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dvm27

Speedwell by dvm27 (Greg Herbert) - Ketch Rigged Sloop, 1752

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So what do you get PopPop on his 65th birthday when he already has everything he needs for his hobby? A paper on bulkhead model made from the pages of his own book. They even bought their own copy for the artist to make the model from the plans. If you look closely it has all the details of my model. Definitely one of the coolest gifts I've ever received!DSCN8078.thumb.JPG.23afd5790d75503503aecee29be35554.JPG

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Been awhile since my last update. Currently busy turning deadeyes and preparing for rigging. I had a form tool made for my by Sherline and it works beautifully for both the 10" and 7" deadeyes. Ideally I thought the form tool would part the finished deadeye precisely as both shoulders were formed but, in actual practice, the pressure resulted in the deadeye chain snapping off prematurely. I suspect this would not happen if the material was brass but wood just cannot handle the deflection. No problem though as I just shortened the parting portion of the form tool. Each deadeye was then parted off with a razor saw.  Drilling was also a breeze using the rotary table on my mill. No holding jig required - the jaws keeps them in perfect position (thanks for the tip Ed).

 

Later this month Speedwell heads up to Canada where David Antscherl will provide his carving magic. We have a detailed bill of carvings from the original so they should be very accurate.

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Hi Greg,

 

Fascinating, I did not know Sherline would make custom cutters.

 

So you chuck them in the three jaw chuck on the rotary table, and turn them 120 degrees? Clever!

 

Sorry I cannot join you in the carving workshop. Next time!

 

Mark

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Hi Greg - great looking deadeyes, and awesome cutter.  I spent a long time trying to grind one by hand, and still needed to do a lot of the rounding of the edges on the lathe.  

 

Not sure if you had the same experience as I did loading the deadeyes in the chuck for drilling. I found it was hard to do with one hand while I tightened the chuck with the other, and it was tedious to load it level.   I ended up standing a short dowel with lightly less diameter than the deadeye in the chuck.  It gave me a little platform to rest the deadeye on so I could  tighten the chuck with two hands, and made sure that the deadeye was always level for drilling.  Turned it into a few second process, which helped a lot given the number of deadeyes.

 

Dave

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Had some trouble loading at first Dave but then started loading deadeye with a curved hemostat (right hand) and tightening the chuck with the left hand. Only required finger pressure tightening to hold the deadeye in place. No bars required to tighten or loosen.

 

Mark, the form tool cost was only $35 and included one on each end. I imagine they could make form tools for the muzzle, reinforcements and ball of a cannon. They are cut on a wire EDM machine (whatever that is) and are incredibly precise.

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On ‎7‎/‎9‎/‎2017 at 7:07 PM, dvm27 said:

As many of my favorite modelers are posting updates this weekend I thought I'd share some recent progress on Speedwell. She is now sporting her copper cupola (say that three times quickly!) which arches over the steps to the "Great Cabin". I use that term in quotes because, after the lockers are installed, there is little room for the commanding Lieutenant. But this little vessel was designed for shore duty and was seldom used for sleeping. The cupola was shaped from a square of holly, hollowed out then spray painted with a hammered copper finish followed by matte varnish.

 

The rudderhead cover was also shaped from a holly plug which was then hollowed out. The panels were added to each side. Each one was a different dimension and all are hand fitted.

 

A little more work on the inside and outside of the hull and Speedwell, Volume I, will be off to the press!

 

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Very nice work, a true scale model.

 

Regarding the cupola, was it common for these to be copper, or specific to this particular class, do you know?

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I believe that, on many vessels of this size, where there were compound curved entryway covers over the companion to the not-so-great Great Cabin, these were of copper. The RMG model of Speedwell has such a copper hood. Lead would be too soft for this purpose.

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1 minute ago, druxey said:

I believe that, on many vessels of this size, where there were compound curved entryway covers over the companion to the not-so-great Great Cabin, these were of copper. The RMG model of Speedwell has such a copper hood. Lead would be too soft for this purpose.

Thank you, learnt something new!

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