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On 11/11/2020 at 7:44 AM, Gahm said:

Will, Carl and Per, thank you for your kind comments!

Will, I turned the belaying pins from tooth picks on a little Proxxon lathe. To be able to repeat the pattern reliably, I just used a little drawing with the measures/dimensions of my target pin, which I had always in front of me and which I could use for comparison (see image). That actually worked pretty well 🙂 

 

Thomas

 

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Wow, that's a lot work there. I'm admiring your build and stealing some of your ideas. Verrrrry professional.

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  • 1 month later...
1 hour ago, niwotwill said:

Just a note of thanks. Today I finished making 125 belaying pins per your method and I'm quite proud of how they turned out. Again many thanks and I keep looking for longboat progress.

 

Hi Will - what method are you referring to?  Is there a post # and build log you are referring?

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Some progress on the longboat: Planking and clean-up is finished (imgs 1-3), hull is painted (imgs 4-5), floor boards, front grating and thwarts are done (imgs 6-7), chocks are mounted on the gallows bits (img 8), and the windlass is installed (img 9). Img 10 gives an overall impression of the Syren with the (unfinished) longboat in place.

 

Thomas

 

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Good Afternoon Thomas

I've started rigging my carronades and would like to use your method for coiling the lines but I need some information on the tooling you made. Looking at the tool it appears to be sitting on a felt pad, then a wood disc, next I'm unsure of, then a clear plastic disc all held loosely by the pin. My questions are what is on top of the wood disc and how is pressure applied keeping the line between the ? surface and clear plastic? It appears the line is held in the center through a hole, is that correct?

By using the plank width i guessed the wood disc is about 1/2" dia and the clear plastic is about 1/16" thick. Based on these assumptions I'm going to make a tool and give it a try.

 

Many thanks for all you help and the beautiful photos of you Syren. Can't say enough of much help it is to follow your build.

Stay Well and Stay Safe

Will:pirate41:

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Posted (edited)

Hello Will,

Your description of the 'rope coiling tool' is pretty much correct. I used a basswood base of roughly round shape and about 1.5 cm diameter. The base has a little hole in the middle, so that a needle could just fit into it. The hole does not go right through but stops somewhere at 3/4 of the base thickness. For that reason the base needs to be a little thicker (about 7mm) to provide enough support for the needle. The needle is cut off at the end - the end needs to be flat. The idea behind this arrangement is that you can fix the end of your rope with the needle in the hole so that the rope cannot escape when you turn the arrangement. Once the coil is finished you just remove the needle and the rope coil comes free. The top layer of the tool is a transparent plastic piece. It needs to be sturdy enough to provide a flat stable surface and transparent for you to see what you are doing and how the coil develops. The felt pad is just to make sure that the whole device turns easily without leaving any scratches on deck.

 

The process goes like this: you put the end of the rope into the hole in the wood base, move the needle with the flat end through the middle hole in the plastic cover and by sticking it into the hole in the wood base (with the rope end in it) you fix the end rope in the hole so that it cannot escape. Now you add some diluted white glue on the wood base and lower the plastic cover. Applying enough pressure with some tweezers (with the right hand) on the plastic cover to keep it sitting flat on the wood base you turn the base slowly with the left hand always watching how the rope coil develops. Once it is big enough you carefully remove the plastic cover and the needle, with some tweezers lift the rope coil, cut off the rope piece which was in the hole and transfer the coil to its final location on the deck. If necessary you may need to flatten out the coil again and stabilize/fix it with diluted white glue to the deck.

 

Hopefully this description is not too confusing . . . 

Good luck with the coils!

 

Thomas 

 

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Edited by Gahm
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I finished the Syren longboat. The following pictures show the making of the gratings (Img 1), the finished cockpit (Img 2), the bowsprit holder (Img 3), the knees (Img 4), the oar locks (Img 5), the rudder with hinges (Img 6), and some images of the finished boat (Imgs 7-10).

 

Thomas

 

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Absolutely fantastic longboat. The details you have put into the thwarts leading edges takes this to another level of modeling. I think I'll call your work "artwork" not modeling. How the rear thwarts fit around the frames makes wonder how many you had to make to get perfection. 

 

Thank you Thomas for sharing this with us mere mortals.

 

Stay Well and Stay Safe

Will :pirate41:

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