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Bounty by Mike Dowling - FINISHED - OcCre - 1/45


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Well here is the beginning of my first build log with Model Shop World. I have opened the box, read the instructions at least three times and numbered all the precut pieces. As you can see I have started the hull. I think this will be a challenging kit and somewhat unusual as part of the starboard side of the hull will be left open to show the decks, accommodation etc. That is why the hull at the moment looks like fish bones as all the decks have to be assembled at the beginning of the process. This will give sufficient strength (I hope!) to be able to do the fairing of the hull prior to any planking. 

This has meant that I had to be extra careful to get all the sections completely vertical at this stage. I have to say that so far the pieces have been very well cut making the assembly process thus far reasonably easy. The only slight worry is the transom where the pieces could have fitted better but I hope to sort that out when I come to do the fairing.

post-10647-0-70249800-1392132120_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-61431700-1392132150_thumb.jpg

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Welcome Mike...

 

I am also a newbie in wooden model ships... and I say: It is a perfect hobby... I will follow your log with full interest -at least as the Bounty is on my wishlist too. And the scale 1:45 is almost perfect.

 

Best wishes and good luck

 

Cheerio

 

Max

 

:10_1_10:

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Mike, welcome to the forum (I sound like an oldtimer which I am not). Your kit looks similar to my Bounty in that it has mostly open framing. Your's has a few solid bulkheads in the bow and stern which mine does not. So with these (flexible) open frames you will probably encounter similar challenges. However careful I thought I was being, still various alignment problems came up. I was naïve in thinking that if the rebates (notches) connecting the frames to the false keel were tight that the alignment of the frame fore and aft had to be square. Not. I have several that for some reason did not square up, even though at the keel they are perfect. This could be cause of warpage (my kit sat in a garage for 6 years before it was given to me). I've also found that the knees for the decks are not perfectly level (hold platform and lower deck) and I've had to add shims to some. Anyway, my big takeaway from it so far is that you can't trust the kits to be perfect and its a good idea to read the plans as well as the instructions. I look forward to following your progress, and hope you take a look at mine. I've not posted much to my build log lately, but I plan to catch up this weekend.

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Hi all, many thanks for all the comments, I look forward to having a look at your log Captain Al and maggsl_01 I hope I can do the model justice! I have to say it is turning out to be a tricky beast, maybe OcCre are a bit over the top with their detail!! I am hoping to get the lower deck finished  and fitted soon so watch this space!!

Because it is early days I am not sure if there is enough wood supplied to finish the kit in the end, I rather suspect not. It is amazing to me how much wood you get through just with finishes and linings. I am sure the stagecoach I built was easier than this. Never mind I am having fun, just can't believe the time I'm putting in!!!

I will try and post some more pics soon!

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glad to see you got your log up and going , good choise of scale for first build .My first was 1:100 and second 1:64 .the difference is incredible the 1:64 so much easier and more room for detail .Cant imagine what could be done with 1:45  dont worry about running out of wood a few more strips wont cost much  . take your time ,keep having fun ,and yes time flies when your enjoying yourself .

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Mikr, I also wonder about the sufficiency of the wood provided, so I am careful to take a good inventory before I start using any particular type and size.  I've gone through the Parts List and categorized each as to how many pieces and lengths will be needed for each part or process.  Its a painstaking job but it gives me confidence to use the wood as needed and familiarizes me with what is coming up.  I have found that so far AL seems to provide more than enough.  I can't of course speak for your kit.  I take a very conservative approach to using it up anyway.  For example, AL's instructions and parts list show it takes 26 pieces of .6 x 5mm Ramin to complete the lower deck.  They mean 26 pieces which are 700 mm in length.  But I've laid out a planking scheme which makes use of smaller runs (eg 170 mm, 3 times rather than a full 510 mm run) offset so the breaks are staggered, and along with the holes for grates and ladders I believe I will only use 14 strips of this Ramin v. their 26.  I don't know what they expect you to do with all the scrap they'd have you produce, but I prefer to leave as many 700 mm strips intact rather than have a lot of small pieces.  Besides, the reality is that no ship of 140 or so feet was ever planked with one continuous plank of that length. 

 

I've been remiss in getting some of my own build onto the log but I will try.

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I always save bits and leftovers. I have found them to be useful so many times!! I know kit manufacturers are not 'over-generous'. In fact I have already had to use some on the present build!!! I should be able to give you some more pics soon. Still dreading the planking!! Oh I am going to need so much help! 

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It's not as horrific as it looks...you will quickly get the hang of it and settle into a method which suits you.

 

I sort of cheat and use Loktite super glue gel, but there is a shop near me that sells it for £1 a time. (Normally £5 in the shops), so I stock up on it. Even with that though I still use map pins to secure the plank in place. Pin through the rib not the plank, and the lip of the plastic cap holds the plank in place.

 

Sorry if you already know all this, still getting to know everyone on here and their level of expertise etc.

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post-10647-0-92497800-1392892008_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-50904600-1392892054_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-24605400-1392892091_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-23486500-1392892121_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-58092200-1392892160_thumb.jpgHi everyone, at last some more pictures for you. As you can see, the whole framework has now been stained and the bottom deck cut, planked glued and varnished, cabins and bilge on top and beams ready for the next deck.

A couple of thoughts. Firstly despite what some would have us believe plywood does warp, badly!! Also CA glue does not like varnish at all. I must remember not to varnish the bits I have to glue afterwards!!

I find it hard to believe I have put in so many hours with not a lot to show for it all. Still it doesn't matter, it is a challenge and good fun.

 

Is 'kit bashing' when you get really fed up and smash it all to bits or is it altering the bits that should fit and do not or will not? If it is the latter than a good bash has been had already!.

 

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Hi again Mike!

 

You may not see so much progression yourself for your hours of fun but I still think it is looking great!  I can also start to see and imagine what is to come and I find that is pretty exciting too.

 

Haha I am not sure of the definition of kit bashing but I like yours.  And a big thank you for the tip on CA Glue versus Varnish too!

 

Keep having fun!

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  • 2 weeks later...

post-10647-0-81960900-1393944214_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-71453300-1393944259_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-23183400-1393944301_thumb.jpgpost-10647-0-19913500-1393944353_thumb.jpgHi guys and gals! I'm back having completed my second deck!! A bit if a challenge owing to the 'bendy' character of wood but eventually all the bits fitted as required.

The dreaded planking gets ever closer and I am still trying to get my head round the procedure.

 

So far I understand 'fairing' the hull and don't have a problem with it. 'Lining off' is a different matter! Some people seem to advocate the use of temporary battens whilst others favour using string or similar. What I can't understand is that if you use battens without subjecting them to any lateral stress, they seem to me to sit differently from using string. The latter seems to be placing the string by eye for a pleasing curve rather than where the wood 'wants' to go. Help please!

 

Also, I assume when working out the number of planks that are needed I should measure the widest bulkhead which would be midships and divide that by the maximum width of the planking wood provided. Is that right?

 

I don't understand the purpose of a fan template. I can see that it would provide a regular taper but boats are not like that. It seems you would have to have one for the stem and one for the stern but the template starts at one point and expands theoretically to infinity so where do you start from. You see I am really struggling with the concept here!! More help please.

 

This becomes even more complicated with this particular kit and the 'nose' section of the boat is not fitted until after the first planking. It is eventually covered by the second planking.

 

The instructions advocate using as many straight pieces as possible and filling in the gaps afterwards with long wedge shaped pieces. Whilst I am sure this would do the job I am also sure that the good ship builders out there would throw up their hands in horror. What shall I do??

 

 

 

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I'm back having completed my second deck!! A bit if a challenge owing to the 'bendy' character of wood but eventually all the bits fitted as required.

The dreaded planking gets ever closer and I am still trying to get my head round the procedure.

 

So far I understand 'fairing' the hull and don't have a problem with it. 'Lining off' is a different matter! Some people seem to advocate the use of temporary battens whilst others favour using string or similar. What I can't understand is that if you use battens without subjecting them to any lateral stress, they seem to me to sit differently from using string. The latter seems to be placing the string by eye for a pleasing curve rather than where the wood 'wants' to go. Help please!

 

I would prefer baten over string because it behaves like wood. Not from experience mind you.

 

Also, I assume when working out the number of planks that are needed I should measure the widest bulkhead which would be midships and divide that by the maximum width of the planking wood provided. Is that right?

 

Yes, start with midships bulkhead, I used a small piece of paper lined it up on the bulkhead and cut it to length. Then took the measurement and figured out how many full width planks would fit.

 

I don't understand the purpose of a fan template. I can see that it would provide a regular taper but boats are not like that. It seems you would have to have one for the stem and one for the stern but the template starts at one point and expands theoretically to infinity so where do you start from. You see I am really struggling with the concept here!! More help please.

 

The fan template- you can take that piece of paper with the tick marks from the full width planks that you just figured above at the above midships and place it in the middle of the template and find where it matches up. This is your starting point. Moving to the bulkhead either fore or aft, take the full width measurement on a new piece of paper. move to the fan template and slide from your starting point to where that new piece lines up identifying the taper and a new set of tick marks from the fan template for the taper from the full width planks from the midships bulkhead to the the current one fore or aft. You are figuring out how much each plank tapers at each bulk head if at all. You will find it may or may not differ from your current bulkhead, usually the midships bulkheads dont change much. But as you near the bow or stern it will. Take those tick marks and transfer to bulkhead.

 

Here is a goal to keep in mind, the bow or stern planks should taper no more that 50% of their full width. If they do you will need to drop a plank in there. Drop planks, separate discussion really.

 

This becomes even more complicated with this particular kit and the 'nose' section of the boat is not fitted until after the first planking. It is eventually covered by the second planking.

 

The recommendation is to treat the first planking like the second. The second is that much easier then. I dont know about your nose however. I would defer to others.

 

The instructions advocate using as many straight pieces as possible and filling in the gaps afterwards with long wedge shaped pieces. Whilst I am sure this would do the job I am also sure that the good ship builders out there would throw up their hands in horror. What shall I do??

 

Instructions are often contrary to the methods discussed here at MSW. Instructions make it possibly easier yet less like how actual ships are planked in turn the model looks less realistic especially when it is a single planked hull and the wood work is exposed or unpainted.

hope that helps.

Edited by Cannon Fodder
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Many thanks so far but I really am still lost. In as much as this beast I am building has 3 decks, should I take the 'string ' lines along the lines of the decks or am I losing the plot completely? I am sorry but I just can't get my head around this fan template - I maybe a complete idiot but I need this spelt out to me in really easy English words of no longer than two syllables. Is any one up for the challenge? 

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It might help to take it one step at a time as well. Start with the batens. If you refer to a document available on the download section of this website, "Simple Hull Planking Techniques for beginners" on page 11 it addresses this. I used this document a lot when for sorting out this technique.

 

With theses batens you are breaking up the hull into workable chunks. The batens to be removed as you progress with planking.

 

Post a pic of your batens.

 

Then we can work out the next steps. When you think of planking the whole ship it might get overwhelming but it really is just a series of small steps.

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Just an extra thought, you can see from the pics that the widest section is not midships but quite a long way towards the bow. Does this make a difference? Should I have kept to trains and stagecoaches instead?

You are referring to width of the ship from left to right.

 

For planking the "widest bulkhead" refers to the one with the greatest measurement from the keel(center bottom of boat ) along the hull to the gunwale(the railing at the side of the ship) the pointy piece of the bulkhead at the edges of the boat. This bulkhead is the one you need to calculate the number of full width planks that might be used on the ship. This might be fore or aft of the midpoint of the ship. And it might coincide with the "widest" part of the ship left /right however not always. It more depends on the shape of the hull in cross section.

 

The bounty has a very blunt bow. It is easier to conceive the taper of planks on a pointy bow. For instance the Phantom from Model shipways.

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Hi again.

I have now finished the basic part of the top deck. Loads more to do to it but not now until the planking is done. I have done the fairing of the hull, which I hope will be OK.

I have taken pictures of the transom and the bow as requested. You can see what I think you are calling filler blocks which need to be shaped for the bow but, according to the instructions the first planking is done flush with the bulkhead. The filler blocks are then cut, fixed and shaped. The whole hull is then filled as required, sanded and then sealed. The second planking covers the first layer and the blocks at the bow.

I haven't put any lines or batens on yet. This is where I next need help from the experts out there as I really don't want to mess up what I have managed so far. I will have another read through 'planking for beginners' but I can't say that I really understood it last time.

 

Anyway, I hope the pictures will assist in giving this beginner help!!!

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