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captainbob

Lettie G. Howard schooner by Cap'n'Bob - 1:48 POB - Finished

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Beautiful Work Cap'n, as always.

 

How much trouble would some close-ups pic's of the rigging be, you know me, why not borrow from a master, if allowed. ;)

especially the rigging of the top sails.

 

BTW the Bounty's launch had a sail. I'm sure many did. 

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Hi Bob. Congratulations! Your Lettie is beautiful and you must be very proud of her. How will you display her? A display case, or free standing on a shelf or table? Regardless, she is deserving of a special dust-free place.

 

As for your next model, perhaps a 'classic motor launch' such as the type that I'm beavering away on, perhaps? Just a thought...

 

All the best.

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Bob,

 

Congratulations on finishing Lettie! She looks great, and that set of sails looks does look great on the schooner. I'm sure your wife must be thrilled with it.

 

Do you think you'll build another schooner in the future?

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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Magnificent work on your Lettie. I can admire the lines and the sleek look of her.  Question for you.  What is the difference between a cod bot and a seiner?

 

David B

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Really nicely done, Bob.  Add my congratulations to all the others.

 

What sort of case are you planning to display your success in?

 

Dan

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How do I answer so many? Let me answer the questions and for the well-wishers, thank you, thank you, and thank you.

 

Keith here are some pictures of the top sails, the rigging was taken from Chapelle’s book “The American Fishing Schooner”.  The top sail is held tight at the peak and clew, but the tack is brought down on what appears to be the wrong side of the gaff, this is to hold the loose tack close to the mast instead of flying out.  There are two ways to rig the top sails.  The most used seems to be single halyards with the main top on one side and the main top on the other.  The other which I used is with double halyards so the sails can be set so they do not rub against the peak halyard.  To put the sail over it must be bundled and passed over the peak halyard and reset on the other side.  For the main top sail clew there is only one halyard, so I used a cheek block on the gaff.  The fore top sail need to be brought between the spring lines also.  To aid in this there is a clew line that goes around the edge of the sail and bundles it against the top mast where it can be pulled through by the halyard.  I did not add the clew line.  The clew requires two halyards, so a double block is used at the gaff peak.  There are two sheets attached to the tack the one in use holds it on the windward side of the gaff.  The other goes up next to the sail, over and to the outside of the peak halyard lines, then down under the peak halyard lines and over the gaff to be belayed on the other side.

 

post-513-0-65802700-1416506903_thumb.jpg

 

post-513-0-26595300-1416506892_thumb.jpg

 

post-513-0-89792300-1416506928_thumb.jpg

 

post-513-0-90699200-1416506943_thumb.jpg

 

 

The lady in question, (Admiral, Wife, “She who must be obeyed”) is disabled and wanted it where she could see it all day.  So it is in front of a mirror, on her special table, just inside the front door, with no case.  So be it.

 

post-513-0-88870200-1416506876_thumb.jpg

 

 

The launch I am looking for is a Victorian clipper bow excursion boat.  Could be steam powered.

 

I don’t foresee another schooner in my future but who knows. 

 

The difference between the cod fisher and a mackerel seine schooner (as it turns out this is neither) is the cod schooner would be carrying several dories on board.  The cod is a large fish and are fished for by men in the dories and when brought on board, are cleaned laid out in the hold and salted, and kept there until the hold is full.  Mackerel are smaller fish and are caught in a net (seine).  A boat called a seine boat takes the net out in a large circle and brings it to the schooner where the fish are brought aboard, cleaned and packed in barrels with brine. 

 

Bob

 

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Thank Cap'n'Bob

 

Looks like I need to pull Chapelle off the shelf. His American Fishing Schooners has some great diagrams, it think its my favorite of his.

 

I appreciate the time in taking pic's.... I may have questions though. Having never sailed it's a lot to wrap your mind around and understanding it mechanically is as important to  me as building it.

 

Thanks you very much Sir, you are and gentlemen and a great mentor.

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Bob,

 

That looks like a nice spot for viewing the model. Thanks for providing the spar and rigging details - very nice work and those help with understanding these schooners' specific rigging approaches.

 

Elia

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the Lettie looks great bob....congrats with finishing her  :)    I hope the doorway isn't a source for wind or a stiff breeze........I had my America next to a window,  and that resulted in a bit of a repair job.   superb work.......really nice pictures of her  ;)

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Keith, I had Chapelle’s book in my hand the whole time I did the rigging. (It’s hard to rig with one hand.) There is a lot of information in the last half of the book, but you need to be a scholar to dig it out.  We of poor brains need to go through it over and over and then go through it again.  In one place he talks about the gaff and how this or that is done, then when he talks about the cross tree there will be information, in writing or in picture, about the gaff that was not mentioned before.  I tried to make a table of contents for the rigging.  There are at least 17 different places that have to do with the mast, 6 for the booms, 5 for the fife rail, and any one of those may turn on the light bulb.  Feel free to ask questions.  I’ll be here.

 

Bedford, Thanks for the complement but it will never sail like your three master.

 

Elia,   If she were as beautiful as your Arethusa she would at least have a case.  Glad the pictures help.  Like I told Keith and I’ll tell anyone If I can help, ask.

 

Thanks Popeye. (although with the new avatar you are more of a Denis.) The wind blows past the door not into it. I hope. I hope. I hope.

 

And thanks for the many “LIKES”.

 

Bob

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Hi Bob:

 

We just got back from vacation, and I'm looking forward to seeing the finished Lettie in person.  I'll be in touch and we can work out a date.  Great job!

 

Frank

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Hi, Bob,

 

Lettie is sure beautiful!  I have been watching the build.  Which of the Chapelle books was the one for rigging you mentioned you kept in hand?  I now have 3 of his but have not really set down to read them yet.  My most recent was The Search for Speed under Sail.  That has some awesome drawings foldouts. 

 

My Admiral is finally back home this past month. 

Walt

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Frank, glad you’re back and hope you enjoyed the trip.

 

 

Walter, A book with foldouts is probably a first edition, nice find.  The book with the rigging is, “The American Fishing Schooner”.

 

Bob

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I agree, the older W W Norton published 1st ed's are much nicer as the fold-outs are glued in the text and actually fold-out. That way the drawing isn't lost into the crease of the book.

 

I ordered a old version of "The History of the American Sailing Navy" and received a 1st Ed of "The History of American Sailing Ships" by accident, similar titles. I already had "The History of American Sailing Ships" in a newer printing and when comparing the 2 much preferred the older text, mainly due to the fold-outs.

The dealer also sent out the correct book and let me keep the older edition, which was nice.

 

I've noticed on Amazon that by checking all sources, one can usually find the older ISBN versions cheaper also, plus they come with that old book smell for free.

 

Of the Chapelle books "The American Fishing Schooners 1825-1935" has been my favorite. The drawings are priceless in the second 1/2 of the book. Similar to Petersson's texts but many more close up details on individual rigging pieces.

 

Edit

for example here is the schooner book for about $40 US

http://www.amazon.com/American-Fishing-Schooners-1825-1935/dp/039303755X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416686574&sr=8-1&keywords=The+American+Fishing+Schooners+1825-1935

 

but here are used 1973 versions for about $14

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0027GJR2M/ref=tmm_other_meta_binding_used_olp_sr?ie=UTF8&condition=used&sr=8-3&qid=1416686574

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I agree, the older W W Norton published 1st ed's are much nicer as the fold-outs are glued in the text and actually fold-out. That way the drawing isn't lost into the crease of the book.

 

I ordered a old version of "The History of the American Sailing Navy" and received a 1st Ed of "The History of American Sailing Ships" by accident, similar titles. I already had "The History of American Sailing Ships" in a newer printing and when comparing the 2 much preferred the older text, mainly due to the fold-outs.

The dealer also sent out the correct book and let me keep the older edition, which was nice.

 

I've noticed on Amazon that by checking all sources, one can usually find the older ISBN versions cheaper also, plus they come with that old book smell for free.

 

Of the Chapelle books "The American Fishing Schooners 1825-1935" has been my favorite. The drawings are priceless in the second 1/2 of the book. Similar to Petersson's texts but many more close up details on individual rigging pieces.

 

Edit

for example here is the schooner book for about $40 US

http://www.amazon.com/American-Fishing-Schooners-1825-1935/dp/039303755X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416686574&sr=8-1&keywords=The+American+Fishing+Schooners+1825-1935

 

but here are used 1973 versions for about $14

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0027GJR2M/ref=tmm_other_meta_binding_used_olp_sr?ie=UTF8&condition=used&sr=8-3&qid=1416686574

Chapelle is a must in my library.  I turned to it almost every other day when i was working on my Latham.  Poor thing setting in Chicago gathering dust at this moment, :(   When I get back :)

David B

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Bob -

 

She looks sweet - you must be very proud!  Nice to see the sails don't hide all the details of your deck work - gotta love those fore and aft rigs!.  Thanks for sharing your work with us.  Looking forward to your next build.

 

Bob

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Hi Bob.

 

I am so sorry, using my IPad mini, I managed to hit the wrong button and gave you a "dislike"!!! That was absolutely not my intention, and I cant find a way to change it.

 

Any of the moderators that can help me????, I would hate it if the dislike stays.

 

Again, sorry Bob, your schooner turned out absolutely beautiful.

 

/Alfons

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Thank you one and all.  It was a fun build and I enjoyed every moment but I have to say, I’m glad it’s done. 

 

Alfons, don’t worry, my friend, with this new “up/down” system I don’t know who does what anyway.

 

Bob

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Wonderful model Bob,

 

I`m with Omega and also find she deserves a fine glass case for dust protection, allowing to lokk in from all sides...

 

Nils

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Thanks for all the nice remarks.  I'm sorry but the Lettie is larger than the table she sits on so there is no room for a case. She's a present for the admiral and placed where the admiral wanted.  But she is in front of a mirror so people can see the other side.

 

Bob

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Masterpiece! ...and such fine research. I don't know if you're still looking at these posts, Bob, but since I started my own Lettie project some months ago I only found your efforts here. (I've sent you a msg before) If you're interested in my own findings I'll be glad to share them with you. Grtz, and once more: Beautiful model (of a beautiful and super charming schooner!)

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Thank you for the response to my build.  You need to start a build log for your Lettie.  You will get a lot of help, not only from me but from a lot of MSW members.

 

Bob

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