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18th century Longboat by fnkershner (Floyd Kershner) - Model Shipways - 1:48

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Well folks I am going to jump in here. I will dispense with posting any pictures of the box etc. I am sure that has been covered by the wealth of logs on this forum.

 

My recent acquisition of this kit is explained elsewhere (see Dr. Per)

 

So let me begin with my impressions and a few question for my fellow Longboat builders

 

First of all this is a 1st class kit. Extremely well designed (what else would you expect from Chuck?) and the materials are very good. I have done a trial fit of the bulkheads and they all fit very snugly with almost no adjustment.

 

I plan to use this as a learning tool. I want to experiment with Boxwood (which I have never used before). I also plan to use this as a platform to do treenailing (another item I have never attempted). I am especially interested in Chuck's method of using putty.

 

Lastly Sam has inspired me to think outside the box and so I am not sure yet how I will modify the kit from the standard provided.

 

So now some questions for those who have built this kit -

 

The Basswood sheet that contains the bulkheads is 3/32 of an inch thick. Also on this sheet are the 2 lengths for the keel & 2 rudders. is this just extras or are we intended to glue then together to get a thickness of 3/16? The same occurs on the sheet with the Stem. I have 2 stems.

 

Next question, On the 3/32 sheet with the stem there are 2 small pieces which I believe are the stern post. Again is the intent to glue them together to get more thickness. Finally there are 3 bow blocks on this sheet. I can figure out what to do with 2 bow blocks but is the 3rd one extra?

 

Last question (for now) - I see many using brass rods to mount the longboat. In particular concentric brass rods. can you tell me where you got these? this method looks quite nice.

 

A final comment, since Jeff is backed up supplying all of us builders with wood. This log may move a bit sow for the next couple of months. I started it now because this is a great opportunity to gather info from those who have gone before me. I also felt this was the best way to ask questions without cluttering someone else's build.

 

PS you should all hound Dr. Per to start his build log here too. he has agreed to do a group build with me. My local club is meeting at my house today. I am going to suggest that this would be a great club build.

Edited by Floyd Kershner

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PS you should all hound Dr. Per to start his build log here too. he has agreed to do a group build with me. My local club is meeting at my house today. I am going to suggest that this would be a great club build.

 

I can hear the hound dogs howling and sniffing already.

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Floyd,

 

Welcome to the club (or is it boat)? Could we all fit in?...................

 

The brass rod I used was simply bought at Hobby Lobby. It's 1/16" hollow and cut with a pair of snips.

 

Best of luck - looking forward to following along

 

Sam

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Good luck and i am eagerly awaiting some progress reports.  Here are the answers to your questions.....

 

The Basswood sheet that contains the bulkheads is 3/32 of an inch thick. Also on this sheet are the 2 lengths for the keel & 2 rudders. is this just extras or are we intended to glue then together to get a thickness of 3/16? The same occurs on the sheet with the Stem. I have 2 stems.

 

Just extras...I had the room so why not add them just in case...shhhh dont let Expo know!!!

 

Next question, On the 3/32 sheet with the stem there are 2 small pieces which I believe are the stern post. Again is the intent to glue them together to get more thickness. Finally there are 3 bow blocks on this sheet. I can figure out what to do with 2 bow blocks but is the 3rd one extra?

 

All just extras....

 

A final comment, since Jeff is backed up supplying all of us builders with wood. This log may move a bit slow for the next couple of months. I started it now because this is a great opportunity to gather info from those who have gone before me. I also felt this was the best way to ask questions without cluttering someone else's build.

 

Note:  Just use some wipe on poly on all the basswood frames which will match the boxwood nicely.   Sand both sides of the board with teh bulkheads with very fine sandpaper to get a smooth finish BEFORE you remove them each from the sheet and to also remove the laser char.   Then give them several coats of wipe on poly.....leave the laser cut edges alone though.....dont sand those too much at all until you have to fair the hull.  Hope that makes sense.

 

Enjoy the project.   

 

Chuck

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Chuck thanks for the advice. Unfortunately the fever got to me and I already removed the bulkheads from the sheet. But I can still sand them as you suggest. During our club meeting today it was agreed that we will do a club build of this kit. 2 members already have the kit. I will sent out the newsletter and we will see who else joins us.

 

Chuck - Am I correct that you have built this longboat in Boxwood, Swiss Pear, & now Holly? If so can you give me feedback on the differences and advantages of each?

Edited by Floyd Kershner

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No

 

I built the longboat in boxwood and in bass.   The pinnace in Boxwood and now in holly.   Others from my club have built it in pear.  Its just a personal decision based on teh color.  Holly is super easy to work with.  Especially with the planking.  It bends so easily.  I have not finished that version yet.  I was curious what a fully white or "whitish"  model would look like.   Maybe like bone.   So I gave it a shot for fun.

 

Still have it but unfinished.  Maybe I will offer it up to someone else to finish it.  Dont know if i will ever get around to it.

 

Chuck

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Chuck and Floyd, based on your conversation, and as an owner of the Longboat, sorry Floyd for putting you in this position,

the Swiss pear does sound interesting, but knowing the characteristics of the boxwood, I might go with the original set.

There is a reason you, Chuck, decided on the wood for the kit.

I am looking forward building this amazing kit of Chuck.

Edited by Nirvana

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Floyd, my mistake, and yes the swiss pear sounds very intriguing. Would love to work the material.

Boxwood as well.

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I have seen Toni's Long Boat and have taken photos for our clubs newsletter.  What it looks like with boxwood is wonderful.   You will have a blast once you get started.  Every one in the Chicago Area that I know became addicted to this model. 

David B

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Dave - Speaking of the Chicago area. (since this is my log I think its ok for me to digress). I have to fly to Chicago in a month for work. I may have some free time while I am there. Is there a maritime museum or similar display that I can visit while I am there?

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Unfortunately not at the moment.  The Chicago Maritime Society would like to get a museum going but are having a hard time getting started.  When Daley

took over he siad that we do not need that heritage.  I can put you into contact with some people who can probaly help you out.  One of them is Kurt Van Dahm.

If you PM him he might know who you can talk to.

David B

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Hello Floyd,

 

If you look at Ryland Craze's build log, he used boxwood and he had a heck of a time with it. He explained to us that he had to soak it and did a lot of prebending to get it to fit on his longboat. You might want to pm him and get a heads up.

 

Happy Modeling

Marty G.

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Bill:

 

I'll second the recommendation to make a trip to the Museum of Science and Industry.  The U-505 alone is worth the price of admission.

 

 

 

Dan

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Floyd,

    I think you will be very happy with the result if you go with the boxwood planking. 

 

    If you look, you can see I started building the kit and posted a build log.  I stalled when I was unhappy with some of the results and decided to try again using a kit one of the folks from our group build bought, but did not start.  I plan to start again using the lessons learned in these various build logs.

 

    The long boat built was not a waste!  I use it when our Model Guild does show and tell sessions at the county fair.  I let people handle it and get a close look...even kids.  They are amazed that it is so light and delicate, but apparently quite strong.  The boxwood lends to that.

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Chuck - Thanks for your comments. You in particular are someone I have been following very closely on this. Do you have a specific advice regarding your experience using Boxwood? I think you are more of a mere mortal like me rather than that other Chuck. ;)

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I used castello boxwood for my planking.  My approach was different from the kit instructions in that I spiled the planks in a more prototypical manner rather than attempting to edge-bend them.  I did not have to soak any of the planks.  The castello is a pleasure to work with.  It holds an edge and there are no fuzzies after sanding.  I did not apply a sanding sealer...a must if you are using the enclosed basswood.

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Floyd,

     I also used boxwood to plank the longboat and I am very happy I did.  I also used the brass rods for my stand.  I either picked up some rod at my local hobby shop or had left over material from another kit.  The rod I used was 1/16".

 

     Good Luck and keep posting,

                   Bob R.

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Bob - How long of a rod did you use? Did you modify the rod in any way, such as tapering it? Did you also treat the rod in any way to delay aging? Did you do anything special for bending or spiling the planks?

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I also used brass rods for mounting.  Both the rods and the "fancy" base came from Hobby Lobby.  I did not taper them but I did drill a pilot hole in the keel assembly prior to press-fitting them in place.  I then removed them until the model was completed.  Keep in mind that the model weighs next to nothing so minimal strength is required for the mounting supports.

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No taper, no modification.  I think I cut them to 3" and drill the holes in the keel to 3/64".  As Toni says, it is very light.

 

                Bob R.

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Floyd,

 

    With regard to length of rod:  pick a length that will lift your model off the base a distance which makes the model look good.  I would think 4 to 6 inches, depending on the base.  Experiment. 

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I have found boxwood harder and potentially more brittle than basswood.  When bending, I would recommend soaking it a little-10-20 minutes depending on thickness.  Not too much because it may washout color.  It sands well and finishes well.  When using basswood, I usually use a sanding sealer to keep the surface from fuzzing up.  Boxwood does not require that.

 

Be sure to use dust mask when sawing and sanding.  While we should avoid inhaling ALL sawdust, I find boxwood dust (like most exotic hardwoods) causes temporary respiratory issues.

 

Chuck

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Ok guys I have taken the plunge. As suggested I have sanded both sides of the 3/32 laser cut sheets to remove the burn marks. I have painted both side of both sheets with 2 coats of Wipe On Poly to harden up the wood. I then removed the false keel and bulkheads from their respective sheets. I put the bulkheads in a baggy and set them aside. I have carefully sanded the false keel (held my breath on that one!) good thing it came out ok. I then took the sheet of 3/32" box wood I got from Jeff. Gotta love that stuff! I cut a strip off the length for the keel. it yielded 4 keels. Then I cut the stem piece. I screwed up the first one and had to cut another. Cutting the scarf joint to match was frustrating.

 

Next I glued the boxwood stem & keel to the false keel. I think the it looks ok. As soon as the glue dries I will take a picture or 2. Then comes the bulkheads!

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Floyd, hope you sanded the false keel to the 1/32" dimension mentioned in the instructions, before you added the boxwood keel and stem? ;)

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Sure did. :) And now that I am adding the bulkheads it looks like the sanding is just fine. I have a nice groove on each side and a plank fit perfectly. It looks like I could have used a bit more sanding aft. Oh well. I am also going to fill the scarf joint with putty. Good thing the keel will be painted.

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Floyd,

    Welcome to the fleet.  Your discussion above brought back some bad memories of the scarph joint.  I went back and looked at mine.  I remember!!!!!  The overhang of the stem part is above the overhang of the keel part.  This caused me some probblems.  I would have prefered the other way.  That way I could have fitted the stem to the hull, then fitted the keel into the stem and hull. I have another kit, so I may do as you did and make the stem and keel from boxwood and do the joint differently.

 

    How did you eventually do the stem piece so that it doesn't snap off?

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Hi Chuck, I did part of what you recommended. I cut the stem as 1 piece with the grain running up and down from the prow. I was not as confident in my cutting skills to go for 2 pieces. But I did use the basswood piece as a template and then cut it with the scroll saw. about 1 hour of careful sanding and I had a useful stem. Well at least I did on the 2nd try. I haven't used the scroll saw as much as some of my other tools. I guess I will be changing that with this kit since I am replacing lots of parts with Boxwood.

 

I will just pretend I am practicing for when Chuck publishes his book. The saw may get a lot more of a workout.

 

PS Sam I have not forgot about you. I have a wonderful envelope on the shelf that I need to spend some time with. I just wanted to get this kit to the point of planking before our club meeting.

Edited by Floyd Kershner

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