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flying_dutchman2

Utrecht by flying_dutchman2 – FINISHED - Scale 1:48, Dutch Statenjacht of 1746 (first scratch build)

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Hi there;

 

This is my first scratch built.  I’ve thought long and hard about it and the last kit (HMS Bounty – Constructo) I built, I changed numerous items as they were not accurate to that year it was built. So if I can do that, I can build a boat where I am in complete control.

 

I decided on the Statenjacht “Utrecht”, because I love the lines from (plat bodems) flat bottom boats. I bought the book on the Utrecht from Seawatch books a while back because I am interested on how they built the replica. In the late 80’s I had a friend who worked as a volunteer carpenter on the Batavia replica in Lelystad, The Netherlands and I was with the amount of wood that went into building that boat.

 

This year I purchased another book on the Utrecht authored by Gilbert McArdle, also from Seawatch books. This gave me insights on how to build the boat. I will not build it the way he did it.  I will not do a “no deck boat” where you can see the interior. My plan is add a deck with cannons and all the deck items, sails and all the rigging.

 

I am getting ahead of myself as I still have to finish "The Royal Yacht Mary".

 

I started by copying all the frames and taping them with clear packing tape on the basswood.  The reason of the packing tape is that this tape will lubricate the saw blade at all times and the use of basswood is that this wood is cheap and once the deck is on you will never see it.

 

 

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Edited by flying_dutchman2
Finished

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This boat will be built from ready pre-cut wood as I do not have the equipment to create a plank from a large piece of wood.

I have some very knowledgeable people in my Nautical club and they have given me numerous suggestion what wood I can use for what part of the boat.

 

I am finishing up taping the frames to the wood.

 

So I do have a question:

If you build a POF, why cut the frames up into futtocks (sp) and then plank both the outside and the inside of the boat and add a deck?  Is it a sawing exercise?

 

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So I do have a question:

If you build a POF, why cut the frames up into futtocks (sp) and then plank both the outside and the inside of the boat and add a deck?  Is it a sawing exercise?

 

We actually cut out the futtocks and glue them together to make the frames.   There are two reasons:  1) It does save on wood.  2) It makes the frames stronger.

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We actually cut out the futtocks and glue them together to make the frames.   There are two reasons:  1) It does save on wood.  2) It makes the frames stronger.

How does it save on wood?  On the Utrecht it is a frame cut in pieces and then glued together.  I understand if it is stronger 'if' the frame is of 2 layers, so several futtocks like the cross section of the Syren (as seen on your build).

I am planning to saw the frames as McArdle suggests.  So not exact on the line.  So rough cut.  Then when all the frames a glued together I will sand it all in shape.  Nothing is exact, just look at pictures when they build an actual replica.

Marc

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This is going to be very interesting.

 

It is also stronger as the wood grain is running in the right direction. Utrecht has frames that are almost square,

so sawing them in one piece will seriously lower their strenght, as at least one parft of the frame is cross-grained. 

 

Are you also adding the frame pieces that are in the 'real ship' to attacht the futtocks to the floor-parts of the frame?

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More pics of the build on http://veilinghaven.statenjacht.nl/het_schip/foto.htm (don't change the language to english, or you will loose all the interesting pictures :) )

 

And just to show you my pics of the actual replica:

https://picasaweb.google.com/101597346346552139735/UtrechtsStatenjacht?authuser=0&feat=directlink

 

Jan

Edited by amateur

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Marc,

 

I suppose one could make the frames out of one plank, though plywood would be stronger and would work if the inside and outside are fully planked.   I'm considering doing that way on my next build as my builds have and probably will be fully planked. 

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If you were to make the frames out of one sheet. the frame will break along the grain. And you will be wasting a lot of wood.   By building with futtocks you will maximize usage and insure the grain is all in one direction.  Making the fraames much stronger and less prone to breakage.

David B

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Welcome aboard Marc!

 

I hope you understand me. Are just thougths. If you are going to make a POF model you are going to have to make lots of futtocks and put´em together. If you are going to plank both, the interior and exterior you could make the frames using plywood (laminated) as Mark is suggesting. By gluing some chocks of pine wood at the ends and between of the frames the strength you achieve is enormous.

 

If you are going to go for the POF option, what I recomend you, cut the patterns and take your time to glue them in "order" on the wood sheet you are using. You´ll save lots of wood.

 

 

Best wishes!

 

 

Daniel.

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More pics of the build on http://veilinghaven.statenjacht.nl/het_schip/foto.htm (don't change the language to english, or you will loose all the interesting pictures :) )

 

And just to show you my pics of the actual replica:

https://picasaweb.google.com/101597346346552139735/UtrechtsStatenjacht?authuser=0&feat=directlink

 

Jan

 

I don't have to change to English as I am fluent in Dutch.

 

Your pics from the replica........ did you work on this boat?

 

Marc

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No I used to work in Utrecht, and from work to home I just passed this ship every day (at least, in the winter months).

ANd last year a member on MSW was working on a paper version of the ship, and asked for a couple of pics, mainly of the details of the ship (especially because the scrollwork as build differs from the scrollwork as drawn in the plans)

So I took my canmera to my work, and made a couple pf shots. And as there was someone on deck, I asked for a small tour around the ship.

Jan

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But it explains your fluency in Dutch :)

(btw School long gone)

 

Jan

Wonder if they merged with others.  I wanted to go to Boskoop but the wait time to get in was more than 2 years.  Only the best of the best go there. That is why all the well known commercial plants are bred there.  Sorry, for going off topic.

Marc

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Hi flying dutchman,

 

Nice to see you like the old Dutch ships al lot..!
Woow, you are building the Utrechts Statenjacht! The replica of this is has a berth in front of my house!..

If you need more information or specific pictures of parts, just let me know. Its a 2 minute walk to make the pictures.
In the summertime she is sailing around in our area with tourists and partys.

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Hi flying dutchman,

 

Nice to see you like the old Dutch ships al lot..!

Woow, you are building the Utrechts Statenjacht! The replica of this is has a berth in front of my house!..

If you need more information or specific pictures of parts, just let me know. Its a 2 minute walk to make the pictures.

In the summertime she is sailing around in our area with tourists and partys.

BWPETERS;

Always liked the Dutch ships, I am a Dutchman living in the US. I will let you know if I need more detailed pictures of the Utrecht besides what I can find on the Net. I like all round en flat bottom boats plus the many Staten, Prinsen en admiral jachten. The war jacht from Abel Tasman is impressive as well.

 

In due time I know I would like to have more pictures of her carvings. I need more different angels. Also het boegbeeld (figurehead), the lion. The facial expression is unique.

 

Marc

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As of today I started cutting out the frame pieces and there is a lot of them. I have the scroll saw outside due to the nice weather. Once cut, I will start putting the hull together according to McArdle's book. Yes, it scares me a bit. If I compare it to a kit, than a kit is so much easier. You follow the plan and you have yourself a ship.

But with the help of my local club and the immense knowledge on this site, I feel confident I can do this. Most of all, I will have fun.

 

Pictures will follow.

Marc

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This is a clamp that I copied out of the McArdle book. The clamp has 2 - 1/4" threaded rods with nuts and the wood is old plywood. It will hold any size hull together. Depended on the length of the threaded rods.

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The cut out frames.

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The scrap wood that I will be using for the ‘in betweeners’ of the frames or I think they are called chocks. Pieces of wood that go in between the frames.

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Table full of Tupperware with frames in them. The real boat will be a POF but there are also frames for a simple POB hull I will be building.

 

The table is a bit messy, with the Mary under plastic (she is waiting for her display case and the hull on the left is a R/C Soling 1 meter. This model I bought used from a member in my local club. The fish in front of the speaker is a small puzzle. I create simple nature puzzles for kids with the scroll saw.

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Chocks that are being glued to the frame.

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Several boo-boos have been made. Some of the frames are 1/4" where they have to be 3/16" and vice versa. There are more 1/4" frames than 3/16" so the boat is about a 1/2" longer than the original plan. I thought of re-doing these frames but it is all wood, so one can manipulate this very easily.

 

I checked the plans from Hoving and Emke and it is not significant. The boat will just be a wee bit longer.

 

Marc

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