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The "What have you done today?" thread.

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5 hours ago, rshousha said:

Completed my first 1:1 scale items. I've been looking for good boxes for my vinyl record collection for some time now. Finally, I decided to just build them myself. Designed in Solidworks, cut on a CNC router, and finished by hand. 

 

 

IMG_2616-1.JPG

 

IMG_2618-1.JPG

 

Some Nice work there Rick and vinyl they is kinda coming back sound better than cd's.;) Kevin

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This weekend the wife and I were sitting on the patio ignoring each other, she on her smart phone, and me on my laptop. I was on Amazon searching for model wooden ships when I saw a wooden model steam locomotive. I emailed a link to my wife and she looks at it and then looks at what other people ordered with it. She found a track, a passenger car, and a railroad crossing. 

 

Shows them to me and asks if they would be cool too. Heck yeah, right? Plays with her phone for a bit, then tells mne not to open any boxes that come  over the next few days or I'll mess up my Christmas.

 

You can wind this thing up and it moves while showing you how the steam engine works. Doesn't require glue but I think I'll use it anyway.

train.jpg

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15 hours ago, Gregory said:

What do you mean " former" Marines?

 

Semper Fi !

 

Those who are no longer on active duty.  Or to paraphrase.... the ones who have served their time in hell. 

 

But yes, once a Marine, always a Marine.   Semper Fi!

 

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3 hours ago, Clueless said:

This weekend the wife and I were sitting on the patio ignoring each other, she on her smart phone, and me on my laptop. I was on Amazon searching for model wooden ships when I saw a wooden model steam locomotive. I emailed a link to my wife and she looks at it and then looks at what other people ordered with it. She found a track, a passenger car, and a railroad crossing. 

 

Shows them to me and asks if they would be cool too. Heck yeah, right? Plays with her phone for a bit, then tells mne not to open any boxes that come  over the next few days or I'll mess up my Christmas.

 

You can wind this thing up and it moves while showing you how the steam engine works. Doesn't require glue but I think I'll use it anyway.

train.jpg

 

 

Do a search in the Non-Ship Model area.  There's been a few of those models built.   Interesting kits.

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Lately I have been considering what I could possibly build that would # 1 be a relatively quick build that could help rekindle my interest in model building. And #2 give me some recent experience in building that is newer than two decades old and incorporates at least some new techniques and materials. Also I hopefully will build some modern skills to match that will aid me in future builds. The model would also have to be something of personal interest in order for me to maintain the building desire through to competition. It would also be nice if it was something that has not been done 25 times already here by modelers with ten times my skill level. I would rather not intentionally embarrass myself.

 

I dug through my stash of kits and I must admit I can cover almost any area of modeling from the mundane to the exotic. I have cars, ships, old and new, science fiction, military vehicles and aircraft including some experimental classics. I have figures and statues, (Not necessarily the same thing) I even have a building or two. All I could find that was missing was locomotives like have been so well done on the forum as of late. My material choices are wood, resin, plastic, or in the case of scratch building, anything I want to use!

 

In the process of all this pondering and digging it occurred to me that this year is the 50th anniversary of my tour into South East Asia at the relative young age of twenty! Why not a build of a vehicle that represented that time for me? That narrowed the choices down considerably. The only real problem was that as my time was spent in the ranks of the faceless Army. I had no ship or anything that carried a name like the Navy types can lay claim to. For the first time I came to the realization that it may be possible that us Army types are too stupid to give anything a name that is smaller than a camp. I suspect we only do that because it gives people at home a place to send “Care packages” to.

 

So now I was pretty much down to three or four choices. A M151 “Jeep”.  A M-35 2 ½ ton military truck, A little cooler but still basically just a big wooden crate mounted on a lot of wheels. A M-113 armored personnel carrier. Now we’re getting somewhere! But while defiantly up there in the coolness scale, and a ball to drive, after all you don’t often get to drive a tracked 13 ton vehicle down the streets in civilian life, it still possibly a little short in WOW factor in comparison to say a 50 ton M-60 A2 with a 152mm (6”) main gun! But all I had ever done in a M-60 was go for a ride and sit inside when they fired the gun!!!!!! GREAT experience, but not exactly a lasting part of my military “Carrier.”

 

So that left the choice at 1. The UH1-D Huey Iroquois. I had served more time in this military vehicle than any other. It was the only vehicle that I had served on as actual crew in combat. And possibly most important, (surprisingly) I just so happened to have one in my stash! Shocking!

In fact I had three or four Hueys in my stash. I had a “B” model slick even though I had only flown in one while in training. I had D models in 1/48th and 1/32 scale. Both older kits that are not really supported with “extras”. But then I found the golden goose so to speak. A 1/35th scale D model slick that while not really supported with a bunch of PE, was in the common scale of almost all the military equipment available. It had the required four crewmen, and adding cargo or troops would not be that much of an issue because of the scale. If done right it was big enough for detail and the figures would add eye appeal to the build. So I had found my model, one problem down.

 

At the same time something new was forming within my limited Army type braincase. Why not make this build not just a case of building yet another model, that while meaningful to me would possibly mean little to others outside of my personal experience.

I have limited skills when it comes to modeling compared to so many here, so there was little chance to maintain interest through publishing my nonexistent skill levels. There is, as far as I can see, very little in the way of “Nose art” for Hueys like in WWII aircraft, even though it was quite common, at least in my squadron. So that appeal of so many kits presented here was pretty much out. The same was true to possibly an even greater extent to helmet art. I do not remember anyone who had been in country for more than a month who did not have some distinctive helmet design or comment. That went for both pilots and crew. Unit markings were almost as extensive and to be honest there were probably no two Hueys that matched in color or markings completely. So, if I wanted to make “MY” Huey I would have to rely on 50 year old memories combined with what I can either make, modify or something representative that I could just plain make do with.

 

Another factor would be that I primarily flew in three Hueys. Two that we wore out and ended up someplace unknown. And one that got way too many holes in it on a bad day of minding our own business, and we had to leave it behind after making sure it was in even worse condition than it had been when we left it. Our mothers always told us never leave our toys out where someone else can take them. J

SOOOOO

 

My intention is to make this build a trip down memory lane for me and anyone interested. All are welcome to come along with me and add to the story wherever they want in whatever manner is available and personal to them. As research I have a few pictures that I can still find after 50 years, numerous moves and one divorce where things that belonged to me were often sought out and eliminated if possible. I will try to fill in as many of the blanks as possible with what is almost certain to be a partly faulty memory. I will try to insert both as I go along and things long forgotten come to the surface. I think most of them will be good memories but we will see what happens.

 

So give me a few days or possibly weeks to continue to gather stuff together. At this time all I have is the Helicopter kit a few pictures that I have not really gone through in who knows how long, and a memory that may be even harder to get organized. There is also the holidays to contend with as the dinning table is also my workplace, (I have to coordinate with my wife in this matter as well because after almost 40 years I don’t want to go through THAT again).

 

At that time, if anyone has an interest, they can hunt me down and like I said before, join in the trip in any way they choose. I am certain I would enjoy the company and possibly having someone to hold my hand now and then would be nice as well.

 

51aFirUVs1L.jpg

Edited by lmagna

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2 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

 I still have the CH-53 on my "build this!" shelf. 

We have shared some of our common past before Mark and you are more than welcome. Hopefully you can do some work on your CH-53 and throw a few pictures and good stories in as well. I know that you have many as you have many more hours than I do and the lifestyle of shotgun rider while not having many civilian applications for job references after leaving the military, is really full of other fun and possibly stupid things that just seem to happen no matter how you try to keep them from happening. (At least to you) 

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Proxxon tools seem to hold their value well.

Today I sold my MF70 metalwork milling machine, along with a precision vice, some cutters etc.  The whole lot cost me £273 six years ago.  Today's NEW price for the same kit works out around £370,  and I actually said so in the Ebay blurb when I listed it a week ago.
It sold for £405, plus a bit for p&p.  A 48% return on my investment over six years ...

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11 minutes ago, probablynot said:

Proxxon tools seem to hold their value well.

Today I sold my MF70 metalwork milling machine, along with a precision vice, some cutters etc.  The whole lot cost me £273 six years ago.  Today's NEW price for the same kit works out around £370,  and I actually said so in the Ebay blurb when I listed it a week ago.
It sold for £405, plus a bit for p&p.  A 48% return on my investment over six years ...

Very nice! It’s a great feeling being able to unload some unused stuff and make a profit at the same time.

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2 hours ago, Jack12477 said:

I built all 4 variants that Tamiya offered.

I forgot what manufactures did the two kits I have. I have two basic M-113s though. I could not find out which kit was the better model in reviews so I bought them both! 

 

I got to drive M-113s quite a bit while doing Advanced Infantry Training in Ft Sill Oklahoma I had a ball! How would you list a M-113 build here on MSW? After all they float! :huh: :D

 

If you want to see an IMPRESSIVE M-113 then you need to see a M-113 with a Vulcan cannon mounted fire up a few drums of ammo! It is hard to even describe. You hear a low pitched HUMMMM noise that sounds nothing like a gun and watch the target at the other end of a string of fire disappear!

Edited by lmagna

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Hmm... I wonder how hard it would be to bash the M113 into the M901?   I did the tech manuals on those along with a lot of "testing" what back in the day.  I missed the one trip that a classic email was sent back to the engineers "Test fired machine gun for 30 minutes.  Spent several hours putting out the fires".   They were in Yuma during late summer.

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Lou, I'm in on whatever you build as a Viet Nam memory. A Huey would be appropriate.

 

As far as M-113s, we used old ones as strafe targets for the A-10s. They'd tear up anything less substantial, like our acousti-score targets for the Vulcan (20MM) and Mini-guns. Army sent us all we could want, since the 30MM gun on the A-10 made Swiss cheese out of the M-113s. That gun sounded like a sawmill.

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I'm taking a break from running the belt sander, with 60 grit paper, across a tigerwood counter top.  That stuff is hard and wearing me out!  I still have to finish with the 60 on the right front quadrant.  Followed by 100 and 180 with the belt sander.  From there it's on to the RO sander.  I've got to cool down first! :Whew:

BathCab_11.jpg.0d46b8eb72b2fded09fcd0268332967e.jpg

 

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Glad to see you around Ken. Looking forward to your input as well. So far it  seems like I would have been better off choosing the APC as a build. It seems like people have more in common with them than they do with Hueys. 

 

But that is just what I am trying to say about this build. For my 50 year anniversary it will be a Huey. For you it would be the F4-J, for Mark the CH-53 and so on. For others it may be a different war, or no war at all, just their time in service either in their home country or some jerk hole halfway around the world where they got to play with stuff and do things that are not common to civilian life. We have members from around the world and of all different ages, who knows what could pop up while going down memory lane. Choose that item/time that most represents that time for you and come sit by the campfire and share. What were you doing 50,60, years, or for that matter last year? Was it funny, sad, stupid, scary? Hopefully it wasn't boring.

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Those are some pretty nice builds Jack. 

 

I have a friend from my teen years who spent his time in the command version, although I think his was full of radio gear or something like that as he was part of a Signal Battalion.

I have seen the mortar versions, I think they had 88mm mortars or possibly even bigger. I have never even seen a turreted version, even though I know they existed. 

 

The ones I got to drive were like your #3 picture. Except we never bothered to extend the wooden "water shield" when entering the water to ford a stream. It was far more fun to hit the throttle on the downhill part of the entry and allow the ramped nose to scoop up the water and throw it into the TCs, (Tank commander) face if he was not paying attention and ducked down into his hatch! I actually think some of them stayed up on purpose just to get drenched. It could get pretty hot in Ft. Sill in the summertime and the river water was nice and cool. In fact when we had to clean the vehicles we would normally just drive them into the river in the summer months and wash them there. Not so in the winter though. Sometimes it would get so cold in the winter that just touching the sides with your bare skin would make you stick to the armor! No fun!

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5 hours ago, Julie Mo said:

I'm taking a break from running the belt sander, with 60 grit paper, across a tigerwood counter top.  That stuff is hard and wearing me out!  I still have to finish with the 60 on the right front quadrant.  Followed by 100 and 180 with the belt sander.  From there it's on to the RO sander.  I've got to cool down first! :Whew:

BathCab_11.jpg.0d46b8eb72b2fded09fcd0268332967e.jpg

 

That is some interesting wood Julie you may have me on a hunt had to go read about it.I built for my Sister a small table to hold a fairly large vase that had been sitting on the floor for 20+ years out of Leopard Wood and Zebra and the legs of all things Aromatic Cedar they had  some nice curves in them.The house she lives in is outside of Gainesville FL built from 1890/1910 all wood floors so it looks the part for the house this is a shot of the top.The octagon was a challenge getting them all the same as you see I find that more and more when multiple pieces are require and the same shape/size build a jig.

thumbnail.jpg

Edited by Javlin

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I am REALLY looking forward to that Mark. The Sea Stallion is a brute of a helo. If I remember in reading up on your kit, it has a full interior. Are you adding to it? Where did you find your decals. I have been looking a little, off and on and have not really found anything for the Huey that comes close to anything I can remember in 1969-70 area of An Khe or Pleiku. I suspect I will have to freelance it or just fake it.

 

I did get a chance to look through my photos and I have a few left that may be useful as mood setters so that is not as comprehensive as I was hoping either. Hopefully the memory works out better.  

Edited by lmagna

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Lou, never flew J model Phantoms. That's a Navy bird and I never did a tour with them, although I volunteered for that, the RAF and RAAF (Aussies).  I did fly F-4C/D/E models and RF-4Cs in the Air Force.

 

How hairy do you want to get with war stories? Fixed wing aviators started a flying organization (River Rats) of those who flew over Hanoi and Haiphong (toughest targets to hit at that time)to help educate the kids of folks who never came home. It's added a lot of folks who were not "Charter Rats". We get a quarterly magazine with a column titled "This is No S**t" or TINS. We jokingly refer to a lot of these stories as Fighter Pilot Fairy Tales. The difference between the fighter pilot war story and a fairy tale is the war story starts" this is no s**t..." A fairy tale starts "Once upon a time...".

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 Sorry Ken

I knew you flew AF not Navy but didn't get my models right. To me an F4 is those guys who apparently thought it was a great idea to fly by the poor old whap whap plane at supersonic speed approaching from the rear (Blind spot on a Huey) and scaring the bejesus out of us poor old grunts with the sonic shock wave. A Phantom looks HUGE when it appears out  of nowhere and is what appears to be two feet away doing ten thousand miles an hour! If you were that pilot fifty years ago then it is nice to know your name. To be honest I think I used a number of names at the time, I don't really remember any of them being Ken. On the other hand I think I can truthfully say that I know what it is like to be a Wild Weasel and get buzzed by flying telephone poles. Except THEY know the darn thing is coming! 

 

I must admit though that I was highly impressed when we flew a guy out for emergency leave and while we were hovering at about mid runway waiting our turn to leave watched several what appeared to be fully loaded F4s take off. By the time they reached the point where we were they were nose up and the flame of the afterburners was bouncing off of the runway. I  had never thought of it before, but it made sense. There was a lot of power coming out of the butt of those things.

 

To be honest  the remembrances I was thinking of were more of a personal journey into ourselves whether military or civilian. Not everyone here went through the same events or were even part of the same era. Piet did his build of the Java in commemoration of his father in 1941 and included personal insight to the times and how it affected his life. Some people here have never been in combat or even possibly in the military of their country, yet had something in their life that formed what they are today.

 

One almost related experience happened to me a number of years ago. In my case it was my oldest son, (Who also just turned 50 this year) who was relating the hardships of his college and medical school days and having to work odd jobs for meals and rent sometimes etc. At first I was shocked at what I was hearing as his mother and I had paid for much of his ten years of extended schooling to get him where he was. I was tempted to drag out a war story or two to show him what "hardship" was, starting with something like "When I was your age." But then I realized that while the story would be true, he would have no reference to base it on and it would just be a story to him. His hardships and worries were just as real to him and did their part in forming what he is today as mine are to me. We are all an evolution of our past. Hope that makes some sense. I feel the meaning inside but am having trouble forming it into words. To others, all of our stories are fairy tales. Heck sometimes I think my OWN memories are fairy tales!

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Ken,

 

A very nice meditation on “who we are” based on events that formed our lives.  As I get older I get more concerned about our descendants forgetting where they came from.

 

 My father unfortunately died when my children were 7 and 11 years old so they only had brief glimpses of him From our too few visits.  Fortunately, my mother kept a scrap book of his accomplishments. While attending the recent NRG Conference, I was able to visit the Mystic Seaport Bookstore and buy a copy of Volume II of Roger Taylor’s biography of L. Francis Herreshoff that includes a brief discussion of his 23ft Prudence sloop.  My father built one of these in our yard after WW II and we later sailed it on Lake Erie.  Maybe a future model subject to pass on down.

 

Roger

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I hear ya Lou to true to true.I mentioned elsewhere my parents came from the depression era and my Dad was in WWII the only stories I ever heard were the ones on them having fun in England so it was for those who flew.My Dad taught me alot about honoring your and do the best one can with what you have no matter how small the job was do it right.He passed away when I was 20 in 81 a few months after Gary(olderB),Dad and me sat around drinking some Crown,that night I realized I have not been giving this old Man credit for his wisdom those past years.Mom was overseas traveling ATTM she asked him to go his response was "I've seen enough of the world already" he was a good guy.I tandem these thoughts this with Roger's comment about how the kids miss things as life evolves.Good day fellas thinking a bit to much ;) Kevin

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Lou,

I ordered them from Sprue Brothers.  I saw a post in (I think) Denis's B-17 build that listed two places... Sprue had them, the other place didn't. I'm not sure about the full interior though the cockpit is pretty well detailed.  I'll dig it out once the decals get here.  I may have to find someplace that makes decals though as the sample on the photo didn't list the squadron I was in.   Probably scratch build the .50 cals and pull out all the side windows.  If there's an interior, the rear ramp will open, if not, I'll get a grip and give the idea of making the interior though it's been a lonnnnngggggg time since I worked in plastic.

 

 

I didn't get war stories from my dad, only bad tall tales as he was scheduled to go (B-24's) the war ended just as he got his orders.  I did get a full dose from this brothers... Air Corps for 5 of them and one who was a Marine.  In mixed company is was humor and vagueness, in private, it was the details, thoughts, and emotions.  I really remember vividly the tale of one uncle (B-24 pilot) whos' plane got hit with flak on the way back and over France. If flipped it over and they ended flying back to England that way.  When they got close to shore, he and co-pilot had the crew bail out just in case, and then they managed somehow to get the thing flipped back right side up.  Had to belly land it.  

 

 

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7 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

My father built one of these in our yard after WW II and we later sailed it on Lake Erie.  Maybe a future model subject to pass on down.

 

That was exactly what I was trying to say Roger. For each one of us it will be something different. In your case it has nothing to do with war or even an item per say. It was the memory of the boat your father built and the two of you shared for some very life shaping memories. Thanks for making it so much clearer than I have been able.

 

I do not know if kids "Miss things" all that much Javlin. Just as you came to a understanding about your father over time so will yours gain understanding of you with time.  My oldest son who turned 50 this year has a different relationship with me than  my two other sons who are in their mid 30s. I am raising two grand children who are now 16 and 12. In both their cases I am the only "Father" they have ever known so they have built their own memory of who I am. One far different than it would have been if they had been raised by their real parents and I had been a traditional grandfather. All of the kids have experienced a different person as in each case I was a different person, and not only in age. The person who is raising my grandsons is not the same person who raised my oldest son. So our kids don't miss any more than is right for their lives. I never knew my grandfather. Was that the right thing compared to my youngest boys who are being raised by their grandparents? What will the eventual outcome be? Life presents us with paths to follow but very little in the form of maps to guide us to the next fork.

 

WOW! That took a turn I was not expecting.

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