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Kimberley

Jolly Roger Pirate Ship by Kimberley - FINISHED - Lindberg - PLASTIC - 1:130

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Woo Hoo, looks great :cheers::10_1_10:   any pirate would be proud to sail on her.

So, you disregarded the instructions to put the sails on and you have parts left over?  Well, I must say you have past into the category of now seasoned ship modeler.  Just wait, soon you will be measuring spars and masts with calipers and making your own because the one in the kit is too tall, too short, or you just want to do it for the fun of it.

 

Don't worry about the mizzen topmast being on backwards, I mounted all three masts on backwards on a Constitution, and this was after building this kit at least several times before.  Its such a bad problem for me that I now turn the ship about when placing masts.

 

Again, thanks for posting and have fun with the Santa Maria.

 

Scott

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Thanks guys!  You made me feel better.  I started my build log for my Revell Santa Maria.  I could sure use your help if you are willing to follow it.  I am still asking a question about painting.  Do I paint the pieces before starting anything else?

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Kim:

As a quick answer I would say YES!.... BUT... plan ahead. Mostly everything has to be painted on the tree, and when you snip the piece off, a small retouch may be needed where it was attached. In other occasions, you will need to scrap off the paint, if its on an area that has to be glued. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT! Glue will fail if placed on paint. You can paint your pieces by sections. Let's say you are working on your deck, paint all the pieces that belong to the deck. Study your instructions and build the kit in your head several times, if possible. Many times you will see that it will be better to deviate from the instructions to make some steps easier. There is no absolute way to do things, and many times you will get 5 different answers from 5 different people, and all of them may be valid. These are only some guidelines, but the best way to learn is by doing it. "A wise man (or woman) learns from his mistakes, a wiser man learns from the mistakes of others" ;)

Oh!, and the most important advise: Have Fun!!!

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Thanks Channel.  I wish it had turned out better.  I love pirate ships.  I am going to try another one later on.  A real one this time.  Here is the link to an artist, Maitz, who does awesome paintings of pirates.  http://www.paravia.com/DonMaitz/website/MaritimeHeritage/index.html

 

Anyway, I am working on the Revell Santa Maria now.

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Yes, that is a very scary Blackbeard! :o  I doubt his teeth were that white. :P

 

No, I don't have a favorite specific ship.  My favorite ships are the ones like I am building now.  The old type ships with the long masts, tons of sails, and a lot of rigging.  I don't know what their proper name is for them.  I love the way they look.  If you know what I mean.  I wish I could sail on a real one. 

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Very nicely done! I recommend you to make your own ratlines and sails (they are much more realistic than the plastic ones in the kit) and to improve the windows in the transom with styrene wire. You can weather the hull using pastel paints or by using the dry brush technique -apply some occre, rust, black, brown and green- to simulate old wood or copper, and the same effect can be achieved by soaking the sails (fabric ones, cut from an old t-shirt) in watercolors and then rubbing them with ground coffee. Here is my own version of the same model, which I modified to be the French frigate Guerriere:

 

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Aye, thats a good job! :-) There is one thing that still interests me, maybe you can make it too. I was thinking about realistic flag from silk. I know very small amount of things about it but i have seen it on several models so, and its very very worth making detail. Keep making good things man :D

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Arrrhg me maties!  Have fun with your build, Kim, it is your ship. 

 

Pirates would capture what ever ships they could and use them to capture more ships and booty. 

 

I dare say we don't know about every ship ussd in piracy so use your imagination and enjoy the build.

 

Duff

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Very nicely done! I recommend you to make your own ratlines and sails (they are much more realistic than the plastic ones in the kit) and to improve the windows in the transom with styrene wire. You can weather the hull using pastel paints or by using the dry brush technique -apply some occre, rust, black, brown and green- to simulate old wood or copper, and the same effect can be achieved by soaking the sails (fabric ones, cut from an old t-shirt) in watercolors and then rubbing them with ground coffee. Here is my own version of the same model, which I modified to be the French frigate Guerriere:

Nice job, Paisano! :)

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Aye, thats a good job! :-) There is one thing that still interests me, maybe you can make it too. I was thinking about realistic flag from silk. I know very small amount of things about it but i have seen it on several models so, and its very very worth making detail. Keep making good things man :D

Thanks. That is a good idea. My first idea was to make a waving flag, so I made it from plasticard. 

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Kimberly I was excited to find your log as the Lindberg Jolly Roger was my first ship.  I still have it in my boys room where it some how survives the tornado's that are 18 month and 4 years old boys.  I've been considering restoring it since I didn't know as much (or anything at all) about ship modeling then and the rigging and paint are a bit of an embarrassment.  My thoughts are to take off the top masts and redo it with wood and use actual thread lines for the rigging.  We'll see if I ever get to it.  A lot of other projects to finish first.

 

Your log brings back memories of trying to get this thing together.  I forgot how difficult it was.  I remember getting some parts in a "close enough position" because absolutely correct was not feasible.  The bowsprit was by far the hardest part.  I don't blame you at all for wanting a different kit.  Yours is coming along well though your doing great work.  Keep it up you'll be happy you completed it if for no better reason then to proved to this kit who was more stubborn. :piratetongueor4:          

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I still have mine..........after seeing your build,  I can't wait to start it :)  armed with your log......I think it will be a lot of fun to bash the crap out of this ship :D :D :D       I'd start it now.....but if I did,  the admiral would throw me out on my ear!   Eight is enough! :D :D

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Why am i just finding this build log now??? it looks awesome and makes me want to dig this one out of my stash

 

I built this kit a few years back and loved it. I actually bought 2, so I have another one in my stash that I intend to build as the La Flore (or Vestale as others have called it). When I built this first one I also just built it as a dirty privateer and came up with my own paint theme. It was fun. I used the plastic shrouds mainly because i wanted this to be a fun quick build.

 

jolleyroger025.jpg

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I think that this kit started life as a model of 'La Flore', a French Frigate. Name should be on the stern gingerbread work if Lindberg have not done anything to the tooling.

Their other pirate ship (Captain Kidd's) started life as the 'Wappen Von Hamburg'.

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Hi Kim, job on your Jolly Roger. I built this exact kit-twice. The first one turned out pretty bad but since it was not expensive I bought another one which turned out better. I did find out that I do like model shipbuilding but not plastic. This kit wass pretty bad. it was warped, and my cat kept trying to eat the small parts (those that didnt land in my carpet). I admire you for sticking with it. I found 2 kits on Amazon for about $40. The Bluenose and the Constitution. Thet are vest iery simplisitic solid hull (no planking or other hard stuff) but gives the feel of working with wood. They made me decide to invest in a quality wood model for the challenge. Hope you continue building bigger and better ships. :bird-vi:

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