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I'm planing for the future to build a sloop in scale 1:48, and for armament I will have 10 6-pound cannons, unless convinced otherwise :)

It's probably going to be 18-1850. 

I would like to scratch-build the ship, and of course also the cannons. I have done some research, but have not been able to find the measurements of a 6-pound naval cannon, and part of this is probably because I don't know enough on the subject. 

 

So the question is, what are the measurements of a 6-pound naval cannon around 1800?

 

 

 

For those who can read this, here is what I came up with, but I had to use very doubtful sources, and some guessing.

 

post-9205-0-30381300-1387191651_thumb.jpg

The left side numbers are lengths, and right side width (spelled that one wrong)

 

The gun should be 1,65 meters long real life.

 

Thank you for your time ;)

 

Edit, added 4-pound to title

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I haven't decided on a specific model yet, and i think it will rely very much on what plans i can get my hands on. But I have had some thoughts on the Mediator which sailed under Great Britain, and was armed with 10 4-pounder cannons in 1745. 

It would be my first model, and this one seems relatively small and manageable. 

 

This would mean that I'm actually looking for a British 4-pound cannon from 1745. 

 

Kindest of regards, Jakob :)

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Brian Lavery's book Arming  and Fitting British Ships of War has a lot of good information.  Adrian Caruana has more, but his books are hard to come by at any price.  I believe Lavery has a set of detailed dimensions on a four pounder, but I do not recall if it is right for 1745. 

Allan

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Brian Lavery's book Arming  and Fitting British Ships of War has a lot of good information.  Adrian Caruana has more, but his books are hard to come by at any price.  I believe Lavery has a set of detailed dimensions on a four pounder, but I do not recall if it is right for 1745. 

Allan

 

Thank you Allan!

The book seems really interesting. ;) I will try to get my hands on it, though it is unlikely I can get it in my money-league here in Denmark. 

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Harold Hahn, famous model ship builder, published the chart and pictures shown below. It shows not only the typical British cannon designs but also the carriages shape and dimensions.

Perhaps that helps.

Let me know if you need larger images.

 

 

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Great information, Jay. I'm quite sure the quality is just fine!

Is it already in scale? I have a hard time understanding the English measurements..  :rolleyes:

 

Regards, Jakob

 

Edit: Just took a last look, and the table on the right seems to give three scales.. Though I still don't know how to read it properly. 

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I understand your confusion about all the details. Let me try to explain the following:
 

1. Actual dimensions are shown in inches. To convert to mm, of course, multiply by 25.4.

 

2. The table to the right gives 'constants' that you than use with the numbers shown for the

various parts as 'dimensions'. The drawings show these 'dimensions', but they are actually only numbers that are relative . . . . .

For example, if you see a 'dimension' or number 3 for one of the measurements, you multiply that by the 'constant' from the table. That then gives you the actual dimension in inches. You have to convert that to mm.

 

The reason for the table is that Harold tried to give you the details for a lot of different cannon sizes. I doubt if they all actually were built that way, but that is my personal view on this.

For a six pounder cannon the carriage becomes very small and I would not necessarily go with all those tiny dimensions. But this is what Harold Hahn suggested.

 

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I see, thank you for explaining, Jay :) It all makes sense now. Maybe except for the cannon itself, but I'm quite sure I can figure it out, after a while ;)

This will be very helpful indeed.

 

Cheers, Jakob

 

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I found that the work of John Muller's "A Treatise of Artillery" to be a very good source for the dimensions and caliber of ship guns as well as those on land. It's available for download through Google http://books.google.com/books/about/A_Treatise_of_Artillery.html?id=vylEAAAAYAAJ  but be forewarned that Google is famous for bad scans. I ordered my copy through Amazon. Anyway, every detail is described such as the wall thickness, materials, and gun carriages; so I think you and others will find it a good reference. This is just a sample page. If anyone needs additional information I'd be happy to do some look ups.

treatise_cannon.jpg

I did a 3D model of a 6 lb cannon for my Enterprise model thought I would post it to.

 

6pound_gun.jpg

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Nice work on the 3D model, and thank you, you just gave me a book :D

 

Was the model for printing? I'd love to have a 3D printer, but on the other hand, the old way is so much more rewarding!

 

Edit: I see what you mean with googles quality issue. But the text seems fine, I should have all the information I need :)

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Thanks Krutzelpuntz  a 3D printer would be sweet; I made the model to produce plans for the gun carriage. You'll find some instruction for the gun carriage in the Treatise of Artillery as well. Before you decide to make your own gun carriages do a little home work and determine what time period your ship was built in. Gun carriages are not all alike and many differences exist in there construction. This is especially true of English and French gun makers.

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