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Young America by EdT - FINISHED - extreme clipper 1853

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Merry Christmas and Happy new year, Ed. Found this log about 4 months ago and I've been following since. You work is amazing. Plus your knack for explaining processes is second to none. I'm extremely grateful you take the time to explain and write this log. I'm relatively new to the hobby and I've learned more here in this log than I ever dreamed possible. Not to mention the inspiration. You have set the gold standard. Thanks!! 

 

 

Rich   

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 260 – Clew Garnets, Tacks, Lazy Tacks

 

Clew garnets were used to pull the lower corners of the sail up to the bunt when furling.  Blocks for these lines were shackled together with the sheet blocks, tacks and lazy sheet/tacks.  These shackles were attached to iron clue rings or cringles on the sail.  For these lower sails, this was done on deck before the sail package was hauled aloft.  On the no-sails model the sheets, tacks and lazy tacks are suspended from the clew garnets.  The sheets will be added later.

 

Sheets were used to restrain the clews of the sail, the tacks to haul it forward when braced, and the lazy tacks to help control the sail when shifting from sheets to tacks.  On the model these lines are tensioned in a way that will position the shackled blocks and eventually allow the sheets to drape gracefully.  The first picture shows these lines rigged.

 

5a4a8f9bd9bd9_YA26001.jpg.2450edd8eb164a045e8383e0cca84794.jpg

 

The clew garnets are shackled to an eye under the yard.  The line then passes through block on the shackle, back through the forward sheave of the double quarter block hooked under the yard, then down to the fife rail.  The lines that go directly down from the shackle to the pin rail are the 4" lazy tacks.  These would be belayed at any convenient location.  The line slanting forward to its cleat on the cathead is the 5" tack.  Both these lines had their eyes at the shackle formed in place.  The tail of one has not yet been clipped off in this picture.  The next picture shows a close-up of the shackle on the starboard side.

 

5a4a8f9c57fa0_YA26002.jpg.cdda2133ae754609c77858309b8eb198.jpg

 

The larger, empty sheet block is to the left of the shackle. The next picture shows the fife rail with the clew garnet belayed on the first pin.

 

5a4a8f9cb78ab_YA26003.jpg.02b82288172711813f3eeca5bf7808e2.jpg

 

I finally decided to re-order the pins, moving the topping lift falls back to the third pin and the reef tackle fall to the second.  This avoids crossing lines.  The topsail sheet falls have also now been run through the outer sheaves on the sheet bitts and are temporarily belayed.  I may move these to the inner sheave.  The next picture shows the run of the tacks to the cathead cleats.

 

5a4a8f9d218a3_YA26004.jpg.c5b265d491777d20df75bbfb636cedce.jpg

 

And finally, the belaying of the lazy tack on the first pin of the main pin rail.

 

5a4a8f9d7de29_YA26005.jpg.c867c66f47b59a426676b2146b9cf138.jpg

 

The lines on pin 3, 4, and 5 are the two buntlines and the leechline.  

 

Ed      

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Thanks, everyone, for the comments and likes - most appreciated.  Not a lot to show these days - mostly splicing, tying and lashing ratlines.  Tedious work.

 

Ed

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Clue - or clew? Certainly current use this side of the Atlantic is the latter. But given the detective work you have done to get the rigging correct, perhaps clue is more appropriate! 

 

Amazing work. Loving it.

 

Greg

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Thanks for the help with my careless spelling, Greg.  Clew vs. Clue is right up there on my list with Sheer vs. sheer, bitts vs bits, etc.

 

Ed

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Or *Sheer v. sheer*...that one always trips me up.  Heehee.

 

Ed...Your work is a model for all who are serious about improving their own skill.

Happy new year!

 

Rob

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9 hours ago, rwiederrich said:

Ed...Your work is a model for all who are serious about improving their own skill.

Happy new year!

I think Rob has stated that very well - the style and tone of your books, and the quality of your build logs help us less capable modellers learn to do exactly that - even if there is an occasional typo :). 

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 261 – Fore Topsail Yards

 

I have finally been able to break out of the ratline work to start on the next set of yards – specifically the fore lower and upper topsail yards.  These will likely be the next two to go up, but the main yard is also an option.  I want to get all the ratline work done on the lower and upper masts before staring on the yards.  I got ahead of myself with the fore yard and that made finishing the ratlines a tougher job.

 

I described the methods I am using to make spars in Parts 217-218 and Parts 247-248, so I will not go through it all again.  I will mostly stick to some things that may not have been covered earlier.

 

I generally like to drill all the holes in a spar at the first trim.  At this stage it is sized but still square and not tapered, so it is easier to hold and center the piece.  I forgot to do this on the lower topsail yard so it had to be done later as shown in the first picture.

 

5a5d0bee0276c_YA26101.jpg.9839a734e53d066f39b0414cd7a789d4.jpg

 

In the picture the holes for the jackstay stanchions are being drilled.  The yard is clamped to the tooling plate at the octagonal center area and at the yardarm square section – not optimum but not too difficult.

 

In the next picture the upper topsail yard is set up for drilling while still at the first trim.

 

5a5d0bee8c224_YA26102.jpg.8cc6563f568491001951d7cb1316efea.jpg

 

In the earlier description of this drilling I used the mill vise, but since I had the tooling plate set up I decided to use it instead.  To make the yard parallel with the plate, I used the small depth gauge described back during the deck framing.  The next picture shows the jackstay stanchion holes drilled into this yard.

 

5a5d0befb0fa9_YA26103.jpg.b56df61412942d9de5a3b63b9089dc67.jpg

 

The stanchion holes are the most important to do at this stage because they need to be centered on top of the yard and equally spaced.  Other holes will be drilled later.  In the picture the quarters are marked out.  In the next picture dividers are being used to mark the diameters on two opposite sides at each quarter.

 

5a5d0bf034bdb_YA26104.jpg.04726443487bea8538892a3eada7c190.jpg

 

These are taken directly from the drawing and serve as guides for the first roughing out only.  The final dimensions at each quarter will be measured and adjusted more accurately as shown below.  In the next picture the two marked faces are being tapered using a plane with the yard clamped in a vise.

 

5a5d0bf0a35e0_YA26105.jpg.a27d1bcc9b1433282efb4ecd81f0f7ae.jpg

 

The vise works well before the spar is tapered.  The fixture described earlier and shown below could also be used.  The taper is planed, scraped, rasped and sanded down to the divider marks.  In the next picture calipers are being used to check and refine the sizing to the dimensions specified on the drawing.

 

5a5d0bf136172_YA26106.jpg.11dc0fbe8f20c795afb84b7fee32a3c9.jpg

 

The drawings specify the diameter at each quarter in full size decimal inches, which are then divided by 72 to get the measurements to the three significant digits used in the final sizing as shown above.  The sandpaper board is used for the final sizing. 

 

With the spar tapered on two sides, the planning fixture shown below was then used to taper the remaining two faces.

 

5a5d0bf1a6bff_YA26107.jpg.d753ba36ec70e8646985c2fb08cb2d1d.jpg

 

For these smaller spars the top section of the stop was removed to clear the plane.  In the next picture one of the remaining two sides are being tapered.

 

5a5d0bf22b0e6_YA26108.jpg.ab86d42736165acfc39d7f9733cf2ba7.jpg

 

The yard was then converted to an octagonal shape, except at the yard arms, as described in the earlier posts.  The center area on these "single-tree" spars were left octagonal, so the final rounding begins at the end of the octagonal section as shown below.

 

5a5d0bf2a105f_YA26109.jpg.1f97f0ba4b5a25b970e638895495a761.jpg

 

After filing off the corners of the octagon, the rounding was completed down to the square yardarm section using the sanding stick shown.

 

5a5d0bf31eab6_YA26110.jpg.5de2ed88982702834786f6feb4700f14.jpg

 

This has 220-grit paper on one side and 320-grit on the other.  The last picture shows the two topsail yards ready for their ironwork.

 

5a5d0bf39ee58_YA26111.jpg.d40106e72db3f3855e054279a48518e7.jpg 

 

Ed

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Clean and focused work as always !

 

I have been thinking of making a micro-depth gauge myself and would be interested to see your design solution. Do you remeber in which post no. you showed more details of it ? Very often I use the Vernier caliper for this, but something with less leverage would be useful.

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This is quite certainly the most important part of your build as most model builders, my self included, lack the expertise to properly rig a model especially one as complicated as YA. any additional work you do in documenting during this process will be most appreciated by all of us. Detail, detail, detail...... Thank you!

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Thanks, everyone.  Two weeks between posts seems like a long time.  It has been good to get back to some sawdust for a change.

 

Wefalck, I started looking through the posts for the height gauge but decided looking through the photo files would be easier, so here are two pictures.

 

_DSC5067.jpg.288d16f6cda8ddb1ae6837b716381dd4.jpg

_DSC5066.jpg.18cb687cda2111edb14e35cf9eeca2fc.jpg

 

It is a simple device made from some square telescoping brass tube.  The inner tube is 1/8".  The sliding outer section has a reinforcing strip soldered on one side to give more thread depth.  This side is tapped for a 4-40 knurled screw.  Square tabs are soldered on as shown at the ends.  The primary purpose for this was measuring the heights between beams so supporting pillars could be cut to size.  Works well for this and other simple tasks.

 

Hello, Guy.  Good to hear from you.  Thank you for your comments.  I hope that sharing the rigging work on YA will benefit builders of a variety of ships of the period.  I can definitely say that the rigging work and therefore the posts on rigging will not be lacking in detail - some quite excruciating I'm afraid. 

 

Thank you, Pat.  Not always as crisp as one would like, but I guess we are our worst critics.

 

Cheers,

 

Ed

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Ed, it looks a little difficult to tighten the thumb screw on your height gauge,  Perhaps if we lengthened the outside tube a bit it would allow for easier access to tightening the thumb screw.

 

I will be making one! soon. thanks Ed

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 262 – Fore Lower Topsail Yard Truss

 

When a double topsail (or double topgallant sail) arrangement was adopted, the lower yard position on the mast was fixed, and therefore this sail was not reefed.  Any reduction in overall topsail area was done by taking in the upper topsail.  Under the Howe patent, the arrangement most likely followed when Young America adopted double topsails in 1854, the lower yard was supported from the forward end of the lower mast cap by means of an iron truss that allowed the yard to rotate in two planes like the lower fore yard below.

 

The first picture shows the installed sling band with a double bracket that will fit over a shaft on the truss itself.

 

5a64a41bc7106_YA26201.jpg.6ebf9bdf118424c0bc28378ffe015ff9.jpg

 

The band is pinned through the yard and the underside drilled for the sheet block eyebolt.  The band is octagonal, made from .010" (about ¾" at 1:72) copper sheet.  The band was soldered first.  A U-shaped bracket was then formed from .015" copper, and drilled to accept the truss shaft.  Both parts are shown in the next picture.

 

5a64a41c3e887_YA26202.jpg.8ad82fa9c999a95218556c3643e19d37.jpg 

The u-shape was used to assure that the bracket holes would line up after assembly.  The joining top piece will be removed later.  The next picture shows the two pieces being set up for soldering.

 

5a64a41ca0048_YA26203.jpg.150afe968918742a4f331b9806c6199a.jpg

 

After soldering, the assembly was set up in the vise as shown below to file off the end of the U and shape the brackets as shown in the last photo below.

 

5a64a41d0f8df_YA26204.jpg.f7234cdc9262bfef0a364cf4deb7b365.jpg

 

The U was formed over a wood block that was kept in place when the bracket holes were drilled.  In the above picture a small piece of this block is inserted to allow the bracket to be clamped for filling.

 

The truss itself is shown in the next few pictures.  To start, two pieces of telescoping tube were soldered together then soldered to the top of a copper block that will be shaped to the truss configuration.  Using tube avoids drilling aligned holes and assured a match with the hole in the mast cap boss.  This initial assembly is being marked in the first picture.

 

5a64a41d7e7bd_YA26205.jpg.1c225c7080c248e9f6ee71ead2db9869.jpg 

The truss was then cut and filed to its overall shape shown in the next picture where it has been temporarily mounted to check fit.

 

5a64a41ddf8e8_YA26206.jpg.9e7447be3c13ff47d852b63b518203ba.jpg

 

In the next picture the truss shaft is being filed round..

 

5a64a41e50b9c_YA26207.jpg.0bbfadaecf0ba35021a5b8cb4b0f8e72.jpg 

In the picture the 5" shaft is being rounded from a sized square, to an octagon to a round – as was done in making the spars.  In the last picture, the full truss assembly is temporarily mounted with the yard.

 

5a64a41eb6093_YA26208.jpg.1a98a3aa1472c2afae9d5079e7c07d18.jpg

 

The forward end of the truss shaft will be fitted with a retaining cap and cut off.  This will be done later after the other yard ironwork is fitted.  All will then be blackened and the yard given some finish as was done before.

 

You may note in this picture that the ratline work on the topmast is still in progress.

 

Ed

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