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michael mott

Skipjack 19 foot open launch By Michael Mott 1/8th scale Small

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The drawing is looking good, but some don't seem to be quite right just yet - eg number 5 looks good towards the lower part but dips in towards the top, compared to 4 & 6. Visually, it could help to see the pattern if you can temporarily 'turn off' the inner line for each rib.

 

Are you setting up any of the horizontal hull lines at the same time?

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Hi Mark

Thanks I see what you are saying and thanks for spotting that. I have been working back and forth from the plan to the profiles and in the beginning I worked a lot with the waterlines. I shall revisit the issue and clean it up.

 

I have found this work to be very time consuming but in the end it will have all been worth it I feel.

 

Michael

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Michael, great brass work on the lantern. I am looking forward to the engine build which is the part I enjoy the most in my builds. Have a great day!

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Hi Rob , that hull does look very similar, I don't suppose you have any drawings of it?

3 hours ago, xken said:

I am looking forward to the engine build which is the part I enjoy the most in my builds

Ken some of the early work on this model was with the Buffalo Engine.

 

Gary thanks.

 

Roger I have done a small Half Model Perhaps I need to do another one.

 

IMG_1900x800.jpg.0cbfe08c61b3c11aaba8786281e7bc45.jpg

 

Yes this one is not really quite right.

 

Michael

 

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On 3/6/2019 at 10:24 PM, Mark Pearse said:

5 looks good towards the lower part but dips in towards the top, compared to 4 & 6. Visually, it could help to see the pattern if you can temporarily 'turn off' the inner line for each rib.

 

Hello Mark, I am not sure how rib 5 got out of alignment, this is how it was supposed to look.

 

647922663_Capturemar2plan.JPG.61e386b05be89b74f612343161312677.JPG

 

1656414130_Captureplanmar2.JPG.910a6f8ef7217135c09c0e36782d938b.JPG

 

It was out a good 1 1/2 rib widths, so thank you for spotting that.

 

Michael

 

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1 hour ago, druxey said:

Looks like your inner line became the outer! 

Hello Druxey I can see why you would think that. My thinking and awareness have been so close to the drawing and what line represents what, that clarity for others is sometimes assumed.

the following drawing now modified shows the red outer line as the outside of the lower rub rail, (the top rub rail is left off the plan) the next black line shows the outside of the sheer strake and the top edge of the planking, the red dashed line is the inside of the planking.

1022507971_Captureplanrubrail.JPG.778a4d3029c11143d1c215fc00dffded.JPG

 

The 2 sets of numbers are large ones are rib numbers, and the small ones are station numbers ( I am probably not following traditional convention )

 

This shows the elevation of the rub rails at rib 5

1638325789_Capturerubrailelevation.JPG.faa66a61f7eb17c037585c67d36603d4.JPG

 

and the position on the profiles. The sheer strake is outlined in blue on the profiles. I had to adjust the line of the rub rial on the plan because it was sticking out way too far when I transferred that line to the profile

 

654144525_Capturerubrail.JPG.c68967590869ded9c2faf8fea50a7ea3.JPG

 

I am really not trying to confuse you all. I have no idea how the draftsmen of the early three mast fully rigged ships did it, nor the members who have produced new books full of drawings of those same types of ships. My Hat is off to those of you who have done that.

Being able to use different colors has been helpful to me. Now all I have to do is keep the colours consistent on all three views.....I'l get there. A last comment is that working in a cad program Autocad Lt 2000 and, switching to Corel draw 7,  can sometimes be a bit of a spot for confusion because they function differently. I get used to one because I can do some things more easily in it, and other things more easily in the other... I'll stop there.....

 

Michael

 

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Posted (edited)

Michael,

 

Steam and gas launches around the turn of the last century was a topic upon which I'd previously done some research, primarily on Fred W. Martin's designs for the Racine Boat Company of Racine, Wisconsin. I did a bit of digging in my files and can pass along the following information on the Truscott Boat and Dock Company, which was a much larger manufacturing concern around the same time as Racine Boat.

 

There is a lines drawing and some photographs of a contemporary Truscott Boat and Dock Company fantail launch in the Historic American Engineering Record on line.  See:  http://www.loc.gov/pictures/search/?q=Truscott&co=hh

 

00001r.jpg

 

The draft is apparently a modern one done by the Michigan Maritime Museum. Apparently the boat is in their collection. The photographs may be helpful for construction details. The Truscott Boat and Dock Company was in existence until 1948 and was a large manufacturing concern. It went bankrupt after the War. It is possible that the Michigan Maritime Museum has draughts of other Truscott launches and perhaps even one with a "compromise" canoe stern.

 

There's also an interesting 2003 thread on the Old Marine Engine Board about Truscott engines similar to Skipjack's with lots of pictures and drawings. See:  http://www.oldmarineengine.com/discus/messages/3451/1698.html  The original poster, "Curtis" says he has the 1901-1905 Truscott catalogs. Catalogs in those days often had "study plans" lines. Clicking on his name in the post will get you his email address, but his info indicates his last activity was in 2011, so... who knows?

 

Offered for what it's worth. Hope it might be of some help in your research on lines and construction details.

Edited by Bob Cleek

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Michael, Will the engine be able to function at a reasonable scale speed? Or is that totally out of the question? I know even less than nothing about miniature engines ( along with quite an array of other things too actually). All the miniature RC stuff seems to go at a scale couple of hundred miles an hour (or knots I guess I should say).>

 

Kurt

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I'm beginning to understand why a large number of the boat builders of the late 19th century and early 20th Century used half models then lofted on the floor from the model.......just sayin'

 

I have been going to bed cross eyed for the last week.

why do I feel a spell in the workshop at the wood-bench with planes and chisels might be in my future?

 

Michael

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