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Ilhan Gokcay

Matthew 1497 by Ilhan Gokcay - Scale: 1/50 - Finished

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Beautiful rigging work IIhan, and finely made sails. Interesting at that period that there are Leech lines on both sides of the Main sail yet no Bunt lines.

 

B.E.

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Thank you very much my friends.
 

Hi B.E. thanks for the tip. You are right but indeed there are too many dubious points with this ship. Even the belaying pins were most likely not in use at that period. . I've omitted some of them and also reduced the numbers but some of them remained.

As source I've also an article from NRJ and Pastor's AOS "The ships of Christopher Columbus". But I must confess that I've not tried my best.

(I don't remember exactly, I've read somewhere that leech lines do exist before the buntlines. But I should check this)

 

P.S. for the moderator. I've attached some pages from a journal and a book. If there is a problem with the copyright I can delete them.  

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There are two replicas. One of them based on drawings of Colin Mudie (See the article on NRJ). This is the Bristol replica.

My drawings are based unfortunately on the other replica built at Bonavista.

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Hello IIhan,

 

I wasn't intending to suggest that there was anything wrong with your rigging arrangement, I'm not very familiar with 15th Century rigging, and it is a  period where perhaps not unnaturally there is less detailed information than for the later periods I'm more familiar with.

 

However I was moved by curiosity to check in Anderson's The Rigging of Ships in the days of the Spritsail Topmast 1600 - 1720.

 

What you show on Matthew  are called Martnets and they did run up both sides of the sail, and performed the same function as the more simple form of Leechlines which superceded them around the middle of the Seventeenth Century, although there was the inevitable transition period where the information gets a little hazy.

 

As far as Buntlines go Anderson does suggest that they were in use certainly around 1600, and it would seem odd to devise such elaborate rigging to haul in the Leech of the sail and not fit ropes to help lift the foot of a sail.

 

B.E.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

 

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Hi B.E. its ok. Your questions are right but I've no answer. By the time I've found the text about the leech lines and bunt lines. It was from "Mondfeld" and I am not able to comment on the reliability of this information.

There are also no traces of foot ropes for that period. Maybe sails are not furled tight to the yard as we think of it but hold together somehow and the yard was lowered to the deck.

For my model of Mayflower I've strictly followed R.C.Anderson. But for the period of Matthew there are lots of questions.

 

Cheers

Ilhan

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Attached the last sail and the anchors and it's finished.

 

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Hi Ilhan, I had wondered where you had disappeared, but it appears you were tucked away finishing this gem of a build.  very nice finish, cleanly built and presented - an all round beautiful model mate.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Congratulations for finishing this beautiful model, Ilhan!
I hope you have already plans for the next project and I'm looking forward to a respective build log!

 

 

Klaus

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