown on the spar construction drawings but not on the detail sheets.

 

Again sorry for this confusion.  I should be more careful or at least note when these differences occur.

 

Thanks, Micheal.  I like it when people look closely.

 

Ed  

 

59a7232233bca_14a1-72ForeMastDetails.jpg.70ac3d0c3f1b5f89d42b03db6168bdc4.jpg

59a729749cd2e_13b1-72TopmastConstruction.jpg.786a7a7dbca2cf1c6074123232526abe.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 230 – Fore Topmast Crosstrees

 

The topmast crosstrees are fairly simple structures – except for the iron spreader assembly that mounts fairleads for the backstays of the masts above.  In the first picture, the members of the wooden structure are shown fitted together but not yet trimmed to size.

 

59a952781ce65_YA23001.jpg.6830e7df04e7c5cac4f654ddcb3726ff.jpg

 

The four athwartship members are set into mortises in the fore-and-aft trestle trees.  The drawing (almost complete) shows the arrangement of the spreader irons.  In the next picture the wood structure has been assembled, drilled for the deadeye straps, and the arms tapered.

 

59a952788c86d_YA23002.jpg.40d185f8ba6796d85966375aeb5a8950.jpg

 

The next picture shows the assembly positioned on the topmast.

 

59a952790ba31_YA23003.jpg.6fda02789bbc91999501a875ba457c63.jpg

 

In the next picture, one of the spreader arms has been roughly shaped and the second has been drilled before shaping.

 

59a9527970554_YA23004.jpg.a8133f8ce02024a3cf047f7ea11c6bb6.jpg

 

The spreader structure was made from .020" hard copper plate for stiffness.  It will be very fragile nonetheless.  The assembly will be bolted to the crosstrees through the two forward holes (that do not yet appear on the drawing).  Holes drilled in the unshaped piece on the outer arm will help precisely locate the fairlead cleats.  The next picture shows some shaping of the cleats.

 

59a95279ddbc8_YA23005.jpg.fafabec2a5240e3d14b773fd98b969ee.jpg

 

Before filing the final shapes, the profile was cut out with a jeweler's saw.  In the next picture, a drawing scrap is being used to place the arms and cross piece for soldering.

 

59a9527a7f102_YA23006.jpg.49b5ac58a5bd21de2f18543739162603.jpg

 

After pinning, the paper was removed and the two joints soldered with minimal heat to limit the softening of the copper strips.  In the next picture the spreader assembly has been cleaned up and bolted to the crosstrees.

 

59a9527af4197_YA23007.jpg.0cf93919248697fe04791edc7cdfe229.jpg

 

The bolts are copper wire pushed through the holes and riveted.  The next picture shows the crosstrees assembly placed on the hounds.

 

59a9527b611e4_YA23008.jpg.2dc1c5ca79d0f3ac93959e289b1e0347.jpg

 

The last step was to add the eyebolts on the underside of the structure.

 

59a9527bc007e_YA23009.jpg.b7c52aa815cadfd41ae82902b63a0ce3.jpg

 

In this picture the assembly has been permanently attached to the topmast.  I am hopeful that the fragile spreader structure will gain some support after the stays are rigged through the fairlead cleats.Further work may now proceed on the detailing of the topmast head and fitting deadeyes the the assembly.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great smithing Ed, they look very good!  I sure hope there is enough strength in them at the tips/ends to sustain the pressure of the shrouds and preventers etc without them bending or will the cantilever action reduce this a little?

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed

 

Outstanding and delicate copper work.  I am very impressed by all of your copper work and these are no exception.  They are such thin, narrow details.  I appreciate your showing the 'blank' first step strip adjacent completed spreader bar component as I had wondered how you made the integrated cleats.  I have no doubt I would bend and damage those spreaders in less than a day.  

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all these comments and, of course, for the likes as well.  Your concerns for the fate of the flimsy spreaders at my often clumsy hands is well appreciated - and well justified!  They have already been straightened a few times.  

 

Druxey I may well try your suggestion once the topmast is secured.  Right now it is off for the rigging of the futtock shrouds, but will soon be in place permanently.

 

Pat, I share your concern, but only time will tell.  I am hoping that the stays will not be taken off their line too far and cause excessive inward pressure on the spreader.  We'll see.  I am somewhat confident that if the actual spreaders could handle it these should as well.  Wishful thinking, perhaps.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are welcome Ed, just caught up with your build. I don't comment, just watch and learn. I noticed that your ratline fastening method is also employed on the Chilean four-masted bark "Esmeralda and the US Coastguard "Eagle." Interesting but logical. Saw it and made a few pics when in Quebec City in July.

Okay, I'll make one comment - beautiful work!

 

Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Piet.  The method used for fastening ratlines is interesting.  Riggers faced the same problem we do as modelers trying to duplicate the method.  How long does each ratline rope have to be to come out at the right length after tying the intermediate clove hitches?  I solve the problem by making the last eye splice in place, but I doubt that would be done in actual practice.  It seems that there was a practice to account for over-length lines.  The last end would be wrapped a few turns around the outer shroud.  No comment on what to do with the short ones.  Use them further up, I guess.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 231 – Fore Topmast Crosstrees 2

 

After the last post, I explained the drawing revisions at the foot of the fore topmast, specifically the dimensioning of the square heeling.  The first picture shows this part of the mast positioned on the trestle trees of the fore top. 

 

59ad54519f07e_YA23101.jpg.241ae4d94102603bace8a27346a8231e.jpg

 

The bottom of the topmast is about 1" lower than the lower faces of the 18" deep trestle trees when the fid is down on the top faces.  The height of the sheave is not a critical dimension, but must be above the square section so the hoisting line will pass inside the square opening when the mast is raised.  One of the eyebolts on the underside of the cap would have been used to support the lifting tackle.

 

In the next picture the crosstrees have been permanently attached to the mast and the four deadeyes for the topgallant shrouds have been fitted but not yet blackened.

 

59ad54522f1b5_YA23102.jpg.b2219fe901e2351089590f5ce1a4a291.jpg

 

These 8" deadeyes will secure the 5" shrouds above and the same-sized topgallant futtock shrouds below.  The naming of these futtock shrouds that are installed as part of the topmast is a constant source of confusion to me, but I think I have finally cemented it into my mind.  In the next picture the deadeye straps have been blackened and the masthead has been fitted with its trim.

 

59ad5452a257e_YA23103.jpg.46b152c752cb6843aaff99a784b09a0d.jpg

 

The battens are very small and will be covered by the rigging collars.  The cleats on either side will support a bullseye for the main royal stay.  Before installing the topmast, the topgallant futtock shrouds were installed.  As with those under the top, these are hooked through the deadeye straps at the top and lashed to eyebolts in the futtock band at their feet.  I have attached some pictures showing the method I am using to form the eye splices in the served shrouds.  In the first picture a small hook has been formed and threaded with the served 5" line.

 

59ad54532380f_YA23104.jpg.451812561e14f2199a1a17610e3d3aab.jpg

 

The serving at the end is kept from unraveling with a drop of CA.  I am trying to limit the use of CA to non-permanent applications like this - except for the attachment of metal parts, like eyebolts, to wood.  The line was then seized at the throat of the splice with fine cotton thread with a tight overhand knot.  In the next picture darkened wood glue has been applied in the area of the splice.

 

59ad54539d106_YA23105.jpg.2000edd780c63602e400d59dcca0b8da.jpg

 

The glued area was first wetted to help the glue penetrate through the serving.  The glue joint was then clamped with the modified alligator clamp shown in the picture   The jaws of this clamp have been filled with epoxy sculpting material to form a round clamping hole shown between the jaws.  When the glue has dried the excess rope was cut from the joint with a sharp knife as shown in the next picture.

 

59ad54541d011_YA23106.jpg.616e00d4e9963e2d48b678a2cb702d1e.jpg

 

The cut is made to form the taper of the splice.  The purpose of the glue is only to hold the joint together to allow wrapping of serving down to the bottom of the splice.  The glued serving will hold the splice together.  The finished splice is shown in the next picture.

 

59ad54549071e_YA23107.jpg.db72d94bf8efee203cca5f50c550816f.jpg

 

Finishing with a smoothly tapered splice at this scale can be a challenge, but after glue is applied to seal the added serving, some crimping may be done to eliminate bumps.  Removing the excess serving without leaving short stubs is also a challenge.  This is done after the glue dries.

 

In the next picture the hook has been blackened and temporarily fitted to its strap so the length to the eye at the other end may be measured as shown in the picture.

 

59ad5455185ee_YA23108.jpg.ec7818ddc63396c0a7345989db95b5cc.jpg

 

An eye is formed at the lower end by the same method but without the hook.  The lashing of these lower ends will be described in the next part.

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making served eye-splices is a challenge that has bugged me for years, particularly in smaller scales. Looking at your method, I was wondering, whether one could not serve first a short length, then form a 'false' splice by stiching the loose end two times through the standing part, set the splice with lacquer or glue, and then continue to serve the standing part. This would result in a less bulky splice, as it would be served over only once.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wefalck, I am certainly open to suggestions to trim down the shape of the splice.  I have tried a number of different methods and have some others in mind.  The bumps on the splice are mainly the product of roughness in cutting back the short leg, serving over the previously served part, and knots in the rather large serving thread.  One approach might be to "plasticize" the area of the splice to fuse the rope and serving - well enough to allow this to be trimmed into the serving on the standing leg without having it unravel, then serve over this slimmed down, smooth part after the splice is glued.  I plan to try this on the next set.

 

The approach you describe is well worth a try.  There might be some measurement issues on the second end and there is also the issue of serving a short rope with eyes at both ends.  I like the idea of having the rope pre-served for these reasons and because it eliminates setups on the serving machine.  But still worth a try.

 

Frank, after filling the clip jaws with epoxy compound, a waxed pin can be used between the jaws to form the round.  Waxed paper between the jaws is necessary to prevent their bonding.  Alligator clips are inexpensive and can be modified to meet a variety of needs.  They are also light enough to use in rigging.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ed, very nice work and a great explanation of techniques as we have come to expect.  Maybe a silly question in that I have missed it, but how do you get the futtock deadeye lower eyes through the small trestles?  Are the holes drilled and squared large enough to accept the eye or do you expand the lower eye after threading through as a flattened piece?

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pat,

 

The holes are drilled to just pass the lower loop on the strap - with just a bit of enlarging with a small tapered reamer if necessary to push them through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ed,  a very nice clean job you have done of that, hence my question.  I have also just noticed the material you have used in the vice for holding the mast to minimise any marking and movement.  Will need to find something similar.

 

Thanks again for all the feedback and ideas :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 232 – Fore Topmast Crosstrees 3

 

The first picture shows one of the fore topgallant futtock shrouds being lashed to the band below the fore topmast crosstrees. 

 

59b28364c7aa7_YA23201.jpg.c61d88f76537f4883f4c76594dd618bd.jpg

 

Although they are fitted to the topmast, these shrouds are part of the topgallant shrouds above – hence the somewhat confusing naming.  Each lashing is first tied to the eye, then passed through the eyebolt and eye three times, and then wrapped around itself in the center with a series of clove hitches.  The clove hitches are an effective way to do this on these small lashings – and easier than wrapping a lot of turns while trying to keep the lashing from rotating while still making the turns tight.  The difference is virtually undetectable on these small black lashings.  The next picture shows the four futtock shrouds lashed in place.

 

59b2836560efe_YA23202.jpg.9763c53314f5b1085c8518af15c924b2.jpg

 

 

With these installed the topmast may be permanently fitted.  The next picture shows the lower end of the installed mast.

 

59b2836609395_YA23203.jpg.85c877d9670a41f57e9bff582f4dccdd.jpg

 

The mast fid is down on the iron plates and a filler piece has been fitted at the forward face to fix the bottom and keep the mast aligned.  Although not strictly necessary, the mast was glued at this point and at the cap.

 

The first piece of rigging to go over the mast is the fish tackle pendant.  This long pendant was used to suspend the triple purchase tackle that was used to lift and handle the anchors.  The pendant is therefore a heavy 8" rope.  It is served around the seized masthead collar.  The lower end has an eye splice with a thimble at its foot

 

59b28366893bf_YA23204.jpg.d198aa3c9af6d84d925b52d4ebf0f5d9.jpg

 

 The large upper block of the tackle will be hooked through this thimble.  In the picture the pendant is temporarily held taught by some black thread.

 

After the fish tackle, the topmast shrouds are put over the masthead.  In the next picture the shrouds have been placed and held at the foretop with clamps.

 

 

59b2836710435_YA23205.jpg.478e29b1f50612cf12b8b3a24d53f4d0.jpg

As with the lower shrouds the forward shrouds are fully served.  Serving on the others extends around the mast to just below the futtock shrouds.  The two forward shrouds are a single line that loops over the mast and is seized below the bolsters.  The aft shrouds are single, with a single eye splice served down to the futtock shrouds.  All these collars and eyes are parceled down to the seizings.  The next picture shows a closer view of this.

 

59b283678cd41_YA23206.jpg.0f7a77560c8566369316ee7a668c98e5.jpg

 

Next to go over are the topmast backstays, a pair on each side.  The collars of these are also served and parceled down to the collar seizings.  They are clamped at the channels in the next picture.

 

59b283681f5a3_YA23207.jpg.98a0b55c948312cbb61192f32befbe75.jpg

 

These are large 10½" lines, a looped pair on each side.  The last picture shows the parceling of these before the parceling is "tarred" with black artist's acrylic paint.

 

59b2836893a12_YA23208.jpg.9f29f10f65b73bb2f48e7193e3e9f989.jpg

 

They were removed for this painting after tying the seizings.  With all these lines secured at the top, the next step is to fix them to their deadeyes at the lower ends.

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,I have to say,this project is one of the most impressive things I have ever seen.I spent 35 years as a mining geologist working in a very complex mining project at depths some times exceeding 2200 feet.I  have also built a full scale experimental aircraft with a 36 foot wingspan,and have been involved in several others,so I know skill,imagination,and creative thinking when I see it.This work is astounding.There is one thing I would suggest.I have been contemplating that fid.At 6x4x54 inches that is .75 cubic feet of presumably wrought iron which is going to weigh 365 lbs.or thereabout,given a specific gravity of 7.6 - 7.9 for wrought iron.It strikes me that that thing is going to be mean to handle in the narrow,and precarious space at the front end of that top without some way to get a purchase on it to support the weight until it can be slipped through the fid hole in the topmast.How do you suppose those old timers went about it?                Of all the things man has created throughout history,nothing can rival the picture of a clipper ship in Flying Fish weather with all the kites out for sheer beauty in my opinion,for what it's worth.This project gives us a good view of just how they accomplished one of their creations.A grand piece of work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...