Jump to content
Boccherini

Harriet McGregor by Boccherini

Recommended Posts

Having finally completed the Triton x-section, it's time to return to this, my first attempt at a plank on frame scratch build. It is the Tasmanian built barque Harriet McGregor from the plans by Harold Underhill, scale is 1:60. Originally started before Dry Dock Models was in operation, I lost interest in it due to the number of mistakes made in the earlier stages of construction that began to affect the build at the current point. The worst mistake: frame extensions above deck level should have been reduced in thickness prior to the waterway installation. I have done what I can to rectify this without pulling the waterways out (not practical), but will have to live with the consequences and work around the problem, hoping other small details will draw the eye from the larger inaccuracies. Having said all that, the model to date does bear a vague resemblance to the plans.

 

post-666-0-75311400-1391848461_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-12074600-1391848488_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-40147700-1391848502_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-01826300-1391848514_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-06402800-1391848548_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-67612700-1391848598_thumb.jpg

 

Grant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A beatiful ship!! And the craftmanship looks really great.

No worries mate (about the frame thickness). As you say - when you are ready the overall impression will be great

Shamrock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having finally completed the Triton x-section, it's time to return to this, my first attempt at a plank on frame scratch build. It is the Tasmanian built barque Harriet McGregor from the plans by Harold Underhill, scale is 1:60. Originally started before Dry Dock Models was in operation, I lost interest in it due to the number of mistakes made in the earlier stages of construction that began to affect the build at the current point. The worst mistake: frame extensions above deck level should have been reduced in thickness prior to the waterway installation. I have done what I can to rectify this without pulling the waterways out (not practical), but will have to live with the consequences and work around the problem, hoping other small details will draw the eye from the larger inaccuracies. Having said all that, the model to date does bear a vague resemblance to the plans.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_4287 (800x600).jpgattachicon.gifIMG_4290 (800x600).jpgattachicon.gifIMG_4298 (800x600).jpgattachicon.gifIMG_4289 (800x600).jpgattachicon.gifIMG_4291 (800x600).jpgattachicon.gifIMG_4292 (600x800).jpg

 

Grant.

Hi Grant,

Congratulations, she looks beautiful. I think you did very well with shaping the bulwark stanchions like this, they do not appear oversized. Some questions: Mc Gregor does not give a layout for the stanchions on his plans, is your layout  just an educated guess or have got any information on these items of the ship. And will you include a topgallant rail? Where will you put the pinrails?

Cheers,

Rudolf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grant, I know from first hand that we are a very self critical lot. I also know that If it weren't for the encouragement I have received from members of this forum I would have burned a lot wooden hulls. All I can tell you is from what I see in your pictures is a very beautiful and graceful ship. One I would definitely want to see more of. I must confess I know little of her true history, but she is a elegant lady and you have done her very nicely. Please continue and by all means post more pictures.

 

I would like to call attention to your joggle planks at the bow. Can you please tell me more about how you got them so even and clean? And your Treenailing is just the right size and does not look like the measles. What woods did you use for the deck planking and the hatch? it give just the right contrast. did you scratch the windlass?

 

She is a wonderful model. I suggest only you will know about the stantions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I join to follow

 

Very interesting. Different parts of world and same thoughts how to resolve mistakes by over-detailing. BTW, I do not see any mistake in your photos

 

Following you with great interest

 

Nenad

Edited by Nenad M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gentlemen,

thank you for your interest and encouragement.

Rudolf, the frame extensions that form the stanchions are closer together in the areas where the standing rigging is attached to the hull via the chain plates. The extra stanchions were necessary to strengthen the bulwarks to take the strain of the rigging. This information came from the "Plank On Frame"  books by Harold Underhill. There is no topgallant rail shown on the plan, the pin rail is shown below the rail.

Floyd, joggling the planks is just an exercise in patient cutting and trimming (with a scalpel) until it comes together. The end of the joggled plank is supposed to be half of its width, the angled side is a line drawn from that mid point to where the plank cuts the edge of the margin plank (my apologies for the explanation, it is badly described, I hope you get the idea). The margin plank was joggled after it was fixed in place. I followed the method set out in the "Plank on Frame" books, which I believe was actual practice. Deck planking is pine, the hatch coamings are jarrah, (a local hard wood) hatch boards are walnut. Yes, the windlass is scratch built. With regards to her history, I know very little. Built in the 1860's (I think), she famously ran to a schedule like a train timetable for 25 years between Australia and England. Her end is unknown to me.

 

Grant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grant - My point is like you have read and tried to do the same Joggle as you have. Unfortunately my results do not compare with yours. Truly beautiful work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Floyd (and others interested in her history), the Harriet McGregor was built in Hobart, Tasmania in in 1870 by John McGregor and owned by his brother John McGregor.  She was named for the owners wife and, as a consequence, was maintained in superb condition - to such an extent that she became known as 'the Tasmanian yacht.'  She maintained a liner service for McGregor for 25 years, sailing from Hobart for London each December and arriving back in Hobart in July.  Harold Underhill has researched her voyages and found that she maintained an uncanny reliability in her voyage times.  Of seven consecutive voyages to London that Underhill studied in detail, her round voyage times varied by only 16 days!  Between the London voyages, the Harriet  sailed to Mauritius each year.  In 1895 she was sold to Danish owners and re-named Water Queen.  She was lost by fire on her first voyage for her new owners.

 

For such a small ship (length 134 feet) sailing around the world via Cape Horn for a quarter of a century, she had a remarkable safety record, having lost only one man in all that time!

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Grant!

 

Just discovered your log... I have already click the "follow topic". She looks pretty well to me. Have you considered to scrap a little bit the ends of the frames with a sharp blade? That part is going to be covered with more wood strips anyway...

 

Best wishes.

 

 

Daniel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daniel,

thanks for taking the time to comment. The bulwark stanchions have already been pared back (with a chisel) as far as practicable without having to remove the waterway. It's not ideal, but I can live with it.

 

Grant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nenad,

I used thin copper sheet, which was cut into strips, then into the individual pieces. They have been attached to the hull with contact cement.

 

Grant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the moment, I have been working on the forward section, completing the structure over the starboard hatch/companionway (I have no idea of its correct name). I shaped a block of MDF then covered it with veneers, and added some hinge pins and a handle to complete the look.

The dimensions for the catheads are only best guess, the plans are a little vague. Does anyone have information regarding the diameter and width of the sheaves in catheads, also the length of the slots to accommodate them? The out board end of the catheads are 300mm (12") square.

 

post-666-0-88897000-1395550766_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-15294600-1395550813_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-90885000-1395550867_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-79981200-1395550886_thumb.jpg

 

Grant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slow progress has been made with the catheads, but they are now essentially complete. The whisker booms are made from 1mm dia copper wire, tapered slightly to improve the look. I filed a small concave into the end of the whisker boom prior to soldering the ring on. The construction sequence as follows.

 

post-666-0-00421600-1399019083_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-03322200-1399019107_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-34247000-1399019117_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-53292300-1399019125_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-07820800-1399019140_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-58905500-1399019189_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whisker booms continued. I soldered a couple of pins to the whisker booms to fix them firmly to the catheads. Cathead sheaves are 4mm dia x 0.7mm thick, they are on a 0.5mm drill bit. All the parts were chemically blackened. The construction method is a variant of that shown by Harold Underhill in his Plank On Frame book.

 

post-666-0-18199400-1399019700_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-81321200-1399019734_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-73001500-1399019748_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-52287600-1399019759_thumb.jpgpost-666-0-36386000-1399019772_thumb.jpg

 

Grant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...