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20 minutes ago, Roger Pellett said:

I was pleased to receive the honorable mention award in the nonfiction category for my book Whaleback Ships and the American Steel Barge Company.

 

Roger

 

 

Congratulations Roger. That's quite an accomplishment.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Guys,

 

Kurt, I am looking forward to your review.

 

In this case I was not disappointed in not receivingthe top award.  It went to an excellent book written by the retired superintendent of the National Monument at Grand Portage, MN about the Lake Superior fur trade.

 

Roger

Edited by Roger Pellett

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While in Niagara, Ontario for a carving class, meddo and I got to go on a pilgrimage of sorts...

IMG_4199.JPG.a3b854094961f8b40622c8bece827fd6.JPG

To commemorate the pilgrimage, I picked up a souvenir:

IMG_4200.thumb.JPG.a5857909290734ba9e0107287e5ffd43.JPG

I am hoping to find a useful purpose for it very soon!!

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JD can we go back?  I got home just in time for a major storm which put a whole bunch of tornadoes right through the north half of the city took down all her power all her water supply internets going down the place is a mess.  Niagra on the lake is so much nicer now😛

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Michael,

Glad you're safe and no damage.  I've been checking with relatives back there and so far only damage was one that had a tree blow over.  Went through a few of them when I lived there.  Scary...  

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In our area, hurricanes are our nemesis. In other areas, it's tornadoes, or wild fires, or earthquakes, or flooding, or tsunami's or whatever. Seems like there is no end to natural disasters on this old planet of hours and it has always been so. 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, druxey said:

Is this nature's way of suggesting you move to Niagara?.

Druxey, are you, Niagara on the Lake, being affected by the rising levels of Lake Ontario like Rochester NY is ?  Lake shore flooding ?

Edited by Jack12477

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8 hours ago, druxey said:

Is this nature's way of suggesting you move to Niagara? Hopefully only material, not human, damage. Best wishes as you and your community recover from this.

Haha! That's the first thing I said after the storms to my wife

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Posted (edited)

Last fall, my neighbor had a bedroom and bath added on to his house. While digging the trench for the plumbing, the contractor destroyed my landscaping on that side of the house. It took the man seven months to add the bed and bath. He promised to fix my yard when he was done. He started prevaricating big time. Like I would let them take seven months to fix my yard. Finally I had to call him and give him until the end of the month (three weeks) to get the job done. He called me a name that I can't say on here, and said nobody can see my yard so it doesn't matter. I told him to stay off my property and that I would find somebody else to do it and send him the bill.

 

So I took him to court in Small Claims Court. Today I went there and he didn't show up. The judge liked the photos and the documentation, quotes and receipts that I presented so I easily won the case, now I have to chase him down to get the money.

Edited by JustBlowingInTheWind
Typo's

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Practicing with my laser and my cutting software.

 

Shingled a bird house..

 

BirdHouse.jpg.729ed7c14883ee3ac5ba9fe2b9c0f4b6.jpg

 

This little house usually has a family in it during Spring, but had moved out for the summer, so I  took the opportunity to put on a new roof.

Looks like I need to paint, or face an appraisal downgrade..  Oh, well. At least the taxes will be lower, and the insurance too, what with the new roof and all..

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Today I experimented with cherry, padauk and epoxy.  I'm making a cockpit table for the boat.  Yes, I know, bad choices in wood.  But I have had this really nice figured cherry sitting in the shop and there is nothing that brings joy more than working on the boat.  So....

 

The underside

CpitTbl_009.jpg.7a4e88e533cda83b87959156208a8a53.jpg

The wings

CpitTbl_010.jpg.85c78cd8acf6b1499f3e5664a0679758.jpg

I used West Systems 105 epoxy to bond the rails then diluted the remaining with Behkol for penetrating epoxy sealant on the cherry

CpitTbl_011.jpg.f7e051c88aaa7ccfe0c9b063ecabc8ae.jpg

The cherry is going to get a lot darker.  I've used the padauk in other pieces and it has retained some of the red.  We'll see how it works on the boat.

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Some changes with the next coats - use slow hardener; stir very slowly for a couple of minutes to avoid air bubbles; run the brush slowly across the surface.

Air bubbles - No matter how careful I've been with mixing and applying the penetrating epoxy, the air bubbles persist.  Usually you can apply some heat to pop them but I tried that with a heat gun and watched as the epoxy quickly bubbled and turned white.  Thankfully, a quick run over it with a wet brush made the mess disappear.  More experimentation is necessary.

Speaking of experimenting, I've been experimenting with the best method to flatten the surface in preparation for the next coat.  I've settled on a card scraper followed by a little sandpaper.
CpitTbl_012.jpg

When I was working on this piece I noticed some dried air bubbles in the corner, sealed in epoxy.  The card scraper was able to eventually knock it down to nothing.
CpitTbl_013.jpg

I just finished laying the next coat of penetrating epoxy.  And the bubbles returned.  
CpitTbl_014.jpg

What I think is happening is the porous wood is soaking in the epoxy which in turn is forming the air bubbles.  So the epoxy is probably too thick.  It's been the consistency of skim milk but maybe it needs to be even thinner.  Whatever the case, the epoxy coatings will continue until I know the wood is completely sealed.

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Years ago I made some clocks with photos and everything covered with epoxy.  The trick I learned from another guy who made some also back then was to use an torch (butane) with a broad flame and low feed pressure.  Hold back so as not scorch the epoxy.   Supposedly the combination of the heat and CO2 generated by the flame was reason why it worked.  

 

Disclaimer... if you try it, do it on scrap and outside with proper fire extinguishing equipment nearby.  Even if does what you want, do it outside on the final product.  

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On 6/24/2019 at 9:30 AM, Julie Mo said:

Some changes with the next coats - use slow hardener; stir very slowly for a couple of minutes to avoid air bubbles; run the brush slowly across the surface.

Air bubbles - No matter how careful I've been with mixing and applying the penetrating epoxy, the air bubbles persist.  Usually you can apply some heat to pop them but I tried that with a heat gun and watched as the epoxy quickly bubbled and turned white.  Thankfully, a quick run over it with a wet brush made the mess disappear.  More experimentation is necessary.

Speaking of experimenting, I've been experimenting with the best method to flatten the surface in preparation for the next coat.  I've settled on a card scraper followed by a little sandpaper.
CpitTbl_012.jpg

When I was working on this piece I noticed some dried air bubbles in the corner, sealed in epoxy.  The card scraper was able to eventually knock it down to nothing.
CpitTbl_013.jpg

I just finished laying the next coat of penetrating epoxy.  And the bubbles returned.  
CpitTbl_014.jpg

What I think is happening is the porous wood is soaking in the epoxy which in turn is forming the air bubbles.  So the epoxy is probably too thick.  It's been the consistency of skim milk but maybe it needs to be even thinner.  Whatever the case, the epoxy coatings will continue until I know the wood is completely sealed.

Watch this video it's about making river tables with epoxy and wood(have a 8'slab of cedar) it's as MTaylor said but you get to see the process in action  

 

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Me today getting the house back in order laid a room with an interlocking slabs of laminate (3rd room now) I will be glad when momma goes back to work(teacher) then I can start my vacation she has been working me like a dog.She tried and will continue to try tosell her bedroom set we bought 35yrs ago solid oak and she wants to downsize and have me build her a bed with draws underneath.I only really want to this if it has both a headboard and a foot board.Now she's thinking not so dark a wood and I have such beautiful Saple and Philippine Mahogany with some ribbon in it :huh:The wood in the pic looks like Ash or Birch maybe and I could be good with that I just do not like staining I want the natural beauty to of the wood and it's color to come out.I am tired between work and the house 21days without a real day off I might have to run away :D

queen-storage-bed-plans-queen-and-king-size-storage-bed-plans-queen-storage-platform-bed-diy.jpg

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13 hours ago, Javlin said:

Watch this video it's about making river tables with epoxy and wood(have a 8'slab of cedar) it's as MTaylor said but you get to see the process in action 

I've used epoxy on a live edge table I made and used a torch to take out the bubbles.  I used Ecopoxy for that table and they recommended using a torch.  This time I'm using West Systems epoxy and they suggested using a heat gun.  So I gave that a shot thinking I wouldn't risk the epoxy catching fire. 

 

On another forum, one experienced boater said to use a shop vac on a sealed mixing cup to draw out bubbles.  He also suggested spritzing acetone lightly over the epoxy.  But he did say bubbles are forming due to epoxy replacing air in the wood.  Since the second coat produced substantially less bubbles than the first, I'm thinking third time may be the charm.  If not, out comes the torch.  But if any latent bubbles appear after I walk out of the shop...  I guess I'll have to rely on the Interlux poly varnish to finish the job. 

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Julie when I was coating my kayak I found I had more bubbles show up when the temperature was rising (in the am) than when it was falling (in evening).  I did eventually put a bunch of coats on and the bubbles lessened each time.  I would just pop the bubble  with a pin before it set completely and light sand it and it disappeared after next coat. I used a water reducible linear polyurethane in a few coats after copious sanding resulted in a glass smooth finish. Seemed to work out pretty nicely for my first attempt.

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16 hours ago, Javlin said:

Me today getting the house back in order laid a room with an interlocking slabs of laminate (3rd room now) I will be glad when momma goes back to work(teacher) then I can start my vacation she has been working me like a dog.She tried and will continue to try tosell her bedroom set we bought 35yrs ago solid oak and she wants to downsize and have me build her a bed with draws underneath.I only really want to this if it has both a headboard and a foot board.Now she's thinking not so dark a wood and I have such beautiful Saple and Philippine Mahogany with some ribbon in it :huh:The wood in the pic looks like Ash or Birch maybe and I could be good with that I just do not like staining I want the natural beauty to of the wood and it's color to come out.I am tired between work and the house 21days without a real day off I might have to run away :D

queen-storage-bed-plans-queen-and-king-size-storage-bed-plans-queen-storage-platform-bed-diy.jpg

    Of course, with the current mattress industry obsession making 18" or thicker mattresses, your design would either require a major revision or a step ladder to get aboard. :D  Very nice workmanship though.

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Finalized my design for a diorama deck for my MS Sea Mortar kit.

 

Overall with covers in place

 

 

634187102_MortorWell3DThinnerRailsandCoverIncluded_58FinalParts_01Sheet_01Graphics_04Assembled_09copy.thumb.jpg.6b57c6af15e375c2b7bb11ac870de544.jpg

With the cover assemblies removed, but the support beams in place. The center well is for the turntable in the base.

 

131657249_MortorWell3DThinnerRailsandCoverIncluded_58FinalParts_01Sheet_01Graphics_04PitWithBeams_03.thumb.jpg.0e70934e1caa5351153267b9bf6546af.jpg

 

 

Exploded view (on its side so I could show a larger view).

 

1931619872_MortorWell3DThinnerRailsandCoverandNarrowDecking_58FinalParts_01Sheet_01Graphics_04Exploded_16copy.thumb.jpg.7fad3e9a9248cd688869d10b838ea78e.jpg

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, BETAQDAVE said:

    Of course, with the current mattress industry obsession making 18" or thicker mattresses, your design would either require a major revision or a step ladder to get aboard. :D  Very nice workmanship though.

Thks but not my build quite yet but a will build before long.;) Kevin

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13 hours ago, Julie Mo said:

I've used epoxy on a live edge table I made and used a torch to take out the bubbles.  I used Ecopoxy for that table and they recommended using a torch.  This time I'm using West Systems epoxy and they suggested using a heat gun.  So I gave that a shot thinking I wouldn't risk the epoxy catching fire. 

 

On another forum, one experienced boater said to use a shop vac on a sealed mixing cup to draw out bubbles.  He also suggested spritzing acetone lightly over the epoxy.  But he did say bubbles are forming due to epoxy replacing air in the wood.  Since the second coat produced substantially less bubbles than the first, I'm thinking third time may be the charm.  If not, out comes the torch.  But if any latent bubbles appear after I walk out of the shop...  I guess I'll have to rely on the Interlux poly varnish to finish the job. 

I have not done what you are doing Julie it's something in the wings with a hundred other wood projects but have seen alot of videos with excellent results.I keep my eyes open for your reports to how it is going. ;) Kevin

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Today, I glued previously cut parts together, decided I didn't like the way they fit so cut some new ones.  Then did it again with the same parts.  Seems like it was "rinse and repeat" day all day long.

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38 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

Today, I glued previously cut parts together, decided I didn't like the way they fit so cut some new ones.  Then did it again with the same parts.  Seems like it was "rinse and repeat" day all day long.

"Dig a ditch and fill it up"Life

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