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Moonbug

Santa Maria by Moonbug - FINISHED - Artesania Latina - Bashed

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Thanks Sjors, Grant & B.E!  Feels great to be back in the little shop working again.  Finding it difficult to be patient.  

B.E. - Hope the new shop is coming along nicely!

 

- Bug

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I decided that the stern lantern on the Santa Maria was an opportunity for me to get a little more elaborate than was likely actually on the ship.  I started by having Chuck send me one of his Stern Lantern Kits so I wouldn't have to manufacture the little bits on my own.  Then I stained and prepped the pieces.

 

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I put the basic pieces together, then started the modification process. I based my idea on a lantern I saw from one of the Russian model builders. I used thin wire and wrapped to pieces together to create a "roped" look, then filed down and flattened one side.  I glued these pieces to the corners of the lantern.

 

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I painted and rubbed the lantern black, and used parts of brass nails to create the door handle and hinges.

 

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Then I chopped off the ends of straight pins and mounted them on the top of the lamp to create "pillars" that extend above the lamp.

 

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Finally, I used a 3mm wide brass strip and filed it down to create the cross on the top.

 

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Edited by Moonbug

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That is a very tedious amount of work and the final result is incredible!

 

I'm just beginning to learn how satisfying it can be to work so hard on fine details. It's daunting at first but it feels good to see something you work that hard for come together.

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Thanks for the warm comments everyone!  

And yes Daniel, it's often my favorite part. I get lost in those little details sometimes.  As you must also - clearly.  In fact, I've gotten to the point where it doesn't bother me (too much) when I work for hours on a tiny piece only to over-sand it and have to start over.  :-)

 

Btw - love seeing the Colorado crowd growing!

 

- Bug

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  Hello all,

 

     Been working steadfastly on rigging, and in particularly hauling the yards.  Always fun for me, as I relish the details.  I'll have photos soon, I promise.  :-)

 

Also - this is the first time I've decided to rig with the sails completely furled, so that's presenting it's own little challenging bits.

 

- Bug

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Here is a look at some of the mizzen rigging that I've done recently.  

 

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Well, first - here are the sails.  I soaked them in tea to color and age them.  I wasn't sure at the time if I was going to have them down or furled. Had I gone with the former, I'd have likely evened out the color a bit more.  At any rate, I've since decided this will be my first build with fully furled sails.  It should also be noted that I've removed the weird, ugly green "rope" that AL loves to use on their sails - and replaced it with more natural looking ropes. Even furled, they should be a bit more accurate.   :)

 

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I created the parrels on my own. I'll likely rough them up a bit later during the final detail phase.  I've rigged the parrels using Pastor's method - looping the rigging then securing it with two blocks and securing it to the ship via railing. 

 

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Similarly, after going back and forth on several different methods of securing the standing rigging for the mizzen and foremast, I settled on two blocks.  This is outlined in several places, but it is certainly not definitive. It does however fit the time period, so I'm comfortable with it.

 

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Then finally, the rigging on the ends of the mizzen.  The ropes tied off to the deck will ultimately be masked a bit with coils of rope.

Edited by Moonbug

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Some good looking rigging there and a neat knighthead. ;)

 

As for furled sails on the main and fore, note that the yards were dropped to furl the sails and then rehoisted to get them out of the way. Not surprising that they needed the mechanical advantage provided by the tackles to hoist yard plus sail.

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Thanks Marktime!   I'm working on the fore now, and definitely trying my best to duplicate the tackle, etc for hoisting.  I've mounted the sails as though they were full, then I'm trying to use the tackle to furl them.  A bit tricky, and definitely not smooth - but gives me a little check to see if I'm on the right track when they're furled. 

 

Next up is the main (realizing I'm rigging out of the typical order) - but here are a couple other shots of the knighthead as a teaser.   :)

 

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Edited by Moonbug

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This build is spectacular! I really admire the extra mile on things like the cabin accessories, hinges, rigging detail, and such. Your appraoches are clever and innovative. Makes me want to go back and take notes on each step.

 

But what impresses most is the way you have built such tiny and complex detail with very basic tools. I'd have thought at a minimum you would need a lathe and perhaps a mill for the things you have fashioned. Simply amazing.

 

Joe

Edited by jmcsys

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  Thanks Joe, I really appreciate the comments. 

  I've contemplated many times investing in some of the power necessities  - particularly a lathe and a drill press.  There's definitely a trade off with using the basic tools. I don't get the same uniformity that I otherwise wood, and that I see a lot of.  But at the same time, I also feel like I get a distinctive "hand crafted" look that ultimately appeals to me.  So what was at first a limitation based on space / economics, etc, became a style that I now rather enjoy. 

 

Thanks again for checking out the log!

 

- Bug

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  Good evening ladies & gents.  Here are a few photos of updates to the rigging on the bowsprit. Nothing super mysterious here, just following the illustrations from Pastor's book.

 

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Edited by Moonbug

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And as an added bonus, a shot of the shipyard.   :)

 

Notice to the right, is my 11 year old daughter's little car kit.  She enjoys hanging out with Dad working as well.  I've started her addiction early...  

 

 

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Edited by Moonbug

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More Rigging - the Foremast.

 

Rigging the masts (somewhat out of order) based on Pastor's book required a bit more preplanning.  I did quite a bit when I laid out where the rails and cleats would go, but there was still some interesting challenges when it came to rigging in and around each of the masts.  It also got a little sketchy in terms of furling the sails.  So my methodology was to rig them down, then actually use the rigging to raise them, then furl them.  Challenging, but fun.

 

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I created the parrels for the foremast, then attached and raised it using the pulley I built at the top of the foremast. Which I then tied off on the railing of the foredeck.  I'm going to go back and put a coil of rope every place a rig is tied off, but I went ahead and did this one now so I could get an idea of what the coils would look like.

 

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I attached the bridles and bowlines to a ring. There is some indication that these were attached to blocks instead of rings in some cases. In fact, there is a bit of conflicting information - about a 50/50 split on either rings or blocks.  Probably a captain's choice.  But this captain thinks that the rings look good - and I like the differentiation.  

 

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The other thing I liked is the sheets and tacks attached to the clew with little toggles.  Loved the way this ended up and looked.  It also provided me with some great flexibility when it came to actually rigging the sails.

 

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Then here are some generic shots of the rigging, first with the sail down - then after it had been furled.

 

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Edited by Moonbug

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Like the furled sails and the toggles. Could you make them a bit smaller, scaled up they would be fairly large in comparison to your blocks. That's a nice detail on the forestay to the mainmast.

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  Thanks Popeye, Marktime!

 

   Marktime - Good eye!  Yes, you're correct.  That was a definite challenge for sure - they are indeed a bit bigger than should be.  At the same time - the clews sewed into the sails are a little larger than they should be also. So it's become a matter of toggles that stay put in the clews, as well as stay a reasonable size compared to the blocks.   

  

    And my fat fingers were a little factor as well.  :-)    Those toggles are going to be something I take another look at though during the "finishing touches" phase.

 

- Bug

Edited by Moonbug

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You 'aint got fat fingers, bro! You do realise that after making that exquisite stern lantern from old bits of twisted wire, some pins stolen from your wife's sewing box and a sliver of 3 mm brass plate that we are now holding you to a very high standard!

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