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Gahm

US Brig Syren by Gahm - Model Shipways

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Thank you all for your kind comments and all the likes! I am quite happy that the guns are behind me for a while and I can go after some new challenges! Chuck writes in his Syren instruction book "Rigging the carronades is not a task that can be completed quickly" . . . I guess I followed this instruction to the point :)

 

Thomas

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Hello Floyd,

Besides the guns I have not done a lot of rigging so far. For the guns I used

 

                           0.008 tan for all tackles

                           0.025 tan for the breech ropes

 

As serving material I used YLI 100 Weight silk thread (http://www.joann.com).

A while back Chuck gave a recommendation on how to replace all rigging material provided in the Syren kit with rigging rope from Syren Ship Model Company. Unfortunately I cannot find the link right now. It may be a good idea to ask Chuck for that list. He probably still has it somewhere :)

 

Thomas

 

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I added the timber heads and corrected the steering mechanism.

 

The timber heads were made out of walnut as it is easier for me to form clean edges on a piece of hardwood than on basswood. When mounting the timber heads I lined them up with the existing trenail pattern and cut the appropriate angles to have them sit vertically on the cap rail (images 1 -3).

My initial realization of the steering mechanism would not have been quite functional. The tackle ropes should have met the drum of the steering wheel at right angles, which was not the case in my first attempt (img 4). Luckily some of my fellow modelers made me aware of this. As I had to redo the arrangement anyway I used the opportunity to make the tiller a little bit longer and thus generate more operating room for the long guns in the chase position. I also made the angles between the tiller and the tackle ropes a bit more pronounced (img 4). The final arrangement can be seen in images 5 – 7.

 

Thomas

 

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Image 1

 

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Image 2

 

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Image 3

 

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Image 4

 

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Image 5

 

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Image 6

 

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Image 7

 

 

Edited by Gahm

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Mike, fnkershner, B.E., Dirk, Zappto, thank you so much for your kind words! And thanks for all the likes! Unfortunately progress on my model currently is very slow due to too much other work and traveling. But as Dirk noticed I am creeping towards the status his Syren had reached months (or years?) ago. So Dirk, if you keep on running additional projects I may eventually catch up :)

 

Thomas

Edited by Gahm

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As a next detail I added the rudder pendent. I built it pretty much as described by Chuck. Instead of serving the rope, which was used to form the eyes, I inserted blackened brass thimbles (image 1). I thought this more appropriate for a part, which is constantly in motion and where metal rubs on rope . . . and doing it this way was more fun, too ;).  The completed rudder pendent is shown in image 2. On the inside I added the corresponding rope coils (image 4). The jig to form these coils is shown in image 3. It basically consists of a block of wood covered with brass, several holes and a couple of bolts, which can be moved around. In this way I can form coils of different sizes and shapes. The brass cover makes it easy to clean the jig from diluted white glue with steel wool after its use.

 

Thomas

 

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Image 1

 

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Image 2

 

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Image 3

 

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Image 4

 

 

Edited by Gahm

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Hey Thomas,

 

good to see you are working, hehe. But I would suggest rethinking this, historically it is not really correct and physically it will simply not work. The two clamps will never hold the ruder when it is released by a storm.

 

You may check here: :-) The chain is to hold/rescue the rudder, the rope is for - if needed - an emergency rudder system and is lashed to the ringbolts.

 

a2877b093086cbd1642d785cdf590f2d.jpg

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Hello Dirk, thank you for your input! As always it is much appreciated! Where the rudder pendent solution is concerned I did a little research of my own. My findings agree to a big extend with what you are saying: big ships all seem to have a similar solution like what you have realized on your Syren. This also makes sense as chains are much better suited to hold a big rudder in case it is torn off in a storm than ropes. However, for smaller ships (e.g. brigs) beside the solution realized in your Syren I found a good number of images of historic models which show the chain/rope solution featured by Chuck in the Syren kit (see examples in images 1 and 2). It looks to me that both solutions are historically correct for smaller ships such as Syren, whereas for larger ships only the one featured in your Syren would work.

 

Thomas

 

5a0b39147145c_Englishbrigofwar.jpg.688506664003a85a3f85d6089e19e1d0.jpg

Image 1

 

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Image 2

Edited by Gahm

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Hej Thomas, 

 

my research is based on Steel - I think there must be a thread here somewhere - my thesis is also that a lot of contemporary models are not accurat in this detail.

 

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Thomas,

 

Just discovered your log - Such amazingly well detailed work !!

I'll go back and review in the a.m.

 

Regards,

 

 

 

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