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Kimberley

Jolly Roger Pirate Ship by Kimberley - FINISHED - Lindberg - PLASTIC - 1:130

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Kimberley: The Santa Maria is one of those kind of ships where the "weathering" technique really shines. Those old used and abused little ships have to be built to look really old, dirty and poorly maintained. But that's your choice, of course.

 

I will try to post some photos of my Heller's Santa Maria tomorrow, to give you an idea... :)

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Hello Kimerly,

 

I really like the manner in which you have laid out your model in sections. This reminds me as a mechanic working on Jet Engine Components overhauling items like waterpumps, fuel pumps, oil pumps, etc...I laid my parts out in the same manner but isn't it funny I failed to do the same with my model. Looks like I have to learn all over again. I believe your model will turn out brilliant and cannot wait to see the finished product. Best Wishes.

 

John

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Wow!  Ulises, as usual, your Santa Maria is awesome!  She is a beauty.  I really want to learn the knots. 

 

I learned something today.  If a part does not fit, you make it fit by cutting it down.  I am happy to report I got 2 of the masts together.  One more to go.  I am not kidding you, I have parts that are supposed to have holes for them to go into, and there are no holes.  I am just improvising.   The directions are very confusing on how and where things go.  Of course, I still need to learn more about ships themselves.  I have the utmost respect for anyone who has done a great job on this same ship.

 

Auvergne, I actually took each piece and put it in a baggie/ziploc and marked the bags with their numbers.  If that is what you are talking about.  It has made it very easy for me to find the pieces.  I had so many problems reading the part numbers on the trees, so that is how I came up with that idea.  Thankfully, I actually got about 95% of the parts marked correctly.  I paint them by holding them with a pair of tweezers.  Sometimes I can only do one side, and then after it dries I do the other side.  Right now I am just trying to finish this one.  I will post it when I am done, but you guys will see how badly I did on several sections of the ship.  I have learned a lot more doing this ship though.  

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Very good Kimberly! Sorry to ask but is this a plastic kit or wood? If it is plastic I can help you paint the intricate details at the stern and bow. It helps to use a Rapidiograph Ink filled pens. They are technical pen for drafting and a .25 would work great. Chose from a wide variety of colors of acrylic ink and dab on with the pen point. Very easy, very clean, and you receive a professional look if you take your n time.

 

Best wishes to you Kimberly!

Enjoy.

 

John E (Auvergne).

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gee........thanks for the head's up on some of the B.S. with this kit...........it will help emensely when I get to it.    sounds like you have a system all worked out for yourself....this is good.   do you have any pictures of your current progress?

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Kimberley: Here are some photos of my Santa maria. I hope you can find something useful in them. This is the Heller kit in 1/75

 

Ulises,

Did you do a base coat then several "washes" of differnent shades of browns and black?  Kimberly, this style of painting is a lot of fun.

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Auvergne this is a plastic kit.  This is my 2nd ship.  Thanks for the tip on the pens.  Can I find these in any hobby store?

 

Ulises, no I just did one coat of paint.  I will give your tip a try.

 

Here are some pictures.  I showed where I messed up on the back and front.  I am still having problems figuring out how to tie the rigging.  I just glue them on.  I do like how they do the sails on this one.  They have you sew them on the posts (?).  I don't know how you guys handle those really small parts with your hands and fingers.  I have pretty small hands, and it is hard for me.

 

 

 


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For the technical pens Kimberly...you can find them at any hobby or art store...Michaels, www.dickblick.com has them too. As I meentioned earlier a .25 or .35 will do nicely. BTW, you are doing great on your model...you are doing nbetter than I am on my Bireme...Good luck and happy modeling....

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Ulises,

Did you do a base coat then several "washes" of differnent shades of browns and black?  Kimberly, this style of painting is a lot of fun.

Hello. Please see this thread where I explain some things. Thank you.

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/3962-how-to-make-plastic-look-like-wood/#entry114022

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Perfect Auvegne.  I am going to Michaels tomorrow anyway.  I am looking for some yarn for a friend.  I will look for the pens.  I wrote down the info you gave me on them.  Thanks for your kind words about my model, but really it is not that good up close.

 

Spencer, I did paint the deck.  I painted it in browns.  Plus, a few things in red.  I did not paint the side rails.  This ship has been more of a learning and experimenting ship for me.  It really was not a well made kit, and the instructions are very confusing. 

 

I am so excited.  I just got my new Revell Santa Maria in the mail today.  I am going to really work hard on it.  I am going to finish up this one ship first.  I really just need to finish the sails on it.

 

Ulises thanks for the link to your posts about weathering.   

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Ahoy Kimberly :D

 

Just thought I would share a few plastic modeling tips.

 

Make sure you wash all the parts before you start the model. I would use one of those plastic storage containers and soak the trees in lukewarm soapy water, never hot as it may warp the parts. Give them a little love with an old toothbrush and a final rinse in cold water. This removes the release agent used by the manufacturer to get the trees out of the mold and makes painting much easier. The tub prevents you from loosing a part down the drain.

 

If you are not already, learn to use Tamiya Extra thin cement http://store.spruebrothers.com/product_p/tam87038xxx.htm

You just put the parts together, then touch a seam with the little brush/applicator which is in the cap. It is the bomb, especially for tiny parts

 

I know Hobby Lobby sells it, Michaels might too. Don't forget about the 40% off coupon either

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Thank you so much for reminding of the coupon!  So do I use the Tamiya extra thin cement to glue everything?  I have been using Model Master Liquid Cement for Plastic Models.  The one thing I love about this one is that is has a long thin stem that lets you put little dabs of glue in places, and it is great for hard to reach places.

 

I bought the Tamiya extra thin cement tonight.  Now I just need to learn exactly what I do with it.  Do I use it like the stuff I have been using?  Do I use it on all of the pieces?

 

I also got the Elmer's glue to work on the rigging.

 

Oh, and I can't find the colors they are asking for on my new Santa Maria in the Testor paints, such as olive brown, sandy yellow.  Does anyone have any tips?

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Ahoy Kimberly :D

 

For the glue

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXTK9KdRQN4

 

He doesn't mention this. Make sure your fingers are no where near the seam as the glue will run up between your fingers and the part, damaging the part. You can use it for just about everything. Practice on the sprues/trees in your kit. Less is more. It is worth the time to learn to use

 

As for the paint. See if you can match it to one of Testors colors. Tamiya also make hobby paint sold at Hobby Lobby so try them too. Olive brown is just a name. Always match the color, not the name when using another manufacturer .

 

http://www.testors.com/category/136648/Acrylic_Paints

 

http://www.tamiyausa.com/articles/ln/72/XF-chart-10ml.pdf

 

 

PS: Kevin is a very good modeler and has a log here

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/4011-bismarck-by-kevin-trumpeter-1200/?p=113788

 

It is a plastic kit and I am sure he would love to have you follow his build

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A little word on cements.  Be careful with the Testors, for it will attack or craze the plastic if put on too thick.  Tamiya is a better cement but can still craze the plastic if put on too thick. 

 

Plastic Strut, WeldX, or Weld On are brush on liquid cements that do not harm the plastic.  I think Micheals and Hobby Lobby carry it.

 

I also prefer to use Lock Tite Gel superglue for applications that require a semifast and strong bond.

 

For knots, I use "Head Cement" that is used to secure thread for Fly tying.  It is easy to use, dries clear and thin, and is indestructable.

I attached pictures of both my Jolly Roger and Revell Santa Maria.  The Santa Maria was built in my dorm while working up in Glacier Park using tempra paint, a red marker, and a pencile for coloring and detail.

 

post-3680-0-44365700-1382641195_thumb.jpg

post-3680-0-79214300-1382641200_thumb.jpg

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Your ships look great Scott.  Bummer on the Jolly Roger you lost.  That is why I made sure my cats can not get near my first ship I did. 

 

Thank you for all the glue and paint tips.  I am going to play around with the Tamiya I already purchased on scrap pieces of plastic.  I did not realize there were so many different types of glues.

 

I am getting better at the knots.  I still cheat on some of them and just glue them in place on the first tie.

 

I will look at the other brands of paint.  I saw a paint yesterday called Hummel.  What do you guys think about acrylic verses enamel paints?  I was quite irritated with the 2 guys working in the hobby store yesterday, because neither of them knew too much about the paints or glues.  Ironically this little hobby store I went to sells mostly model kits.  Plus, I don't think they were taking me as a serious model ship builder.  I guess I don't look like the type of person who would be doing model ships.  If my Santa Maria turns out really nice, I should take a picture in there to show them.  :D 

 

As for my Jolly Roger, I am just being creative on hooking up the ends of the sails on things.  The directions are just too confusing.  To top it off, they even had me put a yardarm onto an incorrect sail.  I thought it looked strange.  I had to pull it off and figure out which sail it actually went to.  The good news is I have learned more things from putting this ship together.  I am also getting better at attaching things.  I want to get past the sloppy look of things.  I am also learning more about the pieces that go on a ship and where they go.  I just still need to learn the names of the parts of a ship.  I am horrible at learning terms.  I am one of those that can never remember the name of a movie or the actors in the movie.  I drive people nuts trying to get them to figure out what I am referring to.  :huh:    

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Ahoy Kimberly :D

 

Humbrol paints are excellent. They are preferred by many modelers for brush painting. So for you they would be a good thing. Stay away from the enamels though. Humbrol has a full Acrylic line. http://www.humbrol.com/shop/paints/acrylic-paints/

 

 I love enamel paints and even use them on my wooden ships, but they are harder to use, less forgiving and require petroleum solvents . I would recommend that you stick with the Acrylics for now. Get some acrylic thinner if you don't have it already. It is much better then water to thin the paint. It has chemicals that slow the drying time and help the paint flow or "lay down". HL and M's both sell it.

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Okay, I will go with the acrylic paint.  There is an awesome hobby store a little ways from us that truly specializes in hobbies, such as model kits, train sets, etc.  I bet they would have all kinds of the things I need.

 

Yes, I do know how to write or draw on photos.  I am pretty handy when it comes to photoshop and desktop publisher.

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Kimberly,

Modeling for me has always been a thing that I could do that no one could say you were doing it right or wrong, a place of relaxation and the only person you had to satisfy was yourself. you will find that the more you do it the more you will learn and you will find there are several ways to do things. As for the painting part, you don't like how something turns out just simply paint over it, that has always worked for me. Keep going, you are doing a fine job.

 

Happy Modeling

 

Marty G.

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Ditto on the acrylic.  I use pretty much all water base now on my plastic models oils or stains on wood.  Easy to clean, they seem to last forever if sealed, and no smell.  One drawback is that some types, such as the arts and crafts brands, require a primer in order to adhere to the plastic.  Humbrol is a great line of paint as J.Pett indicated, for brush painting.  You are lucky you have a store nearby that stocks it.  Tamiya and Gungze Sangyo are two other brands of acrylic that are high quality specific for plastic models.

 

One drawback I do have with acrylics is that I cannot get the effect I want with washes.  Ulisis's Santa Maria is an excellent example of doing thin layers of color to shade over a base coat producing a deep, rich, 3 dimensional effect.  This is where I do a base coat with an acrylic, spray it with a lacquer clear coat, then will paint washes using oilpaint thinned with turpentine.

 

I like what you said about remembering terms.  I still get yard, spar, stay, brace, and shroud all confused.  I started sailing lessons a few years ago and drove my instructor nuts.

 

I remember the Jolly Roger instructions well, insomuch that I put the main tops'l yards on the fore mast.  This is the point where you model by sight, rule of thumb, and gut instinct.  Makes it more fun.  Life is full of rules and instructions, here is your chance to get a away from it all. :)

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Okay, here she is.  My version of the Jolly Roger Pirate Ship...literally. :D  My crew of pirates are quite embarrassed to be aboard her.  I did the sails all on my own.  I could not figure out the directions, so I winged it.  The sad part is I still have parts leftover that I have no idea where they were supposed to go.  Oh well, this has been a good practice ship.  I have to be honest.  I still feel very intimidated on building ships.  I am nervous about starting my Santa Maria.  I really want her to turn out good.  I am going to start my build log on it tomorrow.

 

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she turned out rather nice,  considering the problems you had with her.   I do thank you for letting me in on some of the problems with the build,  and how you overcame them.   armed with what you've learned here,  you should be able to handle anything the Santa Maria can throw at you......not only that,  but it's a better kit.  I'll look forward to your next adventure  ;)

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Ahoy Kimberly :D

 

Congratz on completing another kit

 

As for your Santa Maria, I would suggest that you consider doing some research. Develop a plan that will result in the model you want. Some of us will spend a months or even years on a model. For me it does two things. The models come out more to my liking and my house does not fill up with them. I still end up giving most of them away.  

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Hi Kimberly,

 

You did a good job on your Jolly Roger. She looks great.

 

I hate to say it, but for the next build, look more carefully how to place the masts.

Your mizzen mast tops ( mast on the left close to the stern ) should be the other way around......

 

animaatjes-sjors-94584.gif

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Thanks guys.  I really appreciate all your help and support.  I am definitely listening to your advice.  I started my build log for my Santa Maria.  I got the acrylic paints.  I also go a pin vise. :)  I am practicing the paint and the Tam. thin glue on scraps.  Boy, I realized I am going to need to have some ventilation with that glue.

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