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dvm27

Speedwell by dvm27 (Greg Herbert) - Ketch Rigged Sloop, 1752

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Greg,

 

How is it that I am just seeing this log for the first time...?!  There are so many good logs, its hard to focus at times.  That being said, marvelous work.  I love the toptimber details and the challenges they create.  My next ship was going to be Pegasus, but now it might be Speedwell...  That being said, I have a few years left on Naiad.  Again, I love the workmanship, not to mention the illustrations, overal presentation, subject matter and scale.

 

Best, Gary

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Here's a small update on Speedwell. Her main deck has been completely framed with beams, carlings, ledges hanging and lodging knees.That was rather routine but boring work which occupied me for a few months. As a change of pace I made most of the deck fittings but none are permanently affixed as yet. Currently, I am working on the capstan and have just finished the tapered barrel.

 

Just a tip for you novices regarding gratings. Ideally they should have full courses all around (see photos). It is easier to cut your gratings to the the size that accomplishes this first. Then build your coamings around them. If the result is a gratings assembly that is a hair larger or smaller than the plan so be it.

 

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The recent post on using a mill inspired me to post this report of my just-finished capstan. I used both the Sherline mill and lathe for the several steps required.

 

The square mortises for the capstan bars were added using a .079" milling bit and the rotary table. The top and bottom sections were milled to 1/2 of their 3 3/4" depth.

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Following the milling procedure the two halves were glued together.

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Once dry, the capstan drumhead was turned to it's final diameter on the lathe. The whelps were also milled  in one long strip and sliced off on the table saw. The mortises for the chocks were added on the table saw.

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The capstan barrel was turned on the lathe and separated just below the taper.  Each end was center drilled then drilled to receive a brass pin.The slots for the whelps were added with a .090" end mill on the rotary table at sixty degree intervals.

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The 3/4" bolt holes (#80 drill bit) for the capstan retaining bar pins and the cap piece were added with the drumhead again mounted in the rotary table.

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Further holes were drilled for the whelp bolts in the drumhead and the chocks are being fitted.

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The finished capstan (sans pawls).

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The carnage to my workshop bench for which I spent the evening tidying up.

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Apologize for the length of this post but I wanted to demonstrate how the fabrication of this complex piece could be accomplished by breaking it down to a series of small steps. For those without a mill or a lathe, I believe Chuck could easily make a kit of this by providing the drumhead in three slices. The rest would be straight forward with only shaping of the barrel (similar to Chuck's hexagonal pump) being required.

 

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Greg, I've heard a rumor that Chuck has a capstan in the planning stages.  Similar in construction to the windlass.  Can't wait.

Maury

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Lovely job on the capstan Greg.   It turned out great!   I have to say it's always nice to get a look at a fellow model builder's shop. ;-)

 

Tom

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Great presentation on what could be a fun project on its own.  I can see something in the lines of a 1/12 scale or larger for a nice desk display piece.

Beautiful work Greg

 

Allan

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It was pointed out to me by the ever-observant Druxey that the lower chocks of my capstan were incorrectly shaped. The should indeed be concave. I was misled by some contemporary sources. After a short alcohol soak and they were removed and replaced with the proper shaped chocks. Also, a photo of my now pristine workshop (after an entire evening of cleaning). My new mantra - replace tools right after using them....(at least for a day or so). 

 

Thanks for all the like. David Antscherl is doing his part for the publication of the Speedwell book. I just need to catch up

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Greg,

 

     I love the last photo showing the Speedwell sitting on your shop workbench.  In no subtle way we are reminded just how small a ship Speedwell was.  Even at 1:48 scale it is not a very big model.  All your previous pictures lead you believe it is larger.  This might be a great subject for those interested in constructing a 1:32 scale model.  When the book and plans are released it would be nice to have that scale available for purchase too. ;-)  Just something to consider.

 

Tom

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