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Maine Peapod by MikeB4 - FINISHED - Midwest Products - 1:14-small boat


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I've decided to put the Phantom down for awhile the final deciding factor was that during my move I some how lost the wire that was supplied with the kit.So while I'm trying to find some wire to replace the original I'm going to start this kit. this will be my first attempt at planking, this seems like a good beginners kit. I've also purchased the 18th Century Long Boat and the English Pinnace for future builds. I think I'll stick to building boats for awhile and learn how to plank on them before I take on a model ship.

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Edited by MikeB4
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Mike, That is a nice little kit. Be aware when you start to plank around the turn of the bilge that you will have to taper the planks on both ends. The instructions don't tell you this but it impossible to get the planks to lay against the forms if you don't. Just trim them so they lay against all the forms without stressing the wood.

 

Al D.

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Mike, That is a nice little kit. Be aware when you start to plank around the turn of the bilge that you will have to taper the planks on both ends. The instructions don't tell you this but it impossible to get the planks to lay against the forms if you don't. Just trim them so they lay against all the forms without stressing the wood.

 

Al D.

Thank you for the heads up.

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Hi Mike,

 

I too have the Phantom currently shelved along with other more advanced kits like the MS Fair American and the 18th Century Longboat. My approach is to start off simple while building up my skill level. I have started out with the Midwest boats because I found them to be a great set of kits to learn from. In fact, I am close to completing the Maine Peapod and I have found it to be enjoyable to work with. As Alde has mentioned, the only tricky part is the planking around the bilge. But everything after that is straightforward.

 

JB

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Hi Mike,

 

I too have the Phantom currently shelved along with other more advanced kits like the MS Fair American and the 18th Century Longboat. My approach is to start off simple while building up my skill level. I have started out with the Midwest boats because I found them to be a great set of kits to learn from. In fact, I am close to completing the Maine Peapod and I have found it to be enjoyable to work with. As Alde has mentioned, the only tricky part is the planking around the bilge. But everything after that is straightforward.

 

JB

I wish I had known before purchasing the Phantom that it's really not a beginners kit at least not for those of us who have no real prior experience. although Model Expo claims it is a good first kit, I think it's quite deceptive of them to give you the impression that this kit is so easy even a caveman could do it.They leave out the fact that you have to figure out how to manufacture 80 percent of this kit on your own which requires some pretty advanced techniques. I use the word kit loosely it should be called a box filled with bass wood that has a picture of a boat on it. When I saw the Peapod Model I new this is a good beginner's kit,I wish I had found this one first.

Edited by MikeB4
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  • 2 weeks later...

I've got to this point But this is where it gets a little tricky . I tried tapering the ends of the plank but still finding it difficult to get the center to bend to the form. I'm going to try soaking the planks and pinning each one to the form. hopefully it will take the shape and dry that way.

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Mike, They sure don't tell you any of this in the instructions. They need to be re-writen. This was the first planked hull that I tried and before I was a member on MSW and got frustrated with it. I didn't know anything about fitting and bending the planks. Soaking and pinning will go a long way to getting your planks right. You may also have to bevel the plank edges so the sit next to each other tight. Also, try a little amonia in the warm water when you soak the planks and give them a few hours to soak.

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I built Midwest's Peterboro Canoe, and this part of the construction looks similar.  What worked wonders for me was beveling the lower edge of each new plank as you add it.  I did it by hand, by sanding the plank on the thin edge at an angle and it made all the difference.  It will especially important as you move over the curve toward the keel.

 

One thing I had trouble with was conforming well enough to that curve to meet the keel properly - the planks really wanted to go higher than the keel.  If you fight that battle early (keeping each plank on the bulkhead), it might be easier as your reach the keel.  Good luck.

 

Andy.

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Mike, 

 

I have this kit waiting for me, exciting to see someone experienced start the build!

 

I'll have my chair pulled up! Following along.

 

Cheers

Eyup

I'm far from experienced, I'm learning the craft.It'll be interesting to see what the end result will look like.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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