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michael mott

Skipjack 19 foot open launch By Michael Mott 1/8th scale Small

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Nigel, Patrick, thanks for the kind remarks, and thanks to all who visited and made it known.

 

Patrick the wood base is just a placeholder so that I can work on the engine. The engine will be mounted on some Costello bolsters set for it when it is mounted in the hull.

 

Michael

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Nigel, Patrick, thanks for the kind remarks, and thanks to all who visited and made it known.

 

Patrick the wood base is just a placeholder so that I can work on the engine. The engine will be mounted on some Costello bolsters set for it when it is mounted in the hull.

 

Michael

Hi Michael

 

Thanks and I'm sure that you're not far off from firing it up!

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

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Hi Michael.

Not are you a Exelent model ship builder BUT you are also a Exelent engineer.

Amazing work you got going there.

Have been following this build for some time and the shear amount of detail to the little bits is what makes this one of the best.

Truly outstanding.

 

Regards Antony.

BTW. Happy birthday.

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Michael,

 

Quite simply stunning!! I think so much more could be added to that but I honestly believe I'd only be repeating what others have already said!

 

Out of interest, will you be using an appropriate Loctite to attach the lobes to the camshaft or are the taper pins alone sufficient? ( to the uninitiated (me!) the taper pins seem to be incredibly small across the diameter, although the lobe loading isn't exactly going to be particularly high...)

 

I'd certainly appreciate your thoughts on that and, in the meantime, belated birthday greetings!!

 

Regards,

 

Row

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First of all thank you all for the kind messages and birthday greetings. Judy and me went for a nice walk and them met her Mum and Brother for supper at a great Greek restaurant that has tasteful furnishings and no TV's.

 

Row the taper pins are quite tough, I got the idea about using them from some old mechanical navigating equipment that all sorts of splines and gears that were fixed with small taper pins.

 

I started work on the inlet manifold today, it is 1/8 inch diameter copper tube I am going to use a petrol vapor carburetor. By all accounts this type of carb works well in small engines. I can make the carb look scale and have the vapor pass right through the model carb with the fuel tank hidden under the seat or floor boards.

 

the tube was annealed and filled with some .093 styrene them bent around some 1/2 inch dowel, the the loop was folded down a few degrees to match the face on the cylinder.

 

post-202-0-66154300-1428465677_thumb.jpg

 

The extra length was cut off with a jewelers saw and the styrene burnt out. the flanges were turned on the lathe filed to shape then soldered to the tube. The faces that mate to the cylinder were cleaned up with a file and a sanding stick.

 

post-202-0-57195100-1428465678_thumb.jpg

 

The four short holes in the cylinder needed to be tapped for the manifold studs these holes are only .060" deep I reground the tip of a 1x72 tap to make it absolutely flat and square, then just knocked off a few thou with an Arkansas Stone. The head was rest in the small machine vice so that the manifold face was horizontal, used the back end of the #52 drill(.063")

to locate the first hole then was able to index to all the rest following the numbers on my plans.

 

the drill was replaced with the tap with one of the brass thumb discs for the tapping.

 

post-202-0-40205800-1428465679_thumb.jpg

 

post-202-0-19484800-1428465680_thumb.jpg

 

I turned up some stud from some .073 music wire, this allowed me to cut a slot for a small screwdriver to set the stud temporarily, I will use high temp loctite with the final set up. The stud on the right is too long so I will shorten it up to match the left one.

 

Because the space is pretty tight I made some special small diameter nuts out of some 3/32 allen key, (a great source for small hex-stock old allen keys) I softened it by heating up to a bright cherry red and letting it cool slowly.

 

post-202-0-23727400-1428465681_thumb.jpg

 

Tomorrow I will finish off the inlet by adding the T and the bottom of the loop which is where the carb with attach about 1/4 inch below the T

 

Thank you to all who visited the log over the last day or so.

 

Michael

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Never thought to go for dinner to a Greek ... always went for the TV ... Good to hear you had an enjoyable evening.

 

And you even are working on that engine!!! Nice work on those inlet flanges, I don't know how you do it, but when I tap a hole the tap mostly breaks ... Splendid job again, cannot wait to see the next part!!

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Just marvellous stuff, Michael. Intricate on the one hand, mechanically mysterious (to the mechanically ignorant people like me), yet magnificently finished and artistically beautiful on the other hand.

Well done.

Patrick

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Amazing work Michael. Drilling those holes so precisely in something that you have already put so much work in would have scared me to death.

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"Greek restaurant that has tasteful furnishings and no TV's."  Sounds top notch.  Glad you had a good time.

 

Oh ya, the motor looks good too.  I like the petrol vapor carbonator.

 

Bob

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Hi Michael

 

Thank you for share and showing us every time how you working in details. This log is incredibly instructive - even if I don't know anything about motors.

 

... abundant late but with all my heart - happy birthday "master"!  :) 

 

Best Regards!

Mike

 

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Thanks everyone for the kind comments and for the visits to my build.

 

I ended up having to make a second inlet manifold that was a bit shorter than the first one, I also made the flanges a little bigger.

 

post-202-0-05490300-1428640709_thumb.jpg

 

The brass piece at the bottom is threaded 6x80 for the carb body. I am waiting for Roger to get back to me with some pictures of the manifold side before proceeding.

 

Michael

 

 

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Fabulous work as always Michael & many thanks for the taper pin explanation.

 

Greek restaurant? Isn't that where they smash the plates? Guess it saves on the washing-up...

 

Regards,

 

Row

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This morning I received a great photo from Roger so then spent most of the rest of the morning learning how to make even tighter loops in the tubing.

 

post-202-0-12569100-1428798577_thumb.jpg

 

After a while I got a couple of parts which looked like a good match, I also used a slightly larger diameter tube that was brass so I also needed another pair of flanges (I'm getting faster at making them at least).

 

post-202-0-13101700-1428798578_thumb.jpg

 

Soldered them up the same way as the first two times.

 

post-202-0-14492800-1428798579_thumb.jpg

 

Drilled a larger hole in the new loop

 

post-202-0-03113500-1428798580_thumb.jpg

 

I wanted to ensure that it was all lined up so soldered the bottom piece while it was on the engine.

 

post-202-0-23979400-1428798581_thumb.jpg.

 

post-202-0-12175300-1428798582_thumb.jpg

 

After lunch I did some more tight loops and get a better bend on the lower part so un-soldered the bottom piece and added the new one with a 5 x 64 threaded coupling

 

Here is the new tap I made it the same way as the other taps.  

 

post-202-0-44958800-1428798585_thumb.jpg

 

and the final configuration. now I can make the carb

 

post-202-0-33189300-1428798583_thumb.jpg

 

post-202-0-48468700-1428798584_thumb.jpg

 

Michael

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Michael, the further you go, the more confused I am about the mechanics of the engine, and the more impressed I am by your machining skills!

 

Mark

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Michael, the further you go, the more confused I am about the mechanics of the engine, and the more impressed I am by your machining skills!

 

Mark

 

Hi Michael and Mark

 

....I'm afraid I'm exactly like Mark. I haven't got a clue what's going on, either.

 

At least I know impressive work when I see it.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

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Some questions Michael.

 

I would expect the carburettor much closer to the inlet, as I would expect the petrol spray/vapour to become more droplet like - when coming from farther away - and thus give less combustion as it won't burn as efficient as vapour. So why does it get mounted that low with so much tubing to reach the cylinder head ...?

Furthermore I would expect the manifold to be off tubing from an even diameter ... the one attatched to the carburettor is smaller, and rather severely bent, won't that influence petrol flow ?

 

Having applied for curiosity satisfaction, I must again express my admiration for your metallurgical prowes

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Hello Carl,

regarding your comments about the shape of the manifold, I am simply following the shape of the original design.

 

This is the manifold off a 3 HP buffalo Engine

 

post-202-0-47610200-1428859323.jpg

 

I am going to use a vapor carb which is in fact no carb at all see this video

 

I have to admit I am experimenting here and following the concept of using fumes in the same way as the chap in the video. I am also pushing the limits of what might be possible, I don't know.

I believe I can make this work, I might have to use butane or Propane, but they require a different set up for feeding the engine, if the vapor doesn't work I will go with the butane.

 

The folk who build a lot of model engines have done a lot of experimenting and I am following some of their ideas regarding the fuel.

 

Thanks for all the fine comments and visits.

 

Michael

 

 

 

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I was surprised when I saw the pictures of the manifold trials.  I thought I was the only one to have so much scrap.  But then I remember someone saying, “If the scrap doesn’t outweigh the final product you’re doing something wrong”.  Any way the final manifold looks great, and you should have no problem with the petrol vapor.

 

Bob

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Michael,

 

Thanks for the instructive video's. Looking forward to the result!

 

Bob,

 

Hope you don't build with balsa wood ... :P;)

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Just caught up with your log and boy is that engine ever a piece of gear.

 

Wonderful engineering Michael, it's going to look fantastic mounted in the ship and working.

 

Mind if I tag along mate.

 

Be Good

 

mobbsie

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