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gulfmedic1

Why do you build THAT type of model

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I don’t think I seen this topic posted

 

So, I guess the title says it all but I wanted to expand on it. My background is not in the mariner field at all, the closest I have to that is being an offshore paramedic. But I do have a great love for boats and ships, even though my best friend had to show me how to launch and recover a boat to a trailer, (embarrassing I know).

So when I first got into wood ship building it was because I was tired of the plastic models and wanted something a little more challenging and as stated I like boats. So as I did my research and found MSW I was able to better determine what I wanted as my first build. Admitting, I really like seeing all those man-o-war ships and thought wow one day I’m going to build one of those. Well while I was deciding which model to do first I found the Phantom, and really like the way she looked, and her history and I think I was a little intimidated by planking.

The more I worked on my build and the more I looked at everyone else’s build. I came to realize that I really like non war ships. I like the Bluenose, J-Class yacht, Dragon, Atlantic Schooner, friendship sloop. I noticed that I also like boats like the, lobster smack, Mare Nostrum and tug boats. I think though my favorites are the sale boats like sloops, schooners and skipjacks.

They are just beautiful and majestic, at least to me. Though later on after MUCH experience I will still probably build a war ship, I mean you just have to right.

 

My point to all of this is that I started out thinking what I wanted and came to realize what I actually like and why. It’s probably a silly thread but I am curious so I thought I would put it out there.

 

So the question stands what boats/ships did you originally want to build and why, did that change later?

Do you stick with one type of build or do you just build across the board?

 

Scott

Edited by gulfmedic1

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Great question,,,,, inquring minds want to know and all that.

 

For me, the following are  the key points to consider.

 

Has it been built by dozens or hundreds of others?   If yes, I am less interested or not interested at all.  For example, I would like to build the a J Class sloop, but one that has not been seen a 100 times before.  Dozens of sheets of Ranger plans are readily available, but so are hundreds of Ranger models.  I would rather take a try at Enterprise, Rainbow, also designed by Burgess if plans can be had.

 

Are there original plans available?   Kit plans and other similar reproductions are often inaccurate, so the search (which is part of the fun -and frustration-) begins once I have a vessel or two in mind.  NMM, Library of Congress, Mystic, and  other maritime  museums/libraries are  great sources, albeit not cheap.

 

If it is a commission build, the buyer leads the way, but can often be led if handled delicately.   When asked to do the Bluenose I  offered the Effie M Morrisey as an alternate and it was accepted as an alternate.

 

How much time do I want to spend?  If I am up for a 3 year (or longer) project I lean towards British warships from the 18th century or early 19th century.

If I want to do a quicky, 4 to 6 months, a schooner or sloop fits the bill for time and my fondness for their looks.

 

Allan

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Very good question, Medic.  I am a new comer to model building (of any type).  The Harriet Lane is my first model in over 40 years (last was a tank back in junior high).  I had been pondering building a wooden ship model for a few weeks and made a spur of the moment stop at the hobby store and there she was.  Of course, it was also the only wooden ship they had there.  She came home!

 

I am rather conflicted.  I love the looks of sailing ships but am still very intimidated by the rigging (partly due to my klutzy thumbs around the dainty Miss Harriet).  Due to lack of skills, I am a kit builder, and will be for some time.  I have a preference to merchant sail - try to avoid those pesky cannons!- but seem to acquire kits with cannons.  The more I see of the working boats around here, the more I am drawn to them as a future build (see popeye's Lobsie twins for an example).

 

I have several in the staging area to work on - the Emma C. Berry is a fun build for me.  I also have another Revenue Cutter (the Ranger, renamed for my purposes the Detector), the Aeropicola Essex (I love the ship), 2 Phantom's (one for each son), and I have a Syren and Sergal Racehorse kit coming in as well.  Yeah, they have cannons.  Would love to build a Clipper (watching Richard and his Thermophylae and Ed with his Young America). 

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Why do I build the boats I do?  To answer that I need to go way back to the dark ages of my life, back before I married the admiral.  I had just read “Sea Quest” by Charles A. Borden about all the people he knew who sailed as a way of life.  I lived on a small boat in California at that time and was fixing it up to make it more livable.  Then I was going to take off for who knows where.  My plan was to work for supplies, stock the boat and move on.  Well that never happened.  So now these many years later I mostly build the boats that I could sail myself.  Sometimes I get side tracked with other boats, usually because I like the lines, but I always come back to the small boats, the ones that could be singlehanded.

 

Bob

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^you pretty much already built a clipper, but with a paddle wheel! Haha. If you liked the shape of that hull, you'll like a clipper ship. I personally don't like the contours of the clippers, it proves very difficult to plank.

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To my eyes, a Man O' War ship is one of the most beautiful things created by human hands. Any 3 masted ship with several lines of cannons is to me a majestic view, and very few things created by man can equal its beauty. The odd thing is that these ships came to be what they are due to necessity, not by aesthetic reasons. I mean, they didn't say "Lets put these 3 masts here and a bowsprit in front, and let's shape the hull this way because that's how it may look pretty" Those things are there because they needed to be, and coincidentally, they formed a thing so pleasant to look at. In my opinion, of course.

Not sure if I can explain my point. :P

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Ulises I completely understand what you are saying. My step dad told me about a war ship that was built (forgot what country) because they were mostly a trade country and wanted to be a war power. So they built this great big ship put a lot of stuff on it and put it in the water.

Well it sank. I think you do a great thing when you make something out of nessesity and then it turns out to be a beautiful work of art. Im sure when they started building war ships they didnt say, Hey lets make sure shes pretty lol

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Ulises I completely understand what you are saying. My step dad told me about a war ship that was built (forgot what country) because they were mostly a trade country and wanted to be a war power. So they built this great big ship put a lot of stuff on it and put it in the water.

Well it sank. I think you do a great thing when you make something out of nessesity and then it turns out to be a beautiful work of art. Im sure when they started building war ships they didnt say, Hey lets make sure shes pretty lol

Scott: What you describe sounds a lot  like the Vasa story. Vasa sank in her maiden voyage just one mile after launching on August 10th 1628, in Stockholm, Sweden.

I will not get here into all things Vasa related because I wouldn't end today :). There are several books written about it. See my Avatar and my build log. :)

Edited by Ulises Victoria

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awsome thanks Ulises

WOW just checked out your build, ok that is one beautiful Ship. im going to google her and find out more. I will check with my step dad to find out if thats the one he was talking about..wow all that work and she goes down a mile out

Edited by gulfmedic1

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Interesting topic!

I built various wooden ship models in my life, from scratch or from kit.

No one of them was of the same type of ship.

The driving force was always the overall appearance of the ship and my technical curiosity regarding hull, rigging and history.

Make a wooden model is not always an easy task and the driving force must be strong, in order to overcome the problems that can happens during its construction.

I made a xebec, a cutter, the Endeavour, a pirate junk, a brigantine, an XVI galleon, and others.

All were generally filled with guns (why not? the human history is made mainly of wars!) but all were slighty different each others, in terms of age, rigging, size...

Each model was not only an improvement on handcrafting, but mainly an historical and technical enrichment (hope the term is right), since each time I learned some more about a specific country or a type of ship.

Each model, once on the shelf, represent a small piece of mankind history (well, sometimes very small)!

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i have always been interested in history (i wanted to be an archeologist when i was a  kid)

 

2 years ago i mentioned to my wife that i would like to build a wooden model ship as up til then i only build plastic models

she gave me the virginia for my bday.

 

the next one which i am still working on is the king of the mississippi mainly because after the first ship i knew i needed a lot more experience working with wood before i dared start on a bigger ship

 

the endeavour wil be my first big ship project (started on her already) and currently workign on the Gorch Fock (which i bought because i liked the look and the price)

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I started late in life with models. My current build is my second ever. My father scratch built a galleon before I was ever born ans I remember examining every detail. He was killed when I was a child and it was wonderful to have something he had built. It left me with a soft spot in my heart for galleons, or as mentioned in a previous post, any three masted ship. When my father's model was destroyed during a long distance move, I vowed to build one some day as sort of a tribute...mission accomplished. The only unexpected result - a model ship building addiction.  :huh:

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Wonderful topic!!

 

For me - I have just always loved creating things.  When I was younger it was the normal "boy" models.  Race Cars, motorcylces, jets, tanks etc.    As I grew up i still found ways to create - writing, playing music, eventually programming and software engineering as a profession.   Always looking for things to create and growing up in the hobby world I turned to the wooden ships and asked myself that same question.   What ships do I want to build.  The answer BIG SHIPS!!   Then as I started looking around at sites and eventually found MSW and saw the work people did I trended away from BIG SHIPS!! and more towards those ships which caught my eye.  No real reason, or at least one that I can put into words but something about a given ship or a given kit just drew me towards it.  Whether it was seeing what went into building it and making me think - I want to do that!  Or just the look of the ship.   I wish I had a more concrete answer for the topic but I guess the answer - for me anyway - is whatever floats my boat :D   I've always loved the looks of the ole tall ships and thought I knew which ones were my favorites - boy has that changed since getting into the hobby!!

 

The trouble is, there are far more ships I want to build than I realistically have time for!   But if it catches my eye or intrigues me in some way - it is on my list!!!

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I honestly have no idea what drew me to model shipbuilding - I built one or two plastic model cars when I was a kid, but was never committed to it as a pastime. I then watched that HBO show "The Wire" - one of the characters in it build scale furniture for doll houses and something about that clicked for me...

 

At first my kit choices were based on skill level (though always with an eye to more complex builds), but variety was always a factor, as well. I wanted (and still want) to build as many types of vessel as possible. My signature lists the builds, so you can get a sense. I love the simple fishing vessels and often wish there were more of these in large scale. The Glad Tidings Pinky Schooner has undoubtedly been my favourite build to date - the most satisfying and one of the most interesting - at 1:25 scale it is an impressive model, as well. I don't often think about doing models again, but I would do the Pinky again and add a lot more of the details of a working boat.

 

hamilton

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Ulises

I have been doing research on the Vasa and its story is amazing. I think once I retire (long from now ) I might have to give that one a try. By then i should have the time put in to do a build of that magnitude also the money, shes not a cheap kit

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I guess I'm this forum's weird duck because I prefer to build larger scale plastic warships and go crazy on superdetailing them.

 

 

I love tall ships though... and when it comes to models of tall ships I love to look at them but hate to work on them. :P

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Great topic. 

Like most everybody here I started with plastic models as a kid. In the back of my mind I always wanted to try a wooden ship but never really got around to it. A few years ago I was asked to build a childs bed with a pirate ship theme. It was lapstraked and even had a cannon on the bow. I had a great time building it and afterwards started to really get the urge to build a sailing ship. About the same time work slowed down and I had lots of time on my hands so I picked up the Enterprise and dug in. No real reason for the Enterprise other than an interest in the WWII carrier and this kit appeared to be relatively easy.

 

That was 2010 and I am just now getting to deck furniture. I most likely would have finished by now except I started "upgrading" items. One day she will be completed maybe even by mid 2014, who knows? In the meantime I am having a great time - my grumbling about my mistake notwithstanding. After this who know, I plan to build the Rattlesnake but have seen several others that look like fun, time will tell

 

Sam

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Ulises

I have been doing research on the Vasa and its story is amazing. I think once I retire (long from now ) I might have to give that one a try. By then i should have the time put in to do a build of that magnitude also the money, shes not a cheap kit

Scott: So... was Vasa the one your stepdad was talking about?. I'm curious!

Keep an eye on Model Expo. Subscribe to their mailing list. They sometimes have enormous discounts in ship kits. As a matter of fact, Vasa wasn't in my "to buy" list, but when I saw the kit at 350 dlls I just couldn't resist and had to get it. Am I glad I did!!!! 

Edited by Ulises Victoria

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Ulises

matter of fact it was the same, we had a long discussion about it, he loves ships as well. He is a great craftsman, his wood work is beautiful but his blacksmith work is even better. I showd him the link with the pics of the Vasa and we talked about each part in depth, he actually is following my build through pics on my phone lol

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I guess I'm this forum's weird duck because I prefer to build larger scale plastic warships and go crazy on superdetailing them.

 

 

I love tall ships though... and when it comes to models of tall ships I love to look at them but hate to work on them. :P

Channell

no odd duck at all i got into models with airplanes being in the Air Force I obviously liked them, i would spend hours detailing the cockpits so that each part matched the original aircraft, the admiral used to fuss saying why do you spend so much time on details when you really wont be able to see them

my response was because i can, and i know its there lol

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Started with plastic and moved on to wood kits, Dutch flat bottom boats (boeier, leemsteraak, schuit, tjalk).  I love the lines and always wanted to own one (I am a Dutchman living in the US).  Did built the Bounty but prefer to build VOC (Dutch East Indies).  Finishing up the Royal yacht Mary and on to the Utrecht (Statenjacht), my first POF scratch.  Plan on building the Valkenisse, Batavia and the Ships from Abel Tasman (Heemskerck and the Zeehaen).

 

So Jacht's, Fluits, and flat bottom boats is what I am most interested in.

 

Marc

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I would have to say that I enjoy building models of boats I have sailed or admired primarily smaller sailboats (generally under 35 ft)

 

Best regards,

Pete

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Ship modelling was a progression for me. actually a downsizing. I'd always puttered with wood and collected antique tools. I was actually involved in building a rathskellar looking like a wood shop. Had a HUGE wooden workbench from a commercial shop that was to be the bar. Went to Alaska and built 3 1:1 boats. When I returned got into furniture and after filling the house and a couple of pieces for my daughter, decided that big, heavy 'stuff' was too much of a pane. Switched to 2" to the foot and built a Friendship Sloop. Found a place for it in a bedroom, with a peaked ceilingf :) . Built a model of a fishing schooner (LA Dunton) at 1/2" scale and liked the results. All models done from actual plans and lofted to scale. Found time to do a cradle, in the form of a Whitehall Skiff, for my Grandson. Then combined my love of computers and ship building construction methods and started a 5 year odessy on creating a set of model plans for the Whaling Ship Morgan. Got burned out until some partial model plans became available. Did the Gun Ship Section and now am building the Foward Magazine Section, both in 1/2" scale and both from MSB. Started a computer project for an (hypothetical) 1750-1800 Shipyard based on Dodds and Moore's "Building the Wooden Fighting Ship". To that end I am learning Blender which will be used for rendering and scenery with TurboCad used for the specific tool modelling.

 

Just reread and seems like a fair Odessy. :)

Ed

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From an early age I've always loved ships. Friends were building plastic aircraft, I could never understand that, absolutely no attraction for me.

My first plastic kit was Revelll's Cutty Sark which I completed and was enormously proud of, even though I'm sure it was a below average model.  I was always into building things, Meccano was the rage for me  - my most precious possesion was my No 10 set with clockwork motor and gear set.  The world of engineers shrunk when Meccano went out of business!

After that it was tentative steps to scratch building - collecting ice cream sticks and using those as building materials. Carving small free style boats out of solid - a friends father was a carpenter and used to give me small billets of a soft wood called Jelutong. Using pine bark collected on outings for small fittings, matchsticks and sucker sticks.

I joined the Merchant Navy and for those years, my modelling was confined to small static boats, something that I could pack up in a suit case - sometimes even plastic kits. But  always ships, always ships.

Later, it was RC boats. Tugs, period sailing ships, for a while IOM racing yachts. All scratch built but a serious drain on the wallet  - brushless motors, ESCs, LiPo batteries, chargers, servos, etc etc.  I still take out my RC boats but will not buy any new equipment - one old boat will have to go to make room for a new one.

Now, it's back to static modelling- my  models are what I would call "coffee table"models - they look extremely good but I really don't have the patience for the extreme accuracy that I see on (some) models on this forum. Treenailing for me is akin to peeling mushrooms. I have given away a few of my models and plan to give away more. There's always another model waiting!

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I agree - a great topic.

 

I have always liked ship models since I was a kid. Made a few in plastic but made models in plastic of many different things too. Then I met a guy who was building and importing wooden kits from Sergal/Mantua/Panart. I had never realised that these things existed and took on my first wooden ship - the Dutch Whaler. A mad first choice. Built the hull but then realised the whole thing was wrong in terms of scale and never finished it and never will but the hull still is proudly placed in my living room. Some years latter I re-found the desire and chose a ship that appealed to my eye and seemed simple enough to complete. I finished the Armed Virginia Sloop and liked the way it came out. I decided I liked this era and its elegant lines. HMS Fly is a big step up but it has all the things I want to challenge me - gratings, ladders, cannons, a ships boat and complex rigging. Being a big O'Brien fan also helps. The other motivation is the huge amount of information that is available through all sorts of sources on ships of this time particularly the TFFM series by Seawatch books.

 

So, why do I build THIS type of model?:

- Great lines and very elegant

- A wealth of detail

- A wealth of information available for research

- A golden age of sail

- A well recognised kit in terms of quality and accuracy

 

My thoughts.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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For me I like weird or gawdy ships... I started with the Bounty's Jolly boat which was just the hook....then I got the Harriet Lane which was super fun and kinda weird because it is a transition ship (Adam, glad to see you let yours off the shelf)...now I'm working on a crabbing/fishing boat because it looked...well.....cute hehe. Next will be the Unicorn because I like the figurehead...Strange reasons...sure but as long as something is enough to maintain your interest you're good to go.

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When I was child/youth, in former Yugoslavia you can by only little simple plastic kits (Heller) and did it a lot ( You can finish each kit in week or two)

In mean time, I dont remember how, one day when I was in Pula ( HR) I found store with "serious" wooden kits (TEHNODIDAKTA) with their own made plans and kits. Many years passed ( almost 40) and I only remember that It was pretty simple kit of Santa Maria, and I have done it. Then I wish to try myself in some more complex and bought their  Cutty Sark .Then was possibility of chose among their kits: Santa Maria, domestic Jadran, Bounty, Bracera and some small domestic ships, and CS was most compexed and the largest, so I pick it. Later in life I was fascinated with sails, ropes, tall ships, clippers ... rather than galleons and  war ships.

 

Then follow 30 years pause, and ... I have plans of CS ... lets goooo. Fascinating with sail-ships , and already having plans was real reason to build exactly this ship model

 

And then find MSW, and focused myself in details, then find Campbell plans ... and slowly sink to dark side ...

Edited by Nenad M

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In general,  this topic brings me back to my childhood when movies such as "The Crimson Pirate", "Captain Blood", "Horatio Hornblower" were braodcasted and as a little boy I begged my parents : ¨Please Mum, please Dad, can I stay up watching ?"..

So I kept my fascination related to 17th & 18 th century ships ever since.

Regarding my current build : frigates of the late 18 th century are very appealing to me because  I like the combination of straight lines and still a few ornaments

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