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So Where Do You Do Yours Then (Model making That Is)

Where do you do yours then?  

590 members have voted

  1. 1. Where do you do yours then?

    • On the kitchen table.
      52
    • On the living room table.
      46
    • Other living area facility.
      165
    • In the basement.
      86
    • In the attic.
      16
    • In the garage.
      67
    • In a workshop.
      164
    • In the patio (yes, I've seen it before).
      8
    • Other...
      56


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5 hours ago, wefalck said:

Looking at these pictures, it makes me wonder what makes (adult) people piling up this amount of kits.

Humans are sentient beings with a free will so I would venture to guess there are numerous reasons why, but to some degree or another it has to do with stimulation of one or more of the five senses.

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1 hour ago, CDW said:

Humans are sentient beings with a free will so I would venture to guess there are numerous reasons why, but to some degree or another it has to do with stimulation of one or more of the five senses.

To me it sounds - or looks - more like the craving for ownership ... mine ... mine ... mine (I have a small stash to)

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18 minutes ago, cog said:

To me it sounds - or looks - more like the craving for ownership ... mine ... mine ... mine (I have a small stash to)

I buy, sell, and trade. I look for and find estates of deceased modelers, buy their collections for pennies on the dollar then resell for a profit.¬†ūüėź

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I started my stash while I was raising my first family and had no time for modeling. Then I added more when it became obvious that the kits were becoming hard to find and I was still having kid/space issues, (For building and displaying). 

 

Now I am on my third generation of kids, still have a limited building and display area but seem unable to quench the desire to build so still buy kits that interest me. I am not as smart as Craig and do not sell any of them, I give one away now and then but that is about all, so the storage has become so large that It is hard to even go in and pet them now and then.

 

I suspect I have gone past builder and collector and am presently entering into hoarder status. :(

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On 7/13/2019 at 1:30 AM, cog said:

To me it sounds - or looks - more like the craving for ownership ... mine ... mine ... mine (I have a small stash to)ÔĽŅ

¬†ūü§¶‚Äć‚ôāÔłŹ

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To Richmond from Darwin.

 

Great to see an old Grimsby Trawler on here - and docked in Australia too!

 

I always wanted to build this, but my Weathering techniques aren't good enough to do it justice (as in they are currently non-existant!!) and as you will see below, a trawler without any dents and rusts just isn't a trawler (and the one in the picture is in good nick too!!)

 

 

Samarian_GY445.jpg

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Thanks  John - I am struggling with the build (I have dropped it /knocked it over twice) and it is really a horrible kit and not an enjoyable build

 

I was just completing the rigging and knocked it over for the second time and bits come flying off everywhere - a testament to my poor gluing techniques or just the poor fitting and constructability of the model generally. I will ensure I will construct my own base on any future ship models - that way it will be more stable and probably easier to build.

 

I hope to have the finished model to show in a week or so. To tell you the truth I just want to get it finished and will forget the weathering and just put on the shelf. I think you can see it in the background of one of my work space photographs minus the top deck which is now sitting forlorn behind it!

 

I really do not recommend purchasing it.

 

Richmond.

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Hi all again!!

There has been a change since I posted my work space. No longer am I confined to the kitchen table and having to clear the decks after each bout of ship building.

I have been moved to the spare room (only the box room as the grandkids get the big room)20190804_200809.thumb.jpg.481ecd8a3fb5a030744a95adb28de886.jpgNow I have a dedicated space to work in.

20190804_200839.jpg

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Here is my workspace, it is on a second kitchen table between the official "dining room" and the living room, it's a very small house with an open living/dining/kitchen. I have enough wall space to just barely fit a 4' wide print/plan on the wall above and to the left of the table. Just beyond that space is where my son and I's guitars hang before running into the couch. I have a small workshop outside under my patio, walled off and attached to the side of the garage. It has a roof, but the roof is the patio roof, and the walls don't go all the way up. Not insulated, more like a storage shed for lawn tools. Nevertheless I turned it into a workshop.

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My initial outside workshop after I bought the house and built the workbenches. The white wood siding on the right is my garage and just out of the frame of the photo is a short doorway that goes into the garage. There is another separate patio entrance to this shop directly behind where I am taking the photo from.

 

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About a year or so after I moved in I wanted more space so I detached the wall on the left and moved it 4 feet further left and built extended the back and front walls to meet it, thus giving myself an extra 4 feet side to side.

 

1578534025_2016-04-2120_26_05.thumb.jpg.b819fd240bfc7897b87f7d2fef373ed7.jpg

 

From the doorway to the garage looking to the back new extension corner.

 

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From the doorway to the garage looking towards the front of the shop at the other entrance.

 

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I have since changed it up again to fit a full size floor lathe. No photo of this though. Instead of the two work benches forming an L shape in the back corner I was barely able to squeeze them both in lengthwise along the left wall with a bit of storage space in that front left corner like there is in the above photo. I then put the lathe along the back wall directly in front as you walk in from the patio. Most of my shop is dedicated to lathe work now. I have a small job site table saw, miter saw, scroll saw, and router table, but I keep them stored under the benches on the storage shelf and bring them out when needed. I am starting my second year as a high school wood shop and CAD drafting teacher so I have access to all kinds of full size wood working tools there.

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And here is my humble work space. It is situated in a room we constructed on the side of our log cabin up here in the hills of Virginia. The room used to be part of a wrap around porch. We closed it in and added a/c and electricity (among other things obviously). Just recently the Admiral decided I needed more work surface so she redesigned the shipyard a little and we installed a new full length counter top along the wall and a new cabinet for the wood etc. I now have LOTS of room to work in (compared to the small back room I was using when I first started) and the "hole in the wall" you see there goes through to the kitchen (it's actually where the old kitchen window used to look out onto the porch), so sustenance is not far away! When I am sitting working the Admiral has been known to pass me food and drink thru the "drive through" as we call it :)

 

20190818_163417.thumb.jpg.81827d5e0f922a2a05b9b9b9d7f32e37.jpg

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The most important thing is:, i find myself very well.

On the left is ( green) is orbital sander PTSG 140b2, company: parkside¬†ūüėÖ¬†shop: lidl.¬† Cordless drill is ryobi r18dd3. And the drill bits is dewalt.¬† Toolbox boox is chinese industry product buy in para-builidng market..

20190827_203304.jpg

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Our Scottish tour ended in Edinburgh and we stayed an extra day to visit the Royal Yacht Brittania  open as a museum ship nearby at Leith.

 

This turned out to be a highlight of our trip.  Readers of this post may have seen the Yacht at sea in the Netflix series The Crown that filmed an entire episode on board.

 

The Yacht is berthed alongside a modern shopping mall and the visit begins on the mall’s second floor where there is a small very good museum.  Visitors then proceed to a tower where gangways at five levels provide access to the yacht itself.  The top level includes the bridge and subsequent lower levels progesss through State spaces, passenger living spaces, and bedrooms.  The lowest level provides a view of the engine room, a conventional cross compounded geared steam turbine plant.  

 

The lowest level also includes a small museum covering the Royal Family‚Äôs interest in Yachting. ¬†Much has been written about the Queen‚Äôs interest in horses and ‚Äúcountry life‚ÄĚ but it turns out that Prince Phillip is an avid yachtsman. ¬†The Royal Couple owned and actively raced a yawl named Bloodhound during the 1960s and Bloodhound restored to sailing condition is moored immediately behind Britannia.

 

Of particular interest to me was Prince Phillip’s friendship with Uffa Fox.  While Uffa Fox may not be a household name, he is considered to be the father of the modern high performance sailing dinghy.  Prior to WWII he modified the lines of an International 14 sailing dinghy to produce a planing hull.  Uffa went on to design other successful boats and Prince Phillip owned one, a Flying 15 while serving in the Royal Navy.  The Prince’s Flying 15 is displayed on board Britannia along with a full complement of ships boats and ceremonial launches.  According to the museum, the Prince and Fox went on to become close friends.

 

The entire Yacht is furnished with artwork, pictures, and momentos, so one has a feeling that the Royal Family just departed.  This included a Yacht design book by Uffa Fox on Prince Phillip’s bedside table.  Highly recommended!

 

Roger

 

Oops!  Posted in the wrong thread.  Will someone who knows how please move it to Scotland Maritime museums thread

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Small update on my living room modelling corner, it evolved a bit over the recent years. It is a balance of utility against aesthetics, for example most of the storage space is elsewhere (in a storage cabinet in 5 meters from that corner).

Hidden under the table: vacuum, thickness planer, bandsaw, table saw, air compressor, mill, lathe, vise, box of scraps, lathe and mill tools and accessories. On the table top - disk sander, and assortiment of handtools is in the small wall mounted drawer. So everything you may need is there. Yes, getting machines out gets old pretty quick (though a lifting table makes it easier), but it is a price for aesthetics :)  

I guess my main message is that you can adapt a really small space (this table is just 120cm / 4 feet wide) to be a neat area, suitable for scratch building with all the necessary tools, while keeping it cosy and not creating an eyesore.

 

Main additions that I can recommend:

* Table with electrical height adjustment. The most used and convenient tool, can't recommend it enough.

* Inset vise in that table - allows you to mount model or some woodworking parts to the table without any ugly protruding parts. I use it every time to mount the model.

* Quiet household vacuum (hidden under the table) - more than enough for our applications, small and quiet comparing to "shop vacs". You really do not need a shop vac for modelling scale, even when doing thickness planing or sanding.

* Magnetic bars for most common tools, in general small magnets everywhere - helps with small blades and chisels that tend to fall and get lost otherwise.

* Small spot lights on a flexible shaft - moved every time. A bit of compensation for a lack of powerful overhead lighting. 

2001648223_Foto2019-03-09115330.thumb.jpg.0d81a04cbff92036c47c14f4b1ca57af.jpg

That's how it looks when in use :) 

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792817712_Foto2019-07-11200900.thumb.jpg.2fee000fa869679cab1438e085a8504b.jpg

 

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A room with a view ... You won't get cold feet whilst working on your model Mike. Quite a nice working area you have created for Daria ;)  and yourself

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5 hours ago, Mike Y said:

That's how it looks when in use :) 

What do you mean Mike? How could it be in use without Daria? 

 

I would love to have that view from my work space.

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   While our shower was being replaced upstairs, I was inspired to tweak my model shop a bit.  I had an old adjustable height desk chair on five swivel wheels that had the seat back broken off.  It looked like a good solid base for what would make a good solid movable support.

¬†¬†¬† I removed the seat and the remains of the seat back. ¬†Then some modifications to the steel seat base mechanism were necessary.¬† The base wasn‚Äôt level so I used some leftover metal shim wedges from the elevator installation to make it level and bolted it solidly in place with a 5/8‚ÄĚ machine bolt and nut with both flat and lock washers as shown below.

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¬†¬†¬† I was not able to remove the entire bracket from the seat back, so I just removed the hardware that was holding it in a position that kept me from leveling the top.¬† The seat base mechanism had four predrilled tabs so it was easy to lag screw two layers of ¬ĺ‚ÄĚ plywood to form a base for the new top.¬† The top itself was made with a 24‚ÄĚ square piece of 5/8‚ÄĚ laminate covered particle board that was screwed down with five 1 5/8‚ÄĚ square drive brass screws.¬† So, this leaves me with this mobile rotating adjustable height platform shown here.

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    Now I just needed to find a place for it.  I took a look at the roll around shelf unit sitting behind my main modeling table with the fan and heater on top.

100_5965.thumb.JPG.6ab909db6491eb8684978918f0bbe6e9.JPG   While the top of the shelving unit was the right height, the shelf below was hard to access without moving the modeling table out of the way.  As you can see here the height of my new rolling platform when at its highest position worked out just as well as the shelf unit, so I made the switch.

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    Looking now at the band saw area, the back left corner was basically a wasted area.  Having to run the power chord for the shop vac across the entryway to the rest of my shop to the outlet on the other wall was also just a bit inconvenient to say the least.

    First thing to do was to move the rolling shelf into that dead corner to use both for my band saw blade storage drawers below and when pulled out from the wall, an outfeed table for the band saw. 

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    The power outlet box (actually a timed outdoor power strip) was moved out of that dead corner and remounted right above the shop vac so no more power chord strung across the entryway.

100_5980.thumb.JPG.191d6a910cb4074e63de9f2470dd2e2c.JPG   That also makes it much easier to unplug the shop vac for use elsewhere when needed.  All of the power chords are loosely strung across some open hooks to allow the tools to be easily moved when needed.

 

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I have just started with ship modelling, but feel that is something I will continue doing, so I have arrange a building area. The only suitable place was under the stairs! Just like Harry Potter. The table isn't wide, just 80 cm. so it will limit the size of models to be built in this shipyard. But it's kind of cozy.  To the right (not shown) I have some drawers and shelves for tools and building material. No space for working on more than one (or possibly two) models in parallel though.

 

20200222_160826.jpg.39b228eb39eb4a21cfc398e1d9a85fd0.jpg

Cheers

 

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