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Hi All,

 

I'm about to start my second kit, and want to avoid some of the disasters of the first one.  Last time I just got some balsa blocks to rest the upside-down carcass on during construction, but surely there's a better option?

 

What is your preferred method of supporting the model when planking?

 

Thanks - and Merry Xmas!

 

Brett

Edited by ortho85

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Hi Brett.

I have kept mine in the keel clamp which is on a ball and socket joint.( Small boat )

 

Do the hull planking before adding any detail to the deck's including deck planking.

Mount the upturned hull onto a board tempeary while planking.

 

You could use some false masts fixed to a board.

 

I am sure ther will be many more good suggestions come forward :)

 

Regards Antony.

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Hi Antony,

 

How's the West in Winter?

 

Did you buy or make your keel clamp?

 

I like the idea of the board with false masts - thanks for that.

 

Cheers,

 

Brett

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I use several methods. To plank while the hull is in normal position, I use a hull planking vise. To work on the undersides of the hull, I use some paint roller covers to support the upside down hull. I sometimes just use my lap.

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I am using a Triple Duty Foam Cradle for Model Ships that I bought from MicroMark (Item #: 85819)... about $19. It is very flexible with two removable sections that allow it to fit most boats and use in many positions. I have found it very adaptable to most work from planking to painting.

 

The only thing I used a vise for was the original framing of the bulkheads. There I wanted something that held the full length of the keel to help keep it straight. I tried the ship clamp sold at Model Expo, and it was ok, but found the vise on my workbench was even better for that.

 

I also read from one of our members about using a sock filled with rice. Sounds like a much cheaper and more flexible answer.

 

Richard

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Ahoy Brett :D

 

I started with a Panavise. I owned it, but they sell for les then 30 dollars at Frys. It worked great. I have since purchased an Amati Keel Clamp which while more then twice the price is very nice.

 

I don't know how some of these guys planked without the keel securely mounted but I guess they proved it is possible

 

 

post-108-0-68971800-1387811579.jpg

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Ahoy Brett :D

 

I started with a Panavise. I owned it, but they sell for les then 30 dollars at Frys. It worked great. I have since purchased an Amati Keel Clamp which while more then twice the price is very nice.

 

I don't know how some of these guys planked without the keel securely mounted but I guess they proved it is possible

I use the Panavise a lot for almost all the rigging operations, holding small parts such as blocks and a multitude of other tasks, but not to hold the frame during planking. While planking, the hull of the model has to be in the up-side-down position and clamping the keel is not practical. After all. the planks have to go around the keel as well.

 

I rested mine on several layers of old towels. The rail along the sides, the rail on the stern and part of the bow supported the hull with the tip of the bow hanging over the edge of my workbench.

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Ahoy Modeler :D

 

It worked great for me

 

I guess it depends on when you do your deck

post-108-0-91788100-1387815297_thumb.jpg

Edited by JPett

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I built foam rubber cradles out of swim noodles with a broom handle it the center hole to cradle the hull in all its crazy angles during planking. There's a picture of them on my build log. I use three of them, but remove the center  one when I want a perfectly upright model. I use all three when I want it upside down laying on her deck. Someone thought they looked like rolling pins from my wife's kitchen. They gave me ( and continue to give me) a soft, well supported system no matter what angle I'm working on. When I start the topside and rigging, I'll make something more sturdy.

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Ahoy Modeler :D

 

It worked great for me

 

I guess it depends on when you do your deck

Looks good JPett. That goes to show how versatile that little vise is.

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Thanks for all the answers.  I like the "bean bag" type.  We have a wheat filled heat pack that will be perfect.

 

The foam looks good, but shipping to Australia??

 

I have found the Panavise at Hobby Tools Australia - so I may have to buy (yet) another tool!

 

Cheers,

 

Brett

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Instead of swim noodles, most hardware stores sell lengths of foam pipe insulation in various diameters which also have a hollow core if a broom handle dowel is to be inserted. 

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I use a variety of foam shapes I have made up over the years.

Any furniture upholstery shop has mounds of foam pieces in all shapes that

should suit your needs.The shop I used was glad to get rid of the pieces.

Mike

 

 

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I built foam rubber cradles out of swim noodles with a broom handle it the center hole to cradle the hull in all its crazy angles during planking. There's a picture of them on my build log. I use three of them, but remove the center  one when I want a perfectly upright model. I use all three when I want it upside down laying on her deck. Someone thought they looked like rolling pins from my wife's kitchen. They gave me ( and continue to give me) a soft, well supported system no matter what angle I'm working on. When I start the topside and rigging, I'll make something more sturdy.

How about a link to that cradle

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I built foam rubber cradles out of swim noodles with a broom handle it the center hole to cradle the hull in all its crazy angles during planking. There's a picture of them on my build log. I use three of them, but remove the center  one when I want a perfectly upright model. I use all three when I want it upside down laying on her deck. Someone thought they looked like rolling pins from my wife's kitchen. They gave me ( and continue to give me) a soft, well supported system no matter what angle I'm working on. When I start the topside and rigging, I'll make something more sturdy.

I do this as well but use the foam that is used to protect computers. It is thicker and there are less air bubbles. At work there is always someone getting a new computer and last year some got new laptops.

Marc

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I planked my Badger (both plankings) on my lap, and the first planking of my Pegasus in my lap.  I might just do the Pegasus second planking in my lap, but I've been thinking of using my Amati keel clamp for the upper second planking, and my Panavise for the lower second planking (when I flip the ship upside down).  

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Hi,

I use two types of support for planking.

Foto 1 This is simplest way for support hull during planking

            Can be difficult to use with some kit buildings because they have integral deck as part of structure.

Foto2 - 4 Revolving jig for hull planking
               For models scrap built is possible easily apply temporary brackets on bow and stern part of keel for attach to jig.

 

Tadeusz
.. 

post-8878-0-98723000-1427317806_thumb.jpg

post-8878-0-71695200-1427317816_thumb.jpg

post-8878-0-59565900-1427317823_thumb.jpg

post-8878-0-21173300-1427317830_thumb.jpg

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Hi,

I use two types of support for planking.

Foto 1 This is simplest way for support hull during planking

            Can be difficult to use with some kit buildings because they have integral deck as part of structure.

Foto2 - 4 Revolving jig for hull planking

               For models scrap built is possible easily apply temporary brackets on bow and stern part of keel for attach to jig.

 

Tadeusz

.. 

I did something similar to your 1st photo. I just used two 2x4 uprights, slotted with a dato, to fit the keel board, then, mounted those 2 uprights on a 3rd 2x4, and clamped the setup in my homemade board clamp. It was really sturdy and worked well. It worked a lot better then my planking abilities.post-17674-0-88199500-1427334993_thumb.jpg

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Well now I gotta build one of those portable work surfaces too...  My wife got me the Syren for my birthday, I've been having so much fun compling tools and supplies and reading other build logs... I wonder if i"ll ever get around to building the kit? 

On 1/8/2014 at 1:43 PM, Modeler12 said:

I have my little vise mounted on a 'portable workbench' and use it often with various hand tools.

post-246-0-31886200-1389210133_thumb.jpg

 

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Hi Brett, for something left of field, I used a combo of a hull/clamping vice and pool 'spaghetti' :)  The latter is cheap, works well and even allowed me to transport the model (even with the masts and rigging)  with no problems at all.  The slots allow the hull to be restrained, but simply lifting the hull you can lay it at any angle on the foam without damage to the planking etc.  The sides and length can be adjusted as needed; and the round holes to accept the longer side pieces are precut, but it is easy to make new ones.  I was lucky that the precut holes worked for me at 1:64.

 

This is my Endeavour being rigged (top) some years ago, and being held by the keel clamp. 

114102801_Endeavour26Dec15.thumb.JPG.6cf4bc2fa90eb73e6591e59e5012e93d.JPG 1971465833_DeadlightsFittedStern.thumb.JPG.5ef7d246184de7193709a5e100e32cfc.JPG

1675703097_PortQtrDec2007.JPG.e074ea563fd5b3947771c2b4d3f18257.JPG

Edited by BANYAN

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